How did you start out?

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    May 26, 2010 8:52 AM GMT
    Last night I went to my friends apartment to wash a load of clothes and upon walking in my jaw dropped She had the whole apartment pretty much furnished and full washer, dryer, bath room + accessories and Bedroom set...

    Now needless to say I might have be a bit jealous seeing as though I come from more humble digs but that's not the case. She about 5 years my senior and been in the Air Force about 10 years. Were the same grade (rank) however I'm a "fast burner"

    I wondered do ppl starting out on there own (no family support whatsoever) have the less that boastful living situations or do we all have to "Come Up"...


    **forgive the grammatical errors was sleepless at 4am..
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    May 26, 2010 11:26 AM GMT
    It depends on the person.
    I'm almost 40, and am just now starting to get on my feet in the past couple years.
    One of my friends is 26, an attorney, and has a beautiful condo in downtown Manhattan with a balcony overlooking the Hudson.
    There's not a one-size-fits-all answer.
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    May 26, 2010 11:47 AM GMT
    I've always supported myself for the last 11 years, and it can be hard not having the cushioning to allow you to save (by living with folks) and work and study etc.

    But the single best thing you can do is 100% planning. Yep, it is boring, tedious and will highlight restrictions you need to make, but you will benefit greatly.

    Budget with an aim to put away as pure savings anywhere form 10-30% of your net income. Make sure you have enough cash each week to enjoy yourself, otherwise you will just be tempted to blow out your savings too often.

    Stick to a budget around your pay cycle, learn to live without your savigns and to go without for the unncessary things (big TVs, latest cars etc).

    Have financial goals. Mine is now all about buying an apartment, so I am putting 30-35% away every fortnight, leaving enough to cover my bills, and plenty of cash to pay for everything else as well as a night out each week if I choose to. I will also add to that fund my annual bonus and any extras like tax refunds when I can.

    Being financially secure first is a very empowering thing- aim to save one year of your net salary, it might take a few years but is achieveable.

    Once you are secure, you can start looking at setting yourself up better as your job gets better, you get more pay, and you mature.

    Along the way, if you want to set up home, hit the classifieds, the markets, the garage sales, all that kind of thing. You will find that MANY very wealthy people started out doing this and continue to do so for life.

    Most importantly though, don't get hung up on what other people have, just make some goals, a plan to achieve them, and be excited about each progress you make in achieving those goals.

    Most people who think they cannot have what they want in life simply are not prepared, they do not plan and do not strive for what they want.

    You obviously work damn hard (judging by the hot bodicon_smile.gif ) so keep at it and think only postively, but patiently.
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    May 26, 2010 11:51 AM GMT
    ALthough I have an amazing family, we aren't rich. I've put myself threw college, bought my own car as a teenager, and pay all my own living expenses, and I have since I was 18.

    With that being said, yes, there is a period of time when you need to get your footings in, then you can start to enjoy life and begin to have nice things. My loft here in Philly, is AMAZING! Although it is a far stretch from my first rented apartment 5 years ago. My boyfriend and I work really hard to make a modern, fun, comfortable living environment! All my friends love to come over and play!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 26, 2010 11:56 AM GMT
    It absolutely depends on your priorities and how you spend your money.
    Look at someone's lawn.. same thing. Some people have beautiful lawns, others not at all. Its all about effort, ones priorities and how much you want to put in.

    Your friend may have planned carefully for some time. Also she may be in debt
    up to her eyeballs... or maybe not, she may have saved her money for years so she'd have a reasonable place.

    I love it when someone checks out my home and says, "my god, this is a starter home"??? LOL. But a nice home and lawn is a priority for me. I saved my money for years before I had my house built and my goal: 1/2 my mortgage needs to be paid when I close on my new home. I made it, but it was challenging.
    Both goals of new furniture for my living room and the completion (of construction) of my family room was delayed for a year after I moved in.
  • josephmovie

    Posts: 533

    May 26, 2010 12:01 PM GMT
    From my experience anyone who is really established and under about 25 has parents bankrolling praticaly the whole thing. Don't be fooled by the surface.
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    May 26, 2010 2:32 PM GMT
    It looks like most of the time looks can be deceiving... thanks for the inputs!

    I remember one time in Austin a friend and I were having an evening out with a few of his friends. There not much older than we were, but they all seemed to have the dream live and of nice clothes and nice cars (Audi, Infinitys, BMW) while me and Gustavo were driving a Escort and myself a Civic and still shopping at Express. icon_razz.gif

    We definitely thought that one day like these guy our ship will eventually come in... Too bad you just can marry up to money like some girls can lol.. Just messing icon_razz.gif

    You can't really know one's story unless you live with them...
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    May 26, 2010 3:18 PM GMT
    Dude.. I started out with a bed, and my laptop. That was ALL I had. No pots.. no pans.. no where to sit.. nothing. I've been through a lot of furniture that was donated to me (old prop furniture from local acting troops/ rejects from friends who moved and consolidated their stuff/ shit I found on the side of the road) lol

    Thankfully I've worked really hard and gotten.. mostly.. all stuff of my own now. And my place is really established. Just takes time and effort. icon_cool.gif
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    May 26, 2010 3:23 PM GMT
    I "started out" by being made to join the Army when my parents found out I was gay. I was discharged from the Army in Denver when I was 20 (not for being gay, mind you). From there, I quickly moved in with a guy that I knew wasn't right for me so I'd have a roof over my head.

    Then, I recieved a job offer out in New Jersey, which I took because it paid incredibly well. Shortly after moving out here, the contract was pulled from the company I was working for and I was unemployed after a month. I paid up the hotel I was staying in for the next couple of weeks and went into the city to go out and drink away my worries.

    I fell asleep on the subway and woke up with a knife to my throat and tow big guys demanding my wallet (which had every last penny I had). Penniless, IDless, and soon homeless, I turned a couple of tricks (seriously!) to get me through. But then my backpack with all my clothes got stolen while I was sleeping on the subway and I had ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.

    I refused to call my parents for help. I got into a youth shelter called Safe Space where a case worker helped me to get a new ID and SS Card. My computer savvy and networking ability got me a call for a menial job that had me working a ton of overtime and I met someone in a bar with a cheap room to stay in.

    Things were rocky for another couple of years, but I got in with a good company and started to build myself life in NYC. When I was 24, I met my partner that I'm still with today. We just bought our first house a few months ago.

    It can take a long time, and it can be really hard, but in the end your drive and your resoursefulness will make up for your lack of financial resources. Just keep plugging away.
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    May 26, 2010 3:28 PM GMT
    Ricovelas saidThere not much older than we were, but they all seemed to have the dream live and of nice clothes and nice cars (Audi, Infinitys, BMW)


    Dude, if that's what you value in life, your priorities are all wrong. Speaking of superficial and destructive.

    In my opinion, people who live like that should be shot, not emulated.
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    May 26, 2010 3:43 PM GMT
    jmnyc1177 saidI "started out" by being made to join the Army when my parents found out I was gay. I was discharged from the Army in Denver when I was 20 (not for being gay, mind you). From there, I quickly moved in with a guy that I knew wasn't right for me so I'd have a roof over my head.

    Then, I recieved a job offer out in New Jersey, which I took because it paid incredibly well. Shortly after moving out here, the contract was pulled from the company I was working for and I was unemployed after a month. I paid up the hotel I was staying in for the next couple of weeks and went into the city to go out and drink away my worries.

    I fell asleep on the subway and woke up with a knife to my throat and tow big guys demanding my wallet (which had every last penny I had). Penniless, IDless, and soon homeless, I turned a couple of tricks (seriously!) to get me through. But then my backpack with all my clothes got stolen while I was sleeping on the subway and I had ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.

    I refused to call my parents for help. I got into a youth shelter called Safe Space where a case worker helped me to get a new ID and SS Card. My computer savvy and networking ability got me a call for a menial job that had me working a ton of overtime and I met someone in a bar with a cheap room to stay in.

    Things were rocky for another couple of years, but I got in with a good company and started to build myself life in NYC. When I was 24, I met my partner that I'm still with today. We just bought our first house a few months ago.

    It can take a long time, and it can be really hard, but in the end your drive and your resoursefulness will make up for your lack of financial resources. Just keep plugging away.


    Yep. We've all had our paths, some, easier than others.
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    May 26, 2010 4:37 PM GMT
    One thing you need to realize is your friend may be in debt up to her ass.
    One of the first guys I dated seemed to have it all going on; nice place, car, and stuff. Come to find out he charged it all and when he couldn’t pay for it he filed bankruptcy. He was able to keep almost everything: car, bedroom set, washer/dryer, living room set, entrainment center, even the $1,500 tread-mill. The only thing that got repo’ed was his Kitchen set.
    For me, like most I went all in, over my head. When I lost my job I freaked out because I couldn’t pay my bill and joined the Navy; too stupid to realize I wouldn’t be making any money.
    After a couple failed attempts at living on my own during my Navy carrier. I finally wised up and lived on board and saved all my money so that when I got out I had a head start.
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    May 26, 2010 7:02 PM GMT
    viveutvivas said
    Ricovelas saidThere not much older than we were, but they all seemed to have the dream live and of nice clothes and nice cars (Audi, Infinitys, BMW)


    Dude, if that's what you value in life, your priorities are all wrong. Speaking of superficial and destructive.

    In my opinion, people who live like that should be shot, not emulated.


    I assure you that I believe things are nice, I would definelty love to have company over my home and them feel comfortable and welcome than have a grand expensive car with shitty mileage.

    My parents have 1 nice car bt the rest are "hoop d's". And expect for Sunday foe church they drive the beaters every day.

    My belief is use what u have but when u can upgarde to bigger and better things. I don't think that's too wrong.
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    May 26, 2010 7:28 PM GMT
    I understand the jealousy, Ricovelas. I remember being that way when I was starting out and seeing friends who seemed to have their lives settled, traveling, house full of cool stuff. Now I'm there, and have friends twice your age who aren't anywhere near that. Everybody's different.

    I think it's cool that you're looking forward to being in that place. You will be - work toward your goals, be smart, be responsible, and it'll happen.

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    May 26, 2010 7:34 PM GMT
    Age 21, after college. All I had was a dome-shaped papasan chair with an orange cushion, and a 13" black and white TV. 1985 icon_wink.gif
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    May 26, 2010 7:50 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidAge 21, after college. All I had was a dome-shaped papasan chair with an orange cushion, and a 13" black and white TV. 1985 icon_wink.gif

    It sounds all too familar. Except for the papasan chair -- even a new grad has to have some boundaries.
    Unless the parents are footing the bill nobody's first post-college apartment is going to be all that much.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 26, 2010 8:33 PM GMT
    "What's in YOUR wallet ?"
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    May 26, 2010 8:37 PM GMT
    my first place had everything too washer, dryer even a gas cooking range with a few electric plates. a queen bed with a nice tv that i never watched lol xept this one time when i heard about MJ's death. oh and I lived on my own!

    I loved my life on my own, cant wait to move out again in 2 months! icon_smile.gif
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    May 26, 2010 8:46 PM GMT

    I'm starting out here in Boston with roommates and looking to continue having a room to myself. I am beginning work with a local non-profit and will look to do some traveling in the future. the needs to save money for such things is necessary and it takes the maturity to not buy this or that as often as you may have previously and think of where you'd like to see your money - somewhat - come back to you; inverse instant gratification.
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    May 27, 2010 3:24 AM GMT
    I should take in a roomie or go roomie with that said mentioned friend. She knows so it's not a problem there....

    Roomies come with problems though, and there's only 1 Baño.... so I dunno.....icon_confused.gif
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    May 27, 2010 4:44 AM GMT
    I'm a teacher in one of the lowest paying states in the country, so my lifestyle has never been great. Nevertheless, I started out well. I was in a really tiny town that had been searching desperately for someone who could teach science and math. I was able to rent a tiny house for not much money. It wasn't a great house, but it was enough for me.

    My surroundings have never been important. If you visited my current home you'd see I still have the same used furniture I started with. No milk crates, but some of it is quite dated. It's all well cared for, though. This is an old house and it's not one of the nice ones. It's one of the really early homes that missed getting replaced. A lot of the lighting is bare bulbs with pull chains!

    Over time, the cardboard boxes for end tables (with a table cloth over them) have been replaced so that most of my furniture is real. I still use TV trays for a computer desk and a bed stand. I had the money budgeted a few years ago to replace them, but chose to buy 2 bookshelves and a netbook instead. I get a lot more joy out of these items than the other option. Priorities.

    I want comfort and I want things to last. Aesthetics are quite a bit lower on my list. I pay cash for everything and I grew up in a home with not a lot of money, so I'm used to this. My parents got rid of the used furniture they bought in the 1960's after their marriage when I was 14 (in 1989). They are still using the "new" furniture.

    Seriously, if you can't pay cash for it, you're better off without it.