Should I keep on the regular program or rest until the sore is gone..

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 12, 2010 6:34 AM GMT

    I just started a new intense exercise program. In the last two days I worked on my upper and my lower body muscles. According to the program I need to workout today too, but All my body is sore.

    should I continue on the regular rotine or rest until the sore goes?
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    May 12, 2010 6:51 AM GMT
    workout, but don´t push to the point of hurting yourself. The best cure for stiff muscles from working out is to work out again, but a bit less intensely.
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    May 12, 2010 1:52 PM GMT
    Yes... It's called advil and Icy hot
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    May 12, 2010 1:58 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidworkout, but don´t push to the point of hurting yourself. The best cure for stiff muscles from working out is to work out again, but a bit less intensely.

    Agreed. When beginning a new program it is NOT usually wise to ignore the pain and keep pushing yourself hard. Your body needs time to adjust, and to recover from any initial strain.

    Otherwise you run the risk of more serious injury, and you ultimately delay your recovery from this initial period of soreness. There are times your body needs some pampering, and this is one of them. Later you can go back to trying to kill yourself. LOL! Good luck! icon_biggrin.gif
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    May 12, 2010 2:24 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidworkout, but don´t push to the point of hurting yourself. The best cure for stiff muscles from working out is to work out again, but a bit less intensely.


    ^^This.

    Drop the weight so you're not pushing yourself as hard (then up it again when you're not sore). It will help the soreness and it will make you feel better because you're keeping your training schedule.

    If you just started an intense exercise program you're going to be sore for a while though! ;) (I remember a 2-3 weeks where I could barely walk. Oooh. Actually that reminds me: stretch! It's really important when you start a new weight program - or whenever you hit yourself hard enough to get sore [yeah yeah, it's always good, but sometimes you really do *need* it]. You're muscles will tighten up and you can injure yourself pretty easily.)
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    May 12, 2010 2:45 PM GMT
    MsclDrew saidYes... It's called advil and Icy hot


    ABSOLUTELY the worst advice ever. You're just destroying your body's signs that say stop. Icyhot fine. Advil is a painkiller, ie it numbs the nerves that indicate injured or worn down areas. THE WORST advice.

    1) don't workout
    2) workout with extreme caution and perhaps 20-30% of the intensity (weight if lifting) than before
    3) Work different muscles that do not rely on the fatigued ones.
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    May 12, 2010 2:59 PM GMT
    Pain is your body's warning. That warning may be urgent (STOP IT!); that warning may be caution (I'm on the verge of something breaking here.); that warning may be indicative of disease or malfunction (I'm not right; you need to check me out.).

    Listen to those signals.

    If you're sore, then you need to recover. Sometimes, just flushing the area that hurts out is enough to fix it. Don't be an idiot, however, and ignore your body, and train extremely sore. It's dumb. You can, and will, get injured. You make gains in your RECOVERY and NOT in your training. Train smart. If you're so sore you have trouble moving around, take the day off, and next day, go easy. You should train with the view that you'll be doing it for a lifetime, and assess your risks with that in mind.

    This is common sense. Do not train injured.

    If your legs are real sore, ride a bike for a while, but, chill on the weights. Use those same sorts of methods with other body parts, too.

    Stay hydrated. Make sure you EAT. Make sure you get enough rest.

    Folks get injured when they do the "weekend warrior" mentality. You need to do the "every day" mentality, but, ease into it.
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    May 12, 2010 2:59 PM GMT
    to clarify what I said:

    it´s good to do some sort of work out on the "stiff" day, but you don´t want to hit it hard. Some sort of exercise will keep the blood flowing which is how the body heals itself. I don´t know what the exercise routine asks for, but the third day is good for a whole body work out with body weight or cross training (swimming etc).

    If you can´t do this then you did too much in the initial work outs and it´s not sustainable and you need a different routine plan...

    Keep the ice pack for immediately after strains to decrease inflammation. Ditto the ibruprofen. DON¨T use them before working out. Horrible idea (not sure that was what Drew was saying, but DON¨T do it).
  • twentyfourhou...

    Posts: 243

    May 12, 2010 3:38 PM GMT
    My take. Soreness and muscle fatigue are acceptable, pain is not. Anytime i do a new routine or kick it up a notch, i get some mild soreness but for the most part i stick to my routine the following day. Here is an exception. Lets say the day after doing a lower body routine i am suppose to jog 5 miles but my lower body is killing me. I mean i have trouble getting out of the car or walking up stairs then no, i will not jog. Instead i might work my chest/shoulders/arms that day - might as well not waste the day entirely and besides these muscle groups are not sore.
    In general, i try to avoid working a particulary sore muscle group - i try to let them "heal". This approach is particularly useful if you are working different muscle groups every day or every other day. If you are working all muscle groups every time you workout out - then foreget what i just said.
    For soreness, i do not use advil or ice. I save these for painful joints (tendons,ligaments,etc).
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    May 12, 2010 4:12 PM GMT
    You have to learn the difference between soreness and pain. If it is delayed onset muscle soreness that you are experiencing, it is ok to resume your normal workout at a reduced intensity. This will help with to decrease the soreness. Maybe incorporate some cardio (stationary bicycling) and some thorough stretching to relieve some of the discomfort.

    If you are having pain, this means that you may have experienced an injury and need to take a break until the pain goes away.

  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    May 13, 2010 1:55 AM GMT
    Pain is your body's physiological way of telling that you're doing something wrong, or that something is wrong. Stop doing that activity, and come back at it in small ways.
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    May 13, 2010 2:35 AM GMT
    Muscles need time to heal in order to grow and function at their peak performance. Muscle soreness is the body's way of saying "hey man, I'm not healed yet."

    So, unless you NEED to rush things (career based on body image) then there's no reason to workout while you're sore.
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    May 13, 2010 2:37 AM GMT
    neosyllogy said
    Lostboy said Actually that reminds me: stretch! It's really important when you start a new weight program - or whenever you hit yourself hard enough to get sore [yeah yeah, it's always good, but sometimes you really do *need* it]. You're muscles will tighten up and you can injure yourself pretty easily.)


    YES! Stretching is so incredibly important as well as other warm-up routines, like rotating joints (including and especially your back and neck).
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    May 18, 2010 5:01 PM GMT

    I always do stretches, especially after the workout.. but not too much warm-ups since i get tired after that. and I don't have much times..

    Can you suggest some good warm up/ stretching routines?

    And thx for all who replied!
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    May 22, 2010 12:20 AM GMT
    There is a way to test if your muscle has fully recovered. Wmthe next time you workout when you do the same exercise, if you are able to do 1-2 more reps than last time, that means your body has reached the recovered enough (and grown muscle).