GRAMMAR Question: kids' toys or kid's toys?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 5:14 PM GMT
    Here's an example sentence:

    Kids' toys can be gigantic.

    Or is it:

    Kid's toys can be gigantic.

    Here's another one:

    ....like our parent's bikes. Or is it "like our parents' bikes."

    toys and bikes are plural, so I'd think it would come after the s.

  • nicelyproport...

    Posts: 573

    May 14, 2010 5:24 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidHere's an example sentence:

    Kids' toys can be gigantic.

    Or is it:

    Kid's toys can be gigantic.

    Here's another one:

    ....like our parent's bikes. Or is it "like our parents' bikes."

    toys and bikes are plural, so I'd think it would come after the s.



    kid's toys and parent's bikes are correct for a single kid and a single parent, respectively:

    These are my kid's toys. (These toys belong to my kid.)

    These are my parent's bikes. (These bikes belong to one of my two parents).

    kids' toys and parents' bikes are correct for more than one kid and more than one parent, respectively:

    These are my kids' toys. (These toys belong to my two or more kids.)

    These are my parents' bikes. (These bikes belong to my two parents.)

    Hope this helps!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 5:27 PM GMT
    To make is easier: One kid has toys. They are the kid's toys.
    Two kids have toys...they are the kids' toys.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 5:28 PM GMT
    Thank you kind sir! icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 5:48 PM GMT
    Friends is right. Think like this:

    [kid]´s toy is good = The toy belonging to the kid is good
    [kids]´ toy is good. = the toy belonging to the kids is good.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 6:18 PM GMT
    Somewhere awhile back I found an excellent web page explaining the proper use of the apostrophe in all sorts of situations. It gets confusing especially if the word you want to make plural already ends in the letter S.
    Thing is I read it and understood it but now I've gone forgotten it all and the site
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 7:55 PM GMT
    When indicating singular possession, the only people who get to drop the apostrophe-s for proper nouns ending in "s" are Jesus and Moses. In that case, you add an apostrophe and you're good to go. Everything else retains the final existing "s" and adds an apostrophe+s ('s) to the end to indicate possession.

    Moses' writings and Jesus' miracles. Carlos's golf clubs. Alexis's laptop.

    Hope that helps?
  • BarettaB80

    Posts: 141

    May 14, 2010 9:37 PM GMT
    MusicManYYC saidWhen indicating singular possession, the only people who get to drop the apostrophe-s for proper nouns ending in "s" are Jesus and Moses. In that case, you add an apostrophe and you're good to go. Everything else retains the final existing "s" and adds an apostrophe+s ('s) to the end to indicate possession.

    Moses' writings and Jesus' miracles. Carlos's golf clubs. Alexis's laptop.

    Hope that helps?


    Disagree.

    Those are Carlos' golf clubs, and Alexis' laptop.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 10:00 PM GMT
    My question pertained to a plural possesive of plural items.

    Hence, "like our parents' bikes"

    Multiple bikes owned by multiple parents
  • laxdude25

    Posts: 604

    May 14, 2010 10:05 PM GMT
    here you go:
    http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/apostro.asp
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    May 14, 2010 10:06 PM GMT
    nicelyproportioned said
    wrestlervic saidHere's an example sentence:

    Kids' toys can be gigantic.

    Or is it:

    Kid's toys can be gigantic.

    Here's another one:

    ....like our parent's bikes. Or is it "like our parents' bikes."

    toys and bikes are plural, so I'd think it would come after the s.



    kid's toys and parent's bikes are correct for a single kid and a single parent, respectively:

    These are my kid's toys. (These toys belong to my kid.)

    These are my parent's bikes. (These bikes belong to one of my two parents).

    kids' toys and parents' bikes are correct for more than one kid and more than one parent, respectively:

    These are my kids' toys. (These toys belong to my two or more kids.)

    These are my parents' bikes. (These bikes belong to my two parents.)

    Hope this helps!



    QFT. This is a correct explanation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2010 11:03 PM GMT
    http://www.apostropheabuse.com/
  • DrewT

    Posts: 1327

    May 14, 2010 11:10 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidMy question pertained to a plural possesive of plural items.

    Hence, "like our parents' bikes"

    Multiple bikes owned by multiple parents


    Don't worry about the multiple possessions, worry about the multiple people possessing. That makes it much easier to deal with, regardless of the amount they possess.

    Kid's singular possessive
    Kids' plural possessive

    Parent's singular possessive (usually we just say mom or dad for singular purposes)
    Parents' plural possessive

    So, the kids' owned a hammock. (multiple kids, one hammock). My parents' house (the house my parents own).
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    May 14, 2010 11:12 PM GMT
    Couldn't find an image of it to show...
    but the Ford Taurus SES......on the back of the car, the emblem looks like they are plural posessive-ing the singular word "Taurus"....where you double the "s" and add "es" ::Grin::
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    May 14, 2010 11:17 PM GMT
    StudlyScrewRite said Couldn't find an image of it to show...
    but the Ford Taurus SES......on the back of the car, the emblem looks like they are plural posessive-ing the singular word "Taurus"....where you double the "s" and add "es" ::Grin::


    Wouldn't that be Toroids? icon_wink.gif JUST kidding.
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    May 14, 2010 11:48 PM GMT
    I thought you had to be 18 or older to join RJ...
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    May 14, 2010 11:48 PM GMT
    Rule of thumb ......

    You cannot put an 's for a possessive after an "S"
    That goes for anything plural with an "S"
    like boys
    monkeys
    or politicians
    but you can
    for plural that don't end with "S"
    Like geese
    people
    and children

    You will also leave off the "S" in the possessive tense when the name ends with "S"
    as in ... It's Gladys' piano



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 12:46 AM GMT
    Efebo saidI thought you had to be 18 or older to join RJ...


    You look like a girl in that picture. icon_wink.gif
  • LaxJock16

    Posts: 784

    May 15, 2010 12:57 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidHere's an example sentence:

    Kids' toys can be gigantic.

    Or is it:

    Kid's toys can be gigantic.

    Here's another one:

    ....like our parent's bikes. Or is it "like our parents' bikes."

    toys and bikes are plural, so I'd think it would come after the s.



    The proper form is "kids' toys can be gigantic," due to there being many toys and thus belonging to many kids. If it belonged to one kid it would read "the kid's toy is gigantic." The only way toys would be possessive is if the it was a description of the toy or a facet belonging to the toy. Also use the word bicycles instead of bikes, it just is a better word choice bike means many things (motorcycles, mountain bikes, road bikes, etc...) Bicycle implies it is one that is not motorized. But other than that your last sentence was correct just needs a word choice change.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 15, 2010 2:07 AM GMT
    When you use 's, it means that you left out at least one letter, for instance:
    it's = it is
    you'll = you will

    However, the dog ate its food does not use an apostrophe at all.

    's can also mean possession, for instance:
    Joe's dog means that the dog belongs to Joe.

    If the word already has an s at the end of it, then you place the apostrophe after the s, for instance:

    My parents' car means that the car belongs to your parents.

    However, the mens room doesn't use an apostrophe at all.

    If I left anything out, I'm sure that somebody will jump in with both feet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 2:10 AM GMT
    kids' toys = toys belonging to a group of them

    kid's toys = toys belonging to one brat in particular

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 2:13 AM GMT
    Love a man with proper grammatical skills. It's so damn sexy and it turns me on so damn much.

    OH MY GOD! Talk proper to me, you English major. Make me know the difference between "it's" and "its". The way you use possessive words rings my bell.

    MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 15, 2010 2:14 AM GMT
    "So, the kids' owned a hammock. (multiple kids, one hammock).
    ____________________________________________________
    Actually, it should be
    So, the kids owned a hammock.

    Or, you could say
    The kids' hammock. (meaning more than one kid owned the hammock)
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    May 15, 2010 2:16 AM GMT
    wrestlervic said
    StudlyScrewRite said Couldn't find an image of it to show...
    but the Ford Taurus SES......on the back of the car, the emblem looks like they are plural posessive-ing the singular word "Taurus"....where you double the "s" and add "es" ::Grin::


    Wouldn't that be Toroids? icon_wink.gif JUST kidding.


    Perhaps the plural is Tauri.

  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 15, 2010 2:17 AM GMT
    BarettaB80 said
    MusicManYYC saidWhen indicating singular possession, the only people who get to drop the apostrophe-s for proper nouns ending in "s" are Jesus and Moses. In that case, you add an apostrophe and you're good to go. Everything else retains the final existing "s" and adds an apostrophe+s ('s) to the end to indicate possession.

    Moses' writings and Jesus' miracles. Carlos's golf clubs. Alexis's laptop.

    Hope that helps?


    Disagree.

    Those are Carlos' golf clubs, and Alexis' laptop.




    I agree with BarettaB80
    Those are Carlos' golf clubs, and Alexis' laptop.