Quick or Slow: Questions on lifting technique

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 25, 2010 9:23 PM GMT
    I'm curious whether the way weights are lifted affects outcome, effectiveness, or safety? What differences, if any, are there in doing quick reps versus slower reps? Do specific goals determine how one should lift?
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    May 25, 2010 11:54 PM GMT
    I can only speak for the sport-specific weight work we used to do with the Ski Team: bulk is something skiers try to avoid, and power (explosive power) is needed, so we did all weight exercises with "pop" - fast.

    Others will know a lot more than I do, but there is

    - strength work: moving large amounts of resistance a limited number of times,
    - endurance work: moving resistance a large number of times
    - power work: medium weight, lower reps (10-15), explosive movements

    Hope that helps, but as said, others will know a lot more than I do.

    Nat




    Nat Brown taught and coached cross-country running and skiing for 16 years before joining the US Biathlon Team as wax technician. In 1989 he switched to the US Cross-Country team. He was the first American to take over technical services for a foreign team (Slovenia) and worked also for Germany and Sweden. He has coached at 3 Olympics and 14 World Championships, edited Nordic Update for 9 years and Cross-Country Skier for 2. He has written three books on skiing and training; the latest was The Complete Guide to Cross-Country Ski Preparation (Mountaineers Books) which has gone through two editions and a Russian translation. He spends as much time as he can at his ranch in British Columbia where he most recently hosted a pre-Olympic training camp for Slovenia.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    May 26, 2010 12:53 AM GMT
    From what I remember, there was a study that basically said neither actually builds more muscle than the other. What's more important is the number of reps and the weight of the weights as opposed to who fast you can do them.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    May 26, 2010 1:31 AM GMT
    From what I've read, the slow reps are more effective at fatiguing muscle, and thereby stimulating it to grow. With fast reps, the tendancy is to throw the weight or use the "bounce" which really isn't making the muscle work.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 26, 2010 1:35 AM GMT
    mix it up! make your own. Form before speed though.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 26, 2010 1:43 AM GMT
    Progress saidmix it up! make your own. Form before speed though.


    What he said. Make your work out your own and you'll get the best results. I just lift so that my muscles feel the pressure. It worked great for me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 26, 2010 1:50 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidFrom what I've read, the slow reps are more effective at fatiguing muscle, and thereby stimulating it to grow. With fast reps, the tendancy is to throw the weight or use the "bounce" which really isn't making the muscle work.


    Try telling Olympic lifters (i.e., Clean & Jerk and Snatch) they are not working their muscles. icon_wink.gif
    Train fast and the neuromuscular system adapts via quicker muscular contractions.
    Train slow and the muscles become stronger/bulker, but also slower.
    It really comes down to what your goals are. Are you training for performance, bulk, toning? etc.

    snatch.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 26, 2010 3:39 AM GMT
    I'm wanting to incease my size by a bit in my arms and chest, but not training for a specific sport, just general fitness and to look better.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 26, 2010 6:13 AM GMT
    controlled.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    May 26, 2010 5:40 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidcontrolled.


    This. Do both, but under control.

    Oh, and Hook 'em Horns!
  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    May 26, 2010 5:59 PM GMT
    I have been doing victor costas workouts (you can find him on youtube if you want to check it out). I really like them and have really seen some good improvements (i have no photos of this).

    I have been doing much lighter weight at a much slower and concentrated movement, focusing on one muscle at a time. I have been getting better results, it is easier to have more control on the movements, less cheating and use of other muscles, and it is less stressful on my joints and organs, He really shows how important it is to focus the mind in order to get a good workout. Over the long term, I do think it is healthier to do it this way.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 27, 2010 3:13 AM GMT
    Generally, I like to use good form and lift and lower the weight slowly. But to get past the point of muscular failure and squeeze out an extra rep or two or to break through a plateau and lift a heavier weight, I sometime use a looser form and lift faster.
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    May 27, 2010 11:50 AM GMT
    Explosive lift (never sacrificing form), controlled return.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 27, 2010 3:43 PM GMT
    UFJocknerd saidExplosive lift (never sacrificing form), controlled return.


    Or in other words "explosive controlled lift, slower controlled return" If you sacrifice form you have lost control icon_rolleyes.gif

    Throwing weights around doesn´t do anything apart from dent the floor.
  • Thegenuineart...

    Posts: 127

    May 27, 2010 3:50 PM GMT
    slow gradual movements help stimulate the most muscle fibers, quick movements are more for explosive, or "on demand" power, or sometimes for endurence.

    check www.bodybuilding.com BEST WEBSITE EVER to help you answer your questions
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    May 27, 2010 4:49 PM GMT
    Quick/Explosive (with control) mostly for Performance/Sport.
    Slow mostly for brute strength and "show".
  • nicelyproport...

    Posts: 573

    May 28, 2010 3:43 AM GMT
    Different workout regimens achieve different results. If you're trying to determine the best approach for yourself, why not take advantage of the smorgasbord of bodies displayed here on RJ? Contact those members whose physiques you admire most and ask each what approach he uses.