Never...goddamn...fucking...fails...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2010 4:36 PM GMT
    I plan a day, and get called into work just as I'm getting ready to head out. icon_sad.gif

    [/rant]

    Update: See video posted below. I turned it into a good day and got some cool video. icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 10, 2010 4:49 PM GMT
    Usually when that happens with me, the other people involved usually bounce back with something better.

    So I sometimes wish to be called in for others sakes. Hahaha.
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    May 10, 2010 4:59 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI plan a day, and get called into work just as I'm getting ready to head out. icon_sad.gif

    [/rant]

    I don't suppose you have caller ID, and knowing it's from work, just not answer it? I mean, what if you had already gone out, and you weren't there to answer it, what would they do? Fire you? Or must you carry their company cell, and are obliged to answer it 24/7? That's not a job, but indentured servitude.
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    May 10, 2010 4:59 PM GMT
    That's why I leave the phone off.. LOL
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    May 10, 2010 5:03 PM GMT
    The nature of what I do (high level systems admin on high performance 24 x 7 systems) requires that I be a call away all the time. When I'm not, folks get cranky.

    It's like that with about any critical job. You have to do it. Now, sometimes, poorly managed business takes advantage of you, if you let them. That's when you say "this is my day off; I have lots of things I need to get done; doing ${item} can wait until ${date}.

    I'll also triage folks. If I'm working on a critical issue ( a system with performance issues, let's say) I will blow off all email, texts, and phone calls, until the issue is resolved. Folks get furious, but, I'll explain to them that they were triaged and that the downed system issue took clear precedent. That almost always shuts them up.
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    May 10, 2010 5:28 PM GMT
    Sounds familiar. Either that or they do not know how to do something. One day the front registers crashed and no one knew how to get them back up and running except for me. I would have thought that with them watching what I was doing every time they crashed that they would all know. I started keeping my phone turned off unless I was expecting a call then I would look at the caller ID and just not answer it. Then I got promoted and could not do that anymore. Kind of sucks doesn't it.
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    May 10, 2010 5:35 PM GMT
    Worst phone call I shouldn't have answered:

    It was July 4th, 1984, and I was a bachelor living alone in a civilian community, teaching the US Army ROTC program at a university, far from any Army post. I was planning a lazy day, perhaps watching fireworks that night.

    The phone rang about 9 AM, no caller ID back then, and I instantly had a premonition about not answering it. I had few local friends in that community, and I couldn't think why my ROTC colleagues, just a handful and all married, would be phoning me at home, which they never did. Against my better judgment I picked it up.

    "Hello, is this Major Robert XXXX?" said an official-sounding voice.

    "Oh, hell, I KNEW not to answer it!" I thought to myself. I confirmed my identify.

    "This is Fort Carson, Colorado, Death Notification Office."

    "FUCK!" I wanted to scream. Turns out they had a list of all us Active Duty officers in their region, and I was the only one who had so far answered his home phone on a holiday. With no Army posts nearby, ROTC instructors were about it.

    "You are being appointed the Death Notification Officer for a soldier in your area..." The rest of the details you do not need to know in this thread, except the young soldier had been killed in a training accident in Georgia the day before. My job was to tell his family, some 150 miles away, to drive there in my own private car ASAP.

    They gave me no instructions how to do this, nor did they have any details how the death had occurred! What the HELL was I supposed to say to them, except that your son is dead, more to follow? Fucking insensitive idiots!

    I quickly phoned the Army installation where the death had occurred, and managed to learn some useful details from their Public Affairs Office (like PR in the civilian world). Next I phoned the town's police dept, since the only address I had was a rural route mailing one, deep in farm country. They confirmed the family's name, and were able to tell me they were Catholics and the name of their parish. Next I phoned & contacted their priest, and after several calls back & forth, was able to coordinate meeting with a police officer and the priest at a rendezvous point I could find in that remote area.

    Putting on my dress green uniform I drove the 150 miles, and succeeded in finding them. A police cruiser led me down dirt roads that I could never have known, the priest riding with me, until we reached a farmstead. As we drove up the mother was outside in a garden.

    And when she saw a police officer, a priest and an Army officer all coming towards her, she already knew her son was dead. I had tried to rehearse something to say, but it wasn't necessary.

    "John's dead, isn't he?" she asked us before we could say a word to her. I confirmed it. The priest then took the job of comforting her. Her husband wasn't home, just her. The rest of this sad story I'll keep to myself.

    But every time I hear something about a phone call that shouldn't have been answered, I recall that incident. I suppose I did my duty, and better than some others might have, what I signed on to do when I took an Army career. But honestly, there are some jobs you'd rather not have, ya know?
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    May 10, 2010 5:49 PM GMT
    Caller ID is your friend!

    i tell work to call me anytime they want/need me.

    'course, that doesn't mean i'll answer their call.... icon_lol.gif
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    May 10, 2010 7:47 PM GMT
    what a shame
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    May 10, 2010 8:21 PM GMT
    Agility and the ability to respond to sudden change in an effective and efficient manner is a good quality to possess. The race doesn't necessarily go to the fastest anymore...it goes to those who can adapt to the course even if the course changes in the middle of the race.

    Expect the unexpected. Murphy was an optimist.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 10, 2010 8:23 PM GMT
    Kind of a bummer....but I know how it is with client related demands as well......
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2010 9:48 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI plan a day, and get called into work just as I'm getting ready to head out. icon_sad.gif

    [/rant]


    Quit and stay home and massabate (masturbate)
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 11, 2010 12:00 AM GMT
    Don't blame them.
    You're the one who answered the phone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 11, 2010 12:48 AM GMT
    Yay I'm back! And I made the trip worthwhile...got some excellent video footage of a crashed DC-3 in the middle of Bumfuck Florida Everglades. I'll post it later. Now I'm going out for cock............tails.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 11, 2010 5:55 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidWorst phone call I shouldn't have answered:

    It was July 4th, 1984, and I was a bachelor living alone in a civilian community, teaching the US Army ROTC program at a university, far from any Army post. I was planning a lazy day, perhaps watching fireworks that night.

    The phone rang about 9 AM, no caller ID back then, and I instantly had a premonition about not answering it. I had few local friends in that community, and I couldn't think why my ROTC colleagues, just a handful and all married, would be phoning me at home, which they never did. Against my better judgment I picked it up.

    "Hello, is this Major Robert XXXX?" said an official-sounding voice.

    "Oh, hell, I KNEW not to answer it!" I thought to myself. I confirmed my identify.

    "This is Fort Carson, Colorado, Death Notification Office."

    "FUCK!" I wanted to scream. Turns out they had a list of all us Active Duty officers in their region, and I was the only one who had so far answered his home phone on a holiday. With no Army posts nearby, ROTC instructors were about it.

    "You are being appointed the Death Notification Officer for a soldier in your area..." The rest of the details you do not need to know in this thread, except the young soldier had been killed in a training accident in Georgia the day before. My job was to tell his family, some 150 miles away, to drive there in my own private car ASAP.

    They gave me no instructions how to do this, nor did they have any details how the death had occurred! What the HELL was I supposed to say to them, except that your son is dead, more to follow? Fucking insensitive idiots!

    I quickly phoned the Army installation where the death had occurred, and managed to learn some useful details from their Public Affairs Office (like PR in the civilian world). Next I phoned the town's police dept, since the only address I had was a rural route mailing one, deep in farm country. They confirmed the family's name, and were able to tell me they were Catholics and the name of their parish. Next I phoned & contacted their priest, and after several calls back & forth, was able to coordinate meeting with a police officer and the priest at a rendezvous point I could find in that remote area.

    Putting on my dress green uniform I drove the 150 miles, and succeeded in finding them. A police cruiser led me down dirt roads that I could never have known, the priest riding with me, until we reached a farmstead. As we drove up the mother was outside in a garden.

    And when she saw a police officer, a priest and an Army officer all coming towards her, she already knew her son was dead. I had tried to rehearse something to say, but it wasn't necessary.

    "John's dead, isn't he?" she asked us before we could say a word to her. I confirmed it. The priest then took the job of comforting her. Her husband wasn't home, just her. The rest of this sad story I'll keep to myself.

    But every time I hear something about a phone call that shouldn't have been answered, I recall that incident. I suppose I did my duty, and better than some others might have, what I signed on to do when I took an Army career. But honestly, there are some jobs you'd rather not have, ya know?


    And, we're reminded by your poignant story that life is fragile, and that any moment things change instantly.
  • jgymnast733

    Posts: 1783

    May 12, 2010 2:08 AM GMT
    I know what you mean, it happends to me all the time..
    My job consumes my life and my boss will beg me to come in to assist a particular guest who insists on having me solely take care of her...So here i come back to work [cocktailed,most of the time] to assist a woman wanting the entire top floor and its only her checking in [because she needs her space]..icon_rolleyes.gif
    My boss bringing me in is a trifle considering the loot this chic is laying out...but yes, i know what you mean.icon_evil.gif
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    May 12, 2010 4:28 AM GMT
    jgymnast733 saidI know what you mean, it happends to me all the time..
    My job consumes my life ...
    That's what my problem is.
    I hate being on call every day, but I love the work because I get to see really cool shit. icon_lol.gif

    So maybe I hated being called in, but at least I turned it into a good day:

    (yes I know the windscreen needs cleaning...that's what happens flying low over the Everglades during "love bug" season)
  • NashRugger

    Posts: 1089

    May 12, 2010 4:37 AM GMT
    ah lovebugs, the things that ruin vehicle paint and make the front of the Amtrak train turn charcoal black. thank goodness we got a few more weeks to go before the start up here.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 12, 2010 5:37 AM GMT
    futuresooner saidah lovebugs, the things that ruin vehicle paint and make the front of the Amtrak train turn charcoal black. thank goodness we got a few more weeks to go before the start up here.
    Don't bet your ass on it. They're already everywhere between here & St Pete. They'll be up your way soon. icon_wink.gif