Feel bad about pest control

  • mcwclewis

    Posts: 1701

    May 14, 2010 1:21 AM GMT
    I know this will probably make me sound like a pussy-fart but I don't really care.


    So there's been a mouse running around my bedroom for the last 3 days or so, distracting me from my final papers, eating things, and pooping. I tried to catch him but he always got away. My housemate gave me some glue traps to put in my room to catch him, and I didn't even think about the consequences of it.

    So today I found the little mouse trapped in glue. He was struggling to get free and I felt so bad I cut as much of the glue from him as I could and put him outside with a piece of bread and a bottlecap full of water. I figured the only parts still stuck were his front legs and he seemed to be making progress, and he did eat some of the bread.

    A couple hours later I went out to see if he had made his escape, and he was just laying there. He was still breathing but he was almost dead. Someone on facebook told me that vegetable oil will loosen the glue, but all I had was olive oil, so I brought some out and tried to get his legs free, but it was too late.

    I know it was just a mouse but I feel like shit that I pretty much killed him... and it wasn't exactly quick and painless.

    Is it weird that I have zero problem killing spiders and house centipedes (which I thankfully haven't seen in this house yet) but I feel bad killing mice and ants?

    Anyways, I guess this is just a rant, admitting guilt and trying to free myself of some of it. I should be writing a paper but... damn... I feel like shit.
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    May 14, 2010 1:29 AM GMT

    Lol, mice are mammals like you and I, a centipede isn't.

    Next time try this: a piece of real savoury cheese in the bottom of a fairly high pail. Make sure there's a way for the mouse to get to the lip. He may very well jump in and won;t be able to jump out. Then you can keep him a couple of days or until you can get to somewhere where there's food etc but NOT where he'll immediately be trapped and killed.

    Bill and I are just like you in your feelings. If we absolutely have to, we use regular old traps that most of the time kill instantly. The glue traps are incapable of that at any time. We also never use those black traps because they resemble food bowls for kitties and I'll stop there.

    -Doug
  • mcwclewis

    Posts: 1701

    May 14, 2010 1:34 AM GMT
    icon_razz.gif


    Yeah thats a really good idea.

    Someone, after all this, sent me a link to a page for a mousetrap that just shuts the mouse inside a little box. I guess it works pretty well. I might pick one up for future mouse issues. I guess all you have to do is put food in it and when they go in, a little panel shuts, and then all you have to do is open it up and let him go.


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    May 14, 2010 2:12 AM GMT
    Although I share the respect for nature and critters of all kinds, I do keep in mind the following:

    "Worldwide, rats and mice spread over 35 diseases. These diseases can be spread to humans directly, through handling of rodents, through contact with rodent feces, urine, or saliva, or through rodent bites. Diseases carried by rodents can also be spread to humans indirectly, through ticks, mites or fleas that have fed on an infected rodent." http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/

    AND....

    "We do not recommend using glue traps or live traps. These traps can scare mice that are caught live and cause them to urinate. Since their urine may contain germs, this may increase your risk of being exposed to diseases." http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/trap_up.html

    AND (lest we forget)...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death
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    May 14, 2010 2:29 AM GMT

    If the problem is just a single mouse, you can get a 'Have-a-heart' trap, catch the mouse and release it unharmed some distance from where you live.

    Ignoring the problem won't work. Trust me, I've tried that route twice. In London I ignored a mouse in the kitchen, which then became several mice, which in short order became a whole bunch of mice, that wouldn't even wait for me (or my guests) to go to bed before they ran around. In the end, I had to get an exterminated to go all 'Chemical Ali' on them.

    Then in the States I showed a similar lack of brutality. When confronted with an obvious horde of mice I insisted on the pest control company using 'Have-a-Heart traps', though the problem was clearly beyond that stage. I gave into to using lethal means against the mice when a very large (close to 6 ft) eastern milk snake took up residence in my kitchen.

    Since then I have acted more promptly to a mother raccoon and her seven babies, a skunk, and a couple of woodchucks, which meant I was able to relocate them rather than kill them.

    So, in these things, if you want to act humanely, act early.
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    May 14, 2010 2:30 AM GMT
    Oh and adding on to what GAMRican had to say: mice have no bladders, so they just leak urine wherever they go. (The things you learn from the exterminator.)
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    May 14, 2010 2:36 AM GMT
    With the return of all kinds of birds of prey in North America due to pesticide controls that address issues of sterility, mice are a vital food source for them. For this reason, letting him go in a non dense-urban area will mean he may mate and produce offspring for raptors of all kinds.

    -Doug
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    May 14, 2010 2:49 AM GMT
    mcwclewis saidAnyways, I guess this is just a rant, admitting guilt and trying to free myself of some of it. I should be writing a paper but... damn... I feel like shit.

    I've been there. In 1986 the Army gave me a huge old house on Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio in which to live, that actually had maid's quarters in it from a bygone era, a complete suite of rooms that I never managed to find any use for myself. The residence had been modernized in other ways, though, such as separate central AC units for both the upstairs and downstairs, but one thing they hadn't resolved was the age-old problem of rodents.

    So I went to the post Housing Office, and they issued me sticky traps for the attic, and poison bait for the detached garage out back. I'd never dealt with mice & rats in my life, but this is what the Army told me to do, so OK, I follow orders as always.

    A week or so later I went upstairs to the attic to check, and found an adult mouse and 5 or so babies, all dead in the glue. I was appalled. I took the tray to the post vet as I'd been told, so they could check the dead mice for disease.

    About the same time, I began to see dead rats in the garage. Apparently the poison caused them to hemorrhage internally, because they lay on the ground with blood coming from their mouths. I didn't touch them, and someone from the post vet's office came to remove them.

    Strange that all this bothered me, because I was trained to kill enemy soldiers without hesitation, but I didn't like this. Humans are full of contradictions. icon_confused.gif
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    May 14, 2010 4:03 AM GMT
    If a mouse steps within my domain, war will rage until the enemy has been slaughtered!

    Kill the damned mouse, they out number humans, they can spare a few lost souls!

    I recommend you read The Art of War by Sun Tzu, it's a smashing tale of a sorts icon_smile.gif and will help you plot and eventually win the war on infestations of any being, large or small.
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    May 14, 2010 5:03 AM GMT
    lilTanker said...I recommend you read The Art of War by Sun Tzu...


    A timeless and valuable tome. This is a read that will help anyone no matter what they may do in life, as it addresses fundamentals of strategy and tactics.

    I'm a civilized barbarian.