Clothing Line???

  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    May 15, 2010 2:37 AM GMT
    OK. So, I've never been a fashionista. In fact, My personal style could probably be defined as terminally straight, but I had a moment of inspiration recently and am actually considering designing a fashion line geared toward 20 something women (black women in particular). As I said, I am no fashionista and can barely draw a stick figure, much less sketch clothing, but I have an inspiration stuck in my head and feel the need to act on this. The business minded side of me says that it could be a success, if designed and advertised correctly, but there is another side of me that says that fashion is not in my wheelhouse.

    Advice? Comments? Bitchy criticism/dream dashing?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 6:01 AM GMT
    Sounds like a pipe dream. Sorry. No offense, but if you have no prior predisposition or inkling towards this field you'll only be clutching at straws.
  • HankFit247

    Posts: 205

    May 15, 2010 6:06 AM GMT
    Sorry, but I agree with Genymede80.

    Depending on your geographic location, find a fashion student friend who can turn your concepts into drawings, and proceed from there.

    Far easier to sell drawings than a concept.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 8:33 AM GMT
    I've been designing for 2 years and had to have an education, as a matter of fact, Im preparing my portfolio to go back to school, different one though, switching my major to fashion and finish my BFA. I've done my own shows and have produced others and am happy with the results i keep getting and I know what I talk about when i say its HARD HARD HARD work, but fun... and with the right people, you'll get there.

    Fashion is THE most competitive career. Even though with my Architecture and Photography background, I still had a humongo passion for fashion and have been exposed to it for the longest, and I believe I DO indeed have a great vision as to what to expect from my label, however it's easier said, than done.

    You not only have to posses the business basics as to demographics, but it goes beyond that...you must MUST posses a creative vision of what a collection is DONE without even having a piece of fabric in your hand. You must know the technical stuff of construction...at least the basic, YOU MUST know, because if you trust your label to seamstress and tailors, you really don't know much about what you did.

    Aside from the creative vision, and the business aspect, there is also direction and production. A label is no easy thing at ALL. Just an average for you to get an idea of how complicated it is:

    A 17 piece woman's collection in New York,...let's say 8 models all wearing just one top and trousers, no gowns, just a COUPLE as in two cocktail dresses, fabric, the cost of materials to sketch, render and the cost of fabric, notions/accessories, plus the cost of equipment, plus help [you need at least one experienced seamstress to HELP] alone with that..if you want a decent to good quality, we're talking about $20,000.00

    Cost of production as in venue to do your show,
    the models themselves [NOT CONSIDERING MODELS FROM EXPENSIVE AGENCIES LIKE FORD, WILHELMINA, ELITE, DNA...etc] Hair and Make Up,
    Dressers [Helpers to get your models changed]
    Guest LIsts,
    Invitations,
    Press and Media outlets,
    Gift Bags [Super tacky if you dont have something for the guests]
    Security

    and theres some plusses in there THAT alone can be anywhere from 50-80,000 dollars, and you might be better off hiring a Fashion Producer.

    Marketing and Campaigns costs involve models, hair and make up plus photographers, props and outlets for advertising at the right place... we;re talking about 10,000 just for one photo shoot.

    So... BeingThePhoenix Fashions Spring/Summer 2011 for this September will have costed you at least $90,000 dollars and 5 hardcore working months, with 21 hour days on average per week of work, for just a 3 minute walk of Fashion.


    Loving it?
    Thought so... ;)


    But hey, EVERYTHING is born with an idea, conceived into concept, raised as a goal, and made into a reality...Just remember there's only ONE rule here..its not always WHAT you know, but WHO you know. ;)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 9:36 AM GMT
    ItsJhonnyBam saidI've been designing for 2 years and had to have an education, as a matter of fact, Im preparing my portfolio to go back to school, different one though, switching my major to fashion and finish my BFA. I've done my own shows and have produced others and am happy with the results i keep getting and I know what I talk about when i say its HARD HARD HARD work, but fun... and with the right people, you'll get there.

    Fashion is THE most competitive career. Even though with my Architecture and Photography background, I still had a humongo passion for fashion and have been exposed to it for the longest, and I believe I DO indeed have a great vision as to what to expect from my label, however it's easier said, than done.

    You not only have to posses the business basics as to demographics, but it goes beyond that...you must MUST posses a creative vision of what a collection is DONE without even having a piece of fabric in your hand. You must know the technical stuff of construction...at least the basic, YOU MUST know, because if you trust your label to seamstress and tailors, you really don't know much about what you did.

    Aside from the creative vision, and the business aspect, there is also direction and production. A label is no easy thing at ALL. Just an average for you to get an idea of how complicated it is:

    A 17 piece woman's collection in New York,...let's say 8 models all wearing just one top and trousers, no gowns, just a COUPLE as in two cocktail dresses, fabric, the cost of materials to sketch, render and the cost of fabric, notions/accessories, plus the cost of equipment, plus help [you need at least one experienced seamstress to HELP] alone with that..if you want a decent to good quality, we're talking about $20,000.00

    Cost of production as in venue to do your show,
    the models themselves [NOT CONSIDERING MODELS FROM EXPENSIVE AGENCIES LIKE FORD, WILHELMINA, ELITE, DNA...etc] Hair and Make Up,
    Dressers [Helpers to get your models changed]
    Guest LIsts,
    Invitations,
    Press and Media outlets,
    Gift Bags [Super tacky if you dont have something for the guests]
    Security

    and theres some plusses in there THAT alone can be anywhere from 50-80,000 dollars, and you might be better off hiring a Fashion Producer.

    Marketing and Campaigns costs involve models, hair and make up plus photographers, props and outlets for advertising at the right place... we;re talking about 10,000 just for one photo shoot.

    So... BeingThePhoenix Fashions Spring/Summer 2011 for this September will have costed you at least $90,000 dollars and 5 hardcore working months, with 21 hour days on average per week of work, for just a 3 minute walk of Fashion.


    Loving it?
    Thought so... ;)


    But hey, EVERYTHING is born with an idea, conceived into concept, raised as a goal, and made into a reality...Just remember there's only ONE rule here..its not always WHAT you know, but WHO you know. ;)



    Sounds horrible! lol
  • Space_Cowboy_...

    Posts: 3738

    May 15, 2010 10:01 AM GMT
    Well it takes a lot to get stuff out there, and you have to know people, it's 40% talent 60% who you know.
  • josephmovie

    Posts: 533

    May 15, 2010 10:56 AM GMT
    You have an idea. Do some research and see what else is out there - what can you do that's different? Don't give up just yet, because once you start having a look around your idea may change into something else.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 11:36 AM GMT
    I've spent my whole adult life starting and operating new businesses.

    Additionally, I have worked at the officer level (CIO) for one of the biggest multi-national fashion companies in Italy.

    I always found the story of my boss and mentor, the founder of the company, to be emblematic of the entrepreneurial mentality.

    When he and his family (two brothers and a sister) started their company they were really dirt poor. When I say poor I mean poor as in they did not have food to eat, transportation, etc.

    The sister and the mother started knitting sweaters and my boss went around trying to convince people to buy them. He literally carried them in the basket of his bicycle.

    Working at this, they eventually found a way to get their product into one shop in a fashionable ski resort up in the Italian alps. My old boss literally rode his bicycle about 150 miles with the original merchandise in order to get it displayed.

    As it turned out, people really liked there product and little by little it started to sell. A couple of years later they opened their own store.

    My old boss/mentor is now 76. In the course of his lifetime he has gone from not having enough money to buy a salami to feed his family to sitting on top of an empire. In fact, the clothing business is the lesser part of that ecosystem. Still, in the clothing business alone they turn over in excess of $2 Billion a year on 120 million garments annually distributed in 130 countries. When I was there I was responsible for nearly 5000 employees.

    My boss/mentor was Luciano Benetton.

    Here is another one from my personal experience. After I graduated from high school I went to the University of Texas at Austin. As it turned out I was a very impatient kid, not all that interested in school. My dream had really been to get into business.

    My best friend's mother had been assistant to the president of the Datapoint corporation in San Antonio. Her husband taught technicians to climb telephone poles for Southwestern Bell. Eventually my best friend's
    dad got a good offer to move from San Antonio to the HQ of Southwestern Bell in Austin. His mother left her job at Datapoint.

    They moved to Austin and she decided she would retire. They bought a plot of land in a place called Lago Vista and she started to build their retirement home. This woman had been working her whole life as a secretary and she basically got bored with the idea of sitting around and staring at a golf course.

    She asked her son (Mahlon) and I if we knew of any tech companies in Austin where she might find a job as a secretary.

    We did know one guy who was a student with us living in the dorms at UT. This was the early 1980's and there had been a great deal of economic upheaval in the first years of the Reagan presidency. Many companies had gone bankrupt. This kid that Mahlon and I knew had developed a small business where he was buying the inventories of failed computer stores from bankruptcy auctions. He was then reselling those computers at a small profit out of the back of hobby magazines.

    We introduced him to Mahlon's mother and they hit it off. Unfortunately, the kid didn't have any money to actually pay her, but he promised to pay her in stock when they hit it big. Kay (the mother) was OK with that because she was mostly just bored. As it happened, she did have an enormous amount of experience working in a computer company.

    Eventually she followed this kid until he decided to change the business from buying bankruptcies to actually just buying parts and assembling the computers to order. He started a business called P.C.s Limited. At the time the new company was founded Kay received a substantial block of stock in the new venture. P.C.s Limited was a huge success.

    My favorite story was when the telephone rang and it was the chairman of the Sony Corporation calling. Kay actually thought that was a prank call and hung up on the Japanese twice!

    The moral of the story is that this bit of serendipity turns out to be the story of the birth of the Dell Computer Corporation. The kid my friend and I knew was Michael Dell.

    The work that Kay did practically for free ended up making her in excess of $50 Million in stock value over the course of her long career with M.D.

    Let me finish this by telling you about something I recently heard about. I was not involved in this in any way. There is some kid in London (I don't remember his name) who has been making t-shirts. It was a very small business with just a couple of hundred quid in investment. He reasoned that if he could get any celebrity to wear his t-shirts that he would have a shot.

    He hit on the idea of putting the t-shirts on a hanger and just pegging them to the fence of Madonna's townhouse. As I understood it her kids came out, saw these t-shirts, liked them, and started to wear them. Eventually Madge herself caught onto the thing, got in touch with the kid, and started to wear them herself.

    His £200 investment paid off through cleverness and chutzpah and now the guy has a real business on his hands.

    So, suffice it to say that I absolutely don't agree with any of the naysayers here. There are absolutely no prerequisites to starting a business. You just have to start off in the direction of what you want to do and keep walking. Eventually you will find the right opportunity. The project may not turn out exactly as you envisioned, but when you are trying to get to something the process is really the important thing. The thing that will be successful may be the original idea or, more likely, it may be a by product of what you started to do (an opportunity that you spy along the way).





  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 11:47 AM GMT
    450px-Clothes_line_with_pegs_nearby.jpg


    What? He said....?

    ....oh. Never mind.
    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 12:00 PM GMT
    Wow, Ursa Major. We need more stories like those on RJ.

    Had a feeling the computers story was Dell, but the Benetton part was surprising. $2 billion in sales even though they're not as popular now? I'm assuming you're referring to brands they bought, cause the Benetton label itself doesn't seem like the big deal it once was.

    Btw, if you do have an in with Michael Dell, please let him know their customer support needs a major overhaul. Dell makes great computers, but their customer support (particularly, the calls routed overseas), is possibly the worst of any company today.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 12:18 PM GMT
    Actually I was referring to Benetton Group (clothing). The diversified holdings are in a different company called Edizione Holdings, which owns an incredible variety of things including the Italian highway system, most of the train stations, about half of the airports, etc.

    The clothing brand isn't very big in the U.S. anymore. In recent years the company has been growing in Asia and South America. That said, it is true that the brand isn't what it once was. They have a very vertical manufacturing model that is old fashioned and not as rapid as competitors like H&M and Zara. Also, the founders have all finally gone into retirement. The second generation just doesn't have the same feeling for the business (as is so often the case).




    SeaSon saidWow, Ursa Major. We need more stories like those on RJ.

    Had a feeling the computers story was Dell, but the Benetton part was surprising. $2 billion in sales even though they're not as popular now? I'm assuming you're referring to brands they bought, cause the Benetton label itself doesn't seem like the big deal it once was.

    Btw, if you do have an in with Michael Dell, please let him know their customer support needs a major overhaul. Dell makes great computers, but their customer support (particularly, the calls routed overseas), is possibly the worst of any company today.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 12:27 PM GMT
    Makes sense. I remember their provocative ads from the 90s. Particularly the ones with the patient dying of AIDS and the black mother breastfeeding a white baby. Never really tried their clothes, though (mainly wanted a beach towel... :-) ), but just recently decided to and they're much more traditional than I expected.

    Second generations do tend to lack the skills of founding generations, but at least they have it easy...
  • flashed

    Posts: 11

    May 15, 2010 12:37 PM GMT
    i agree with the "great bear in the sky' not to be too affected by naysayers. I suggest that you might cultivate a group of black female friends (if you don't already have them) that could give you feedback on whether your ideas will fly ('fly' not an effort at being hip). If you need some samples for ideas, go to a thrift store and get some similar material (old blouses, skirts, dresses), then pin or sew them (if you can), paint, glue stuff on, etc. to at least get your idea across visually. Good luck.
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    May 15, 2010 6:40 PM GMT
    Meyor saidLearn how to attract any straight, bi or gay man. Gone are the days of having to put up with second best. Why only get what is offered to you, when you can be the guy who gets to choose? You'll be able to choose from the most handsome man you want!


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  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    May 16, 2010 1:08 AM GMT
    UrsaMajor saidI've spent my whole adult life starting and operating new businesses.

    Additionally, I have worked at the officer level (CIO) for one of the biggest multi-national fashion companies in Italy.

    I always found the story of my boss and mentor, the founder of the company, to be emblematic of the entrepreneurial mentality.

    When he and his family (two brothers and a sister) started their company they were really dirt poor. When I say poor I mean poor as in they did not have food to eat, transportation, etc.

    The sister and the mother started knitting sweaters and my boss went around trying to convince people to buy them. He literally carried them in the basket of his bicycle.

    Working at this, they eventually found a way to get their product into one shop in a fashionable ski resort up in the Italian alps. My old boss literally rode his bicycle about 150 miles with the original merchandise in order to get it displayed.

    As it turned out, people really liked there product and little by little it started to sell. A couple of years later they opened their own store.

    My old boss/mentor is now 76. In the course of his lifetime he has gone from not having enough money to buy a salami to feed his family to sitting on top of an empire. In fact, the clothing business is the lesser part of that ecosystem. Still, in the clothing business alone they turn over in excess of $2 Billion a year on 120 million garments annually distributed in 130 countries. When I was there I was responsible for nearly 5000 employees.

    My boss/mentor was Luciano Benetton.

    Here is another one from my personal experience. After I graduated from high school I went to the University of Texas at Austin. As it turned out I was a very impatient kid, not all that interested in school. My dream had really been to get into business.

    My best friend's mother had been assistant to the president of the Datapoint corporation in San Antonio. Her husband taught technicians to climb telephone poles for Southwestern Bell. Eventually my best friend's
    dad got a good offer to move from San Antonio to the HQ of Southwestern Bell in Austin. His mother left her job at Datapoint.

    They moved to Austin and she decided she would retire. They bought a plot of land in a place called Lago Vista and she started to build their retirement home. This woman had been working her whole life as a secretary and she basically got bored with the idea of sitting around and staring at a golf course.

    She asked her son (Mahlon) and I if we knew of any tech companies in Austin where she might find a job as a secretary.

    We did know one guy who was a student with us living in the dorms at UT. This was the early 1980's and there had been a great deal of economic upheaval in the first years of the Reagan presidency. Many companies had gone bankrupt. This kid that Mahlon and I knew had developed a small business where he was buying the inventories of failed computer stores from bankruptcy auctions. He was then reselling those computers at a small profit out of the back of hobby magazines.

    We introduced him to Mahlon's mother and they hit it off. Unfortunately, the kid didn't have any money to actually pay her, but he promised to pay her in stock when they hit it big. Kay (the mother) was OK with that because she was mostly just bored. As it happened, she did have an enormous amount of experience working in a computer company.

    Eventually she followed this kid until he decided to change the business from buying bankruptcies to actually just buying parts and assembling the computers to order. He started a business called P.C.s Limited. At the time the new company was founded Kay received a substantial block of stock in the new venture. P.C.s Limited was a huge success.

    My favorite story was when the telephone rang and it was the chairman of the Sony Corporation calling. Kay actually thought that was a prank call and hung up on the Japanese twice!

    The moral of the story is that this bit of serendipity turns out to be the story of the birth of the Dell Computer Corporation. The kid my friend and I knew was Michael Dell.

    The work that Kay did practically for free ended up making her in excess of $50 Million in stock value over the course of her long career with M.D.

    Let me finish this by telling you about something I recently heard about. I was not involved in this in any way. There is some kid in London (I don't remember his name) who has been making t-shirts. It was a very small business with just a couple of hundred quid in investment. He reasoned that if he could get any celebrity to wear his t-shirts that he would have a shot.

    He hit on the idea of putting the t-shirts on a hanger and just pegging them to the fence of Madonna's townhouse. As I understood it her kids came out, saw these t-shirts, liked them, and started to wear them. Eventually Madge herself caught onto the thing, got in touch with the kid, and started to wear them herself.

    His £200 investment paid off through cleverness and chutzpah and now the guy has a real business on his hands.

    So, suffice it to say that I absolutely don't agree with any of the naysayers here. There are absolutely no prerequisites to starting a business. You just have to start off in the direction of what you want to do and keep walking. Eventually you will find the right opportunity. The project may not turn out exactly as you envisioned, but when you are trying to get to something the process is really the important thing. The thing that will be successful may be the original idea or, more likely, it may be a by product of what you started to do (an opportunity that you spy along the way).


    Fashion is definitely not my passion. Business, on the other hand, is my passion. I am currently running a business for someone else. It has certainly been a learning experience, but I don't want to continue making money for other people, when I could be applying that focus and effort to making money for myself and following my own interests. I just wonder if my first business should be something I have a bit more experience with. I have several business ideas that could potentially be very profitable, but this one is the first one that I actually got excited about in quite a while.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 16, 2010 1:16 AM GMT
    ItsJhonnyBam saidI've been designing for 2 years and had to have an education, as a matter of fact, Im preparing my portfolio to go back to school, different one though, switching my major to fashion and finish my BFA. I've done my own shows and have produced others and am happy with the results i keep getting and I know what I talk about when i say its HARD HARD HARD work, but fun... and with the right people, you'll get there.

    Fashion is THE most competitive career. Even though with my Architecture and Photography background, I still had a humongo passion for fashion and have been exposed to it for the longest, and I believe I DO indeed have a great vision as to what to expect from my label, however it's easier said, than done.

    You not only have to posses the business basics as to demographics, but it goes beyond that...you must MUST posses a creative vision of what a collection is DONE without even having a piece of fabric in your hand. You must know the technical stuff of construction...at least the basic, YOU MUST know, because if you trust your label to seamstress and tailors, you really don't know much about what you did.

    Aside from the creative vision, and the business aspect, there is also direction and production. A label is no easy thing at ALL. Just an average for you to get an idea of how complicated it is:

    A 17 piece woman's collection in New York,...let's say 8 models all wearing just one top and trousers, no gowns, just a COUPLE as in two cocktail dresses, fabric, the cost of materials to sketch, render and the cost of fabric, notions/accessories, plus the cost of equipment, plus help [you need at least one experienced seamstress to HELP] alone with that..if you want a decent to good quality, we're talking about $20,000.00

    Cost of production as in venue to do your show,
    the models themselves [NOT CONSIDERING MODELS FROM EXPENSIVE AGENCIES LIKE FORD, WILHELMINA, ELITE, DNA...etc] Hair and Make Up,
    Dressers [Helpers to get your models changed]
    Guest LIsts,
    Invitations,
    Press and Media outlets,
    Gift Bags [Super tacky if you dont have something for the guests]
    Security

    and theres some plusses in there THAT alone can be anywhere from 50-80,000 dollars, and you might be better off hiring a Fashion Producer.

    Marketing and Campaigns costs involve models, hair and make up plus photographers, props and outlets for advertising at the right place... we;re talking about 10,000 just for one photo shoot.

    So... BeingThePhoenix Fashions Spring/Summer 2011 for this September will have costed you at least $90,000 dollars and 5 hardcore working months, with 21 hour days on average per week of work, for just a 3 minute walk of Fashion.


    Loving it?
    Thought so... ;)


    But hey, EVERYTHING is born with an idea, conceived into concept, raised as a goal, and made into a reality...Just remember there's only ONE rule here..its not always WHAT you know, but WHO you know. ;)

    BeingThePhoenix, listen to this man. He speaks the truth.
  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    May 16, 2010 1:18 AM GMT
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 16, 2010 1:27 AM GMT
    Not sure I follow the logic that says that business has everything to do with following our passion. In my experience business has been about openness to opportunity and about the willingness to seize opportunity.

    Neither do I buy the business about prior experience, education, etc. Actually, no one is prepared for all of the demands and requirements of a start up business. No matter what we think will happen the reality is always different. This is one of the things I say most often to my clients, if you write a business plan you have, in fact, written a prescription for what won't happen.

    I think the key to any of this is to start toward your idea. Usually that is a no cost pursuit. Along the way, as you investigate, develop, and try to realize your plans you will run across obstacles and opportunities.

    If you are really flexible and open minded then you will learn to recognize what you can actually realize out of your original inspiration. It is almost certain that you won't end up doing what you first started out to do, but that won't matter on the other end.

    You have nothing to lose by trying to follow your inspiration. The worst thing that can happen is that you will learn more about business and about yourself.


    Being the Phoenix said "Fashion is definitely not my passion. Business, on the other hand, is my passion. I am currently running a business for someone else. It has certainly been a learning experience, but I don't want to continue making money for other people, when I could be applying that focus and effort to making money for myself and following my own interests. I just wonder if my first business should be something I have a bit more experience with. I have several business ideas that could potentially be very profitable, but this one is the first one that I actually got excited about in quite a while."
  • Space_Cowboy_...

    Posts: 3738

    May 16, 2010 1:29 AM GMT
    KARATE1974 said




    OMG that was so bad ass
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 16, 2010 1:47 AM GMT
    I think you should go for it. And here is how:

    Design some kick-ass clothing, actually make it, and give it to some key women to wear. If it's good enough, their friends will want it. Fuck giving your ideas to some design firm; actually MAKE it and get it worn. It may catch on like wildfire. You'll never know until you try! icon_wink.gif

    OK, now my criticism. That is SO gay! icon_wink.gif
  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    May 16, 2010 1:55 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidI think you should go for it. And here is how:

    Design some kick-ass clothing, actually make it, and give it to some key women to wear. If it's good enough, their friends will want it. Fuck giving your ideas to some design firm; actually MAKE it and get it worn. It may catch on like wildfire. You'll never know until you try! icon_wink.gif

    OK, now my criticism. That is SO gay! icon_wink.gif

    Actually, this is pretty much the direction I had envisioned. And, for the criticism: I know. Like, Totally...Right? LOL.icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 17, 2010 6:03 AM GMT
    Let's be totally honest Ursa... if many other people had stories to tell such as yours, many designers and their labels will still be in business.

    I'm not saying they never happen, I'm just saying they RARELY happen. It's an exception. You really have to be realistic in this particular business,...it is what it is.

    It's true 40% Talent 60% Contacts... but Im feeling bold today.
    20% Talent and 80% Contacts.

    Lets be be realistic, you MUST count with capital IN ANY business, even if its a loan, YOU, MUST, HAVE, YOUR, OWN, MONEY, TO, SPEND. Investors are not always interested in YOUR talent specifically, once they buy all your shares, they name others Creative Director's of your label if you are not producing them the amount they want, as it happened with Jil Sander, who was bought off her own label by the PRADA Group and was replace by Raf Simons. If you want to keep your company, investors never really guarantee you a happy retirement.

    Even if you were triple Gwashdamn poor when you initiated your business, you had to sacrifice something worth a lot to you,...be it time, effort or whatever, the point being, YOU have to give the first step to invest.

    and I may not be CEO, CFO or any three letter positions beginning with C, but one thing is for sure, if you want to stay alive in this business, be ready to have 1) Connections 2) Money 3) Plan A B C D E F -Z ready. Period.
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    May 17, 2010 6:19 AM GMT
    UrsaMajor saidNot sure I follow the logic that says that business has everything to do with following our passion. In my experience business has been about openness to opportunity and about the willingness to seize opportunity.

    Neither do I buy the business about prior experience, education, etc. Actually, no one is prepared for all of the demands and requirements of a start up business. No matter what we think will happen the reality is always different. This is one of the things I say most often to my clients, if you write a business plan you have, in fact, written a prescription for what won't happen.

    I think the key to any of this is to start toward your idea. Usually that is a no cost pursuit. Along the way, as you investigate, develop, and try to realize your plans you will run across obstacles and opportunities.

    If you are really flexible and open minded then you will learn to recognize what you can actually realize out of your original inspiration. It is almost certain that you won't end up doing what you first started out to do, but that won't matter on the other end.

    You have nothing to lose by trying to follow your inspiration. The worst thing that can happen is that you will learn more about business and about yourself.







    Oh careful hun the rock you through indirectly to me landed in the water and splashed some on my face....




    Well obviously you MUST run the most successful business in the world if this is your game plan... and that itself IS a business plan.

    You can ask ALL the major houses and they will tell you that they INDEED do have certain guidelines they attain to.

    You can't just expect to poop a successful business just by being open. I'm open to RuPaul singing during my fashion shows at the Notre Dame Cathedral with front row VIP seating guests, Sarah Palin... but that doesn't make it something logic NOR successful.

    Experience and Education DO matter, and DO count. True you NEVER know what will happen, but fashion is always about NOT compromising your initial vision. Chanel is known because of Gabrielle's legacy and refined elegance. Not because Karl Lagerfeld was just so cool did he get Creative Direction at Chanel. He knew the history of its designer and the past designers as well as Chief Executives and analyzed closely the situation. He designs to the needs and the expectations of the Chanel label. The open part comes in by Lagerfeld adding his touch to things.


    Gucci Prior to Tom Ford was bad. Gucci was always known as being a very seductive and sexy label. Tom Ford comes in and REcreates their image [obviously based on a previous plan and experience and education of the labels history] and turned Gucci into one of THE most important and expensive labels ever. Now that Gianini has it, it has been struggling in many senses.

    And Im sure that there are MANY MANY more stories with such an unhappy ending, that when you think about it, they failed because they were too open [i call it greedy] that their original vision and concept were heavily compromised.

    I would much rather wait 10 years to get my label out there but have its DNA strongly built and last couple more decades, than making a precipitated move in 10 months and last no more than a couple of years.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 17, 2010 2:27 PM GMT
    Do it.

    Don't blow so much money and resources on it that you can't support yourself.

    But go for it,

    if you mess up you mess up but it will be a fun story.

    I realize, there is so much in life I did not do because it didn't seem pratical. Because I thought I would fail. And its gotten me no where.

    I have a sargent on the other hand that does everything he wants to. Shirt businesses, record companies, all sorts of stuff. And yes they don't always turn out well, but he makes a lot of friends from it, a lot of networking and if anything, all of his endeavors were an experience.

    So try it. See how it goes. It may change your life, it may not, but it will be an experience.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2010 12:11 PM GMT
    Jhonny said - "Oh careful hun the rock you through indirectly to me landed in the water and splashed some on my face...."

    Yeah, well, actually that was not my intention at all. I really get that you're into what happens in the galaxy of Paris and Milano, and I am happy for you.

    This is a world that I happen to know a tiny something about. The truths are rather more brutal than even you imagine.

    BtP said nothing about wanting to become design director a major Paris house. He said he wants to start his own business, based upon his own intuition about the desires of 20 something women.

    Neither did I suggest that starting a business, any business, is easy.

    If you want to extrapolate what I did say about a mental approach to opportunity, to contract negotiations between Tom Ford, Domenico del Sole, and Francois Pinault, then we really don't have too much to discuss. One has absolutely nothing to do with the other.

    No matter what, I would still advocate that anyone who is appropriately driven build their own business without regard to conventional wisdom.