Today is HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 18, 2010 6:35 PM GMT

    Today I'm celebrating the people working to end this curse through a vaccine.


    I am a participant in the WISH Study at UIC, here in Chicago. I get my 3rd vaccine shot next Tuesday.

    I encourage you all to get involved. The bigger our fight the better chance of winning.


    http://www.hopetakesaction.org/


    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/HIV-Vaccine-Trials-Network/55636956839

    In the Huffington Post today:
    Ending AIDS: Grounds for Despair, Cynicism or Hope?
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mitchell-warren/ending-aids-grounds-for-d_b_578777.html


    Be well guys!
  • JayDT

    Posts: 390

    May 18, 2010 7:11 PM GMT
    Yeah I saw this in another post. It's interesting and I haven't dcided if it's for me yet. But I definitely think it's a step in the right direction. Good for you for being a participant. I'd love to hear more of your story and how you feel like this has impacted you personally. Any side effects?
  • titus8229

    Posts: 84

    May 18, 2010 9:33 PM GMT
    Props to you onstagebuffnaked for what you're doing. This clinical trial is a great cause and it's awesome that you're participating. The development of an HIV vaccine has been a great challenge over the years because of the "sloppy" replication that HIV is famous for. If you could take a look at the phylogeny, there would probably be hundreds of distinct HIV viruses!

    Despite the great cause, I can't exactly say I have high hopes for this trial; if anything it will help researchers understand the virus a little more. I think the future of HIV prevention lies in gene therapies. HIV's main path of entry into our T-cells is through the CCR5 receptor. In Africa, where HIV is very prevalent, researchers have noticed that because of selection, newborn children within the given population have an extremely diminished CCR5 receptor counts, making them "almost immune" to the HIV virus. Since the CCR5 receptor has no essential roles for life, a gene therapy could be developed to suppress the expression of the receptor making it very difficult for people to contract the virus. Such a therapy would even be passed down to offspring. Now this method isn't full proof since there are other receptors HIV can use to enter the cell (CXCR4)... but its a good start :-)

    Wow... I probably could have started a whole new thread with that, but good luck and let us know how it turns out!

    -Jeff
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 19, 2010 1:40 AM GMT
    That's fantastic! Thank you so much for participating.icon_biggrin.gif

    -robby
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 19, 2010 1:43 AM GMT
    I do my best to try and help the LGBT Community.
    I volunteer for outreach and prevention here in Chicago.


    It takes trial and error to get results and gain knowledge in life. I look at partaking in this study as the least I can do to help our community and the world fight this disease. It has been fun and informative for me. I thought at first I did not want to do it because it is a 'trial' but these things are regulated and for the most part, safe. I'd rather researches learn something from me at a cost, then having HIV affect millions of lives in the future. I'm willing to take that risk.


    Lets hope for the best!