RollerBlades, What's Best?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2010 8:51 PM GMT
    I just went for a walk in Central Park and convinced myself to buy some rollerblades, any tips on the types, kinds, brands? Is there are difference between the $300 ones and the $80 ones?
  • Devoted

    Posts: 8

    May 16, 2010 2:21 AM GMT
    xuaerb: I have had types from $15 to $80, and I haven't really seen any difference between them. Personally, I have had the same set for close to 12 years and used them like they were going out of style. The name of the set I have is Competitive Edge and they are amazing. They are very comfortable; the extensions that move up the leg reach the bottom of my calf muscle, which gives excellent ankle support; and the wheels move so smoothly across the ground no matter what the terrain is. By the way, the ones I have only cost like $45 at either Walmart or Target, I think. Like I said, it's been close to 12 years now, so I may be wrong. Hopefully this helps in your decision making icon_smile.gif
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    May 16, 2010 3:08 AM GMT
    I've "tried" both price ranges. Never bought my own pair (because I suck at it) but there is a big difference in comfort.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    May 16, 2010 3:23 AM GMT
    Joke my friend told me:

    "What's the hardest thing about rollerblading?"
    "Telling your parent's you're gay."
    icon_lol.gif

    661.web.gay10.rollerblade.jpg
  • Devoted

    Posts: 8

    May 16, 2010 4:13 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidI've "tried" both price ranges. Never bought my own pair (because I suck at it) but there is a big difference in comfort.


    paulflexes:

    Good point. I know the cheaper ones I had when I was younger were not as comfortable as the more expensive ones I purchased when I got older. This would be left to say that if I were to spend more on rollerblades they could or would be even more comfortable than the ones I own now. So, as you may due when purchasing anything else, try them on; test them out; see if they have a return policy for them if they are not what you were looking for in rollerblades.
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    May 16, 2010 4:32 AM GMT
    a lot of the times the wheels are a big difference, i bought myself a pair at my local Academt sports store, cost me 70 bucks, i forget what brand they are, but theyre incredibly comfortable, if i were to buy new wheels for them id have no complaints icon_smile.gif.

    ive tried the expensive ones and i personally think theyre very similar besides the comfort and fit of the inside.
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    May 16, 2010 4:43 AM GMT
    Don't know if they still make them anymore, but I have a paid of Salomon (same company that makes skis/boots) and love them. They were almost $300 I think, but well worth it for the reasons above (wheels/construction of the boot/ankle support)
  • HankFit247

    Posts: 205

    May 16, 2010 4:46 AM GMT
    Go to one of the Sporting Goods Chains, and you will see a big difference in comfort. Brand RollerBlade is he best, and only brand I will ever buy. Buy the boot with the best comfort. You can swap your wheels and bearings for better speed.

    Learn to Rotate/Swap/Exchange your wheels for even wear. I perform this every 15/30 miles.

    Ceramic Bearings are best, but steel will do your first season or two.

    Skip the $30 can of oil, WD-40 works just as well.

    Dicks Sporting Goods
    Sports Authority
    Some board shops (skate board) still sell/carry them.

    I prefer 80mm wheels, versus the standard 72mm

    Bored with your sport, Invest in better toysicon_exclaim.gif
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    May 16, 2010 4:54 AM GMT
    I use Rollerblade brand. Suggest you find ones that don't give blisters and yet give foot and ankle good support - same as runners or skates. As you probably don't want to buy multi brands make sure you give them a good try in the store, have the socks you will wear. And as has been said, the wheels/bearings make a difference.
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    May 16, 2010 4:56 AM GMT
    Bunjamon saidJoke my friend told me:

    "What's the hardest thing about rollerblading?"
    "Telling your parent's you're gay."
    icon_lol.gif

    661.web.gay10.rollerblade.jpg



    LOL - he should have worn blue gear to coordinate with his blades icon_lol.gif or changed his blades for ones that coordinated with his gear.

    The Gay Fashion Police
  • Sk8Tex

    Posts: 738

    May 16, 2010 5:47 AM GMT
    Finally a topic I can chime in on. I have been skating since I was 6 years old so about 24 years now and I think I've literally tried them all. Ive stuck by the last pair I got for about 7 years now (K2s) I got lucky and found at the swap meet. Theyre kind of on the expensive side though...but I lucked out and bought em from some dude for $25 that didnt know any better I guess. Range of motion was important to me so I went with more of a hockey style skate (short top, lace up with traps for extra snugness.)

    What I have noticed about the cheaper skates is they are very stiff hard plastic with no moving joints to allow your ankle to bend naturally. If you skate for long periods of time on these it can cause pain in your calfs. Though if your not accustomed to rollerblades you almost certainly will get soreness in your ankles & calfs. So as far as the actual boot goes, I prefer the flexability for more control.

    Wheels however are a different story, the price doesnt really matter too much on these...or the bearings. If you are going to be skating on rouch surfaces like asphalt you will want a very dense wheel so that they dont just crumble right away. The density is located on the sides of the wheel 88a being densest and 72a being the softest. Each one has its own benefits. Softer wheels will provide a smoother feeling where you wont feel tripped up by small twigs or rocks...or cracks in the sidewalks. They will also allow more maneuverability and sharp turning. Hard wheels will allow for more speed because a dense wheel will roll faster with less surface resistance. Speed skaters will generally lean towards the upper 80 range, but someone who say plays hockey will go for the softer ranged wheels, because of the added level of control they provide. Bearings are rated by an ABEC rating Abec3-6-9 etc the higher the number the the more precise and resistant to wear the bearings are. I believe it can go up to like Abec12 or 16 but I forget...I use Abec6's because theyre cheaper.

    Downside though is wheels can generally run you like $40 for a whole set so you will want to rotate your wheels when they start to wear, and you HAVE to keep your bearings clean or youll lose that smooth rolling feeling, and replace it with workin your ass off to not roll very far at all lol. Another thing I have noticed is new wheel sets really mess up your balance, even after rotating it changes the way the skate feels and how easy it is to maneuver. So if at first it feels a lil akward and stiff like you cant control much, wait a lil while skating on them, they will wear down to fit your individual skating style.

    Wheel diameter is a mystery to me but I do stick to 80mm just because I can burn thru a set of wheels in about 2-3 weeks if I skate for long periods of time. Lastly the brakes on a rollerblade can sometimes be somewhat akward, personally I just remove the damn things cus they caused me more pain and grief than good. Just learned other ways to brake instead. Anyway hope that helps ya shop. icon_smile.gif
  • Sk8Tex

    Posts: 738

    May 16, 2010 5:51 AM GMT
    Almost forgot, I stopped using dense wheels (even though they save money) because they slip on the pavement/asphalt if you try to turn to quickly to say... dodge a person, dog, car, street sign.... lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 16, 2010 10:04 AM GMT
    solomons - they are the best!!! i used 2 have a pair.
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    May 16, 2010 1:12 PM GMT
    Went to see my cousin's son in a race at university a couple of years ago. He was wearing a brand called Bont.
    Retired my Luigino's 3 years ago and switched to Bont. Have never looked back. My Bont 3 Vaypor's are the most comfortable and absolutely the fastest skates I have ever owned.
    On average I will keep a pair of skates for 2 years. I change the wheels out every season in between.
    If speed and maneuverability are what you are looking for, then this is the only skate worth buying! Once you try them nothing else bloody compares!
    Cheers,
    Keith
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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 16, 2010 1:32 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidWell, Keith. Share with the class how much you spent on these.

    Pricey? Did you have to pimp an immediate family relative in order to afford yourself a pair?


    Cost? What difference does that make? icon_eek.gif They are a worth while investment. Cost shouldn't matter when it comes to quality, comfort, and performance. In this world, you get what you pay for.
    Once you try them, you will feel the same way. icon_wink.gif
    Cheers,
    Keith
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    May 16, 2010 3:23 PM GMT
    I used to have a pair of roller skates similar to these when I lived in the West End in downtown Vancouver.

    rollerskates.jpg

    Mine were made of a very soft brown suede and the wheels were much larger - kryptonics. They were heavy suckers and I used to do the seawall and back most days before work. Weekends were too crowded. The heavy foot lifting and distance (6 mile loop, 12 if you turn around and go the length the other way) kept me in very good shape and pumped up my 'ass'ets, lol.

    -Doug
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    May 17, 2010 7:43 AM GMT
    In my experience, the higher priced blades buys you a better (and safer) equipment.

    The first pair I ever had weren't super expensive. They were about mid price from Sports Authority. They were okay.
    It wasn't until I bought my K2's for close to $200 that I noticed a difference. Better maneuverability. Better speed. Better comfort. Better brake.

    I'm glad you asked this question becuase I've been wanting to invest in a new pair again.