THE ATKINS DIET

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    May 27, 2007 10:35 AM GMT
    I Have lost a lot of weight using the atkins diet has any one else tried it?
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    May 27, 2007 12:26 PM GMT
    I was never as low-carb as the Atkins induction phase, and I never achieved ketosis. But, cutting out most of the carbs is how I lost 30 pounds. I went from a largely vegetarian, heavily agrarian diet loaded with whole grains and beans to a primarily meat and veggie diet. I continued eating carrots and apples, but I cut out potatoes and sweetpotatoes for about a year and a half (until muscle gain kicked up my caloric need).
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    May 27, 2007 12:47 PM GMT
    I have known people who when on this severe diet and lost weight while not engaging in a life style of exercise. But I heard it is very difficult to stick to this diet as it is very severe. Not a nutritionist here, but I am not sure how healthy this severe diet is simply because of the high saturated fat and triglyceride level.... I would not think this is all that great for your cardiovascular system...
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    May 27, 2007 6:42 PM GMT
    I know alot of people who did atkins and then ballooned when they started eating carbs again. The name of the game is caloric restriction. if you eat less calories than you burn you lose weight. Atkins works well because carbs tend to be high in calories. a slice of white bread has 100 calories, yes just one slice. Lean meat tends to have fewer calories per serving think chicken. I eat 8 oz of purdue chicken tenderloins and it is 200 calories, 1 cup of rice has at least that much. when people put carbs back in their diet they tend not to be able to do the portion control correctly and then gain everything back. the best diet is to eat a little bit of everything in moderation. your dinner plate should be half vegetables a quarter meat and a quarter grain.

    Also atkins is considered very unhealthy and has lead to health issue in a lot of people because of the excessive protein consumption from meat
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    May 27, 2007 7:40 PM GMT
    The reason people tend to have an easy time sticking to a low-carb diet is that protein and fats sate the appetite, so there are fewer food cravings to contend with. Carbs don't sate the appetite very well, and they can be very addictive. I'm hypoglycemic and very sensitive to carbs in terms of blood sugar swings, and I was a sugar junkie. At my fattest, a few times a week, I'd inhale an entire package of Newman O's in one sitting. That's well over 2000 calories worth of cookies as an afternoon snack.

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    May 27, 2007 10:05 PM GMT
    Not true about decreased caloric intake as far as Atkin's diet goes...

    You can eat greasy burgers with baccone as long as you decrease the carb intake.

    The calories stays high.

    The theory comes from decreased intake of carbs to control insulin spike in the body, forcing the body to resort to fat and protien for metabolism of energy instead of carbohydrates, thus inducing the state of keytosis.

    Caloric intake is not a consideration when it comes to the Atkin Diet.

    People who gain back a lot of weight after such diet may also be prone to type II DM as well due to the frequent uncontrolled insulin spikes... Insulin is an anaboilic protien hormone but it stores excess food energy both as glycogen and fat indiscriminately.
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    May 28, 2007 4:23 PM GMT
    I heard recently that Atkins is the best diet you can be on. Unfortunately the majority of people who go on Atkins don't get the books, etc. which teach you how to follow the plan properly.
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    May 28, 2007 4:28 PM GMT
    I would not say its the "best."

    It is inherently unhealthy.

    But it seems to be quite effective when one is COMPLIANT with the strict instructions.

    But it is also not that easy to stick to because of the strict restrictions.

    And once you get off the diet, the outcome maybe worse than before you started...
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    May 28, 2007 6:05 PM GMT
    From what I've read online, it's only the two week phase one of Atkins that is super restrictive. Carbs do get reintroduced back into the diet, albeit, not the same kinds or in the same amounts that made one overweight in the first place. Once the desired weight is achieved, a maintenance diet is used to stay that way. It would be pretty stupid for someone on any weight loss diet to go back to the old diet after losing all the weight.

    And, I don't think an Atkins maintenance diet is necessarily inherently unhealthy. Sure, if one got all his daily calories from a diet of meat and cheese, it wouldn't be very healthy. But, a diet full of veggies with meat for protein and very few sugary or starchy foods is not inherently unhealthy.

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    May 28, 2007 6:25 PM GMT
    I did not read the information from the Atkins Diet institution myself, but this was a discussion with some co-workers who went through the diet, and one of the co-workers who was in the discussion is a certified nutritionist working in our hospital.

    She said that the Atkins actually restrict some intake of fruits and certain vegetables due to the carbohydrate content (everything has carbs...) AND it does not promote watching your saturated fat and trans fat intake. AND THIS IS THE BIIGEST STICKER for this diet...

    She said a less severe version of the Atkins is bascially the South Beach Diet, where it promotes intake of some fruits and vegetables.

    So unless, this nutrionist was wrong, and that Atkins Diet does promote intake of frutis and vegetables AND restrict intake of saturated and trans fats, then it would not be inherently unhealthy...

    But what I have heard is not the case...
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    May 28, 2007 6:35 PM GMT
    Just looked at the Atkins site..

    It is a possibility that the Diet, while sticking to the theory of avoding insulin spkie, has gone thorough numerous modifications since the death of Dr. Atkins (I think he had a cardiocascular condition) and the consequent critisism of the diet due to it's original stance on triglycerate, saturated fat, trans fat, and exercises...

    So what the Atkins Diet today may not be the exact Atkins Diet we came to know when it first made fame...
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    May 28, 2007 6:50 PM GMT
    YES its modified.. because sucralose was not even available until 1999... and this diet recommends it.

    Sucralose is basically a form of chlorinated sugar (chlorocarbon sugar) that we humans cannot break down and digest.. That is why for some people, this causes some gas as the micorbs in our gut can break it down and thus thrive on it as a food source.. And because it is a chlorocarbon, although not easily broken down because of the strong covalent bonds, can be absored into our body to be excreated by the kidneys... so long term health concerns are not studied as of yet..
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    May 28, 2007 7:01 PM GMT
    The best diet you can go on is the one that you lose weight on be it atkins or some sort of other diet. That said most people end up failing on the diets they go on -- for any diet to work it takes discipline -- and often end up yo-yoing with their weigh which is probably worse than ever having just stayed heavy. Also I think you are better off making permanent lifestyle changes that include both diet and exercise, and have the losing weight and becoming healthy as long term not short term goals.
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    May 28, 2007 7:40 PM GMT
    I think the advice to favor unsaturated fat in the diet will ultimately be regarded as being as misguided and dangerous as the old, now discredited idea that margarine is healthier than butter. Unsaturated fat is nowhere near as chemically stable as saturated fat and is far more prone to peroxidation by free radicals than saturated fat; polyunsaturated oil is a huge oxidative load on the body, and modern diets contain far more of it than just the necessary small amounts of Omega 3 and 6 essential fatty acids.

    Our mothers breastfed us saturated fat. Our bodies store fat as saturated fat. Saturated fat gets blamed for our ills, yet over the past 100 years, consumption of traditional saturated fats is way down while at the same time, consumption of polyunsaturated seed oils is way way up. The overload of all that inflammatory Omega 6 laden seed oil is why people are now scrambling to get enough Omega 3. Inflammation is implicated in both cancer and heart disease. Additionally, these chemically fragile polyunsaturated oils are being subjected to high temperatures during manufacture and cooking, which causes unhealthy oxidation and polymerization.

    Personally, I'm more inclined to favor the traditional fats that our species evolved on rather than the fats found in relatively new agrarian diets based on seed crop monocultures. For more on that perspective, see:

    http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/
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    May 28, 2007 7:56 PM GMT
    Re: chlorinated sugar

    Yeah, Atkins is big on some of the processed artificial crap found in modern diets. Atkins is fine with dietary garbage as long as it's low in carbs. I was shocked to read the labels on Atkins brand products; lots of processed artificial stuff.
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    May 28, 2007 8:16 PM GMT
    As I said, I am not a nutritionist, this was told to me by a nutrionist..

    But I do know something about chemistry (was going to be a physical chemistry majory) and I do know somethig about biochemistry...

    What you stated have many foundamental flaws...

    Fisrt of all...

    " The greater the degree of unsaturation in a fatty acid (ie, the more double bonds in the fatty acid), the more vulnerable it is to lipid peroxidation (rancidity)." According to Wikipedia.

    So what you just stated is indeed a false statement. You have to look at WHERE the covalent bonds are and how all this reacts within your body chemically is HIGHLY DEPENDENT on the target site, thus different at different tissues. Saturated fats has been proven to cause atherosclerosis specifically within the vascular walls, not other target tissues...

    2nd, A growing child is NOT the same as a mature person. You cannot compare what our mothers feed us when we are infants to what we eat now as adults... You need a lot more fat as a growing child for proper neural development for the neural sheath to properly be myelinated. Furthermore, the body and endocrine fucntions and fat metabolism of a developing child is NOT the same as an adult. As a matter of fact, all of us went through a short phase of pituatary diabetus during the height of growth hormone spike and our body's insulin receptor and uptakes were all at one time NOT the same as an adult.. SO THE COMPARISON with adult intake of saturated fat CANNOT be DIRECTLY compared to a child, its not the same...

    I still do not think you can claim saturated fats are better or the same to our bodies without detailed understanding of biochemistry...

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    May 28, 2007 8:29 PM GMT
    Oh one more flaw..

    The statment about how our bodies stores saturated fat is really not based on understanding of how our body MANUFACTURES fat inthe first place...

    All food particles are broken down before being stored in the body. Fat is manufacturefd and stored with insulin. Fat does not have to come from fat... It is not that simple like if you eat animal skin then your body makes more skin cells... How this fat is sotred has to do with how it is to be broken down into engery when needed, so if it is indeed saturated has nothing to do with the reason you provided...
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    May 28, 2007 8:37 PM GMT
    And although I do not have it right here and remember this in bio and physiology and pharmacology classes, there are studies that have proven and provide detailed step by step biochemical pathway how saturated fat increases LDL levels... So I really think it is very problematic to claim that saturated fats are good for an adult diet without understanding the proven science behind it.

    I do not know the hisotry of the introduction of partially hydrogenize fats and trans fats into our diets OR THEY HAVE DONE ENOUGH good sound studies on this matter until recently.

    But that does not "Unproven" the harms of saturated fats in an adult diet...
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    May 28, 2007 8:44 PM GMT
    So what you just stated is indeed a false statement.

    How so? Your wikipedia quote agrees with what I wrote.

    Saturated fats has been proven to cause atherosclerosis specifically within the vascular walls, not other target tissues...

    A 1994 study appearing in the Lancet showed that almost three quarters of the fat in artery clogs is unsaturated. The "artery clogging" fats are not animal fats but vegetable oils
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    May 28, 2007 8:53 PM GMT
    No it stated the exact opposite..
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    May 28, 2007 8:57 PM GMT
    Just read that...

    Just because what is found in the clog is unsaturated does NOT mean that unsaturated is better...

    Again, you are assuming that because what is found LOCALLY in the tissue means that specific substance is a bad thing for INTAKE...

    That is not how the body works...

    Saturated fats causes LDL rise that causes the deposition of unsaturated fats.

    NOT unsaturated fats intake will find its way to the vascular systems as if it is a direct path...

    There is no coherence with that thinking..
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    May 28, 2007 9:04 PM GMT
    I would ahve to read it closely, but this article is certinaly not a STUDY.. It is her own theories with collected referrences selected to support her theory.

    A theory has to be tested in a study to be proven, and all of its proposed step by step processes validated...

    This article did not provide any experiments or sugeest waht she said in a clear and precise biocheical pathway...
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    May 28, 2007 9:45 PM GMT
    No it stated the exact opposite..

    I wrote: "Unsaturated fat is nowhere near as chemically stable as saturated fat and is far more prone to peroxidation by free radicals than saturated fat"

    Perhaps my sentence structure was a bit awkward, but basically, I said unsaturated fat is more prone to peroxidation. Your Wikipedia quote uses different language to state the same thing: "The greater the degree of unsaturation in a fatty acid (ie, the more double bonds in the fatty acid), the more vulnerable it is to lipid
    peroxidation (rancidity)."

    The greater the degree of unsaturation, the more prone it is to peroxidation. That means monounsaturated fat is more prone to peroxidation than saturated fat but less prone to peroxidation than polyunsaturated fat.
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    May 28, 2007 10:40 PM GMT
    Atkins was in his 60's when he died! Think about it.

    You can lose weight eating only jelly beans!

    It is high in saturated fat and low in complex carbs.

    We need fruits, vegetable, high fibre, protien and good fats for optimum health.
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    May 28, 2007 11:08 PM GMT
    There is good evidence that of a cardioprotective nature of both olive oil, one of the oldest sources of fat it the world, and canola, or rapeseed oil. The Lyon Diet Heart Study is a good one where they looked at a "mediterranean" style diet with the fat coming primarily from oilive, rapseed or nut oils and not from animal sources, and the results are fairly impressive. I have also heard some argue that in a mediterranean diet that the oils from nuts may be a bigger benefit than either the olive or canola oil, but again that is not something proven -- though there is good evidence on their own, particularly walnuts, that they should be a regular part of our diets.
    Most of the fats we eat anyway would not have been in the hunter gatherer diet -- which probably would have been low in fat. They would have gotten fats from the animals they killed which would have been lean, and from nuts and seeds, but the sources would have been irregular and seasonal. Most of the fat we eat today are those that arose from the domestication of both animals and plants.