Moving to another country

  • Moishendlishu...

    Posts: 435

    May 27, 2010 3:08 AM GMT
    So here is the situation. I want to move to Toronto. I have visited Vancouver and Victoria multiple times, and have also been to Montreal. I hear Toronto is a beautiful city, very culturally diverse, and it just seems like a fun place to live. My problem is I'm an American citizen, so I will either have to attend a university, get a work visa and prove I have a skill set they can't hire a Canadian for, or find myself a husband.

    I'm all for trying to find myself a Canadian guy, but the other two options are more difficult. Does anyone on here live in Toronto, or has anyone who is an American citizen moved to another country? If so, any tips on how to get started? I know this won't be an overnight thing but I'd like to start the process. Any tips?......

    Or any hot canadian guys that wanna chat? :p
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    May 27, 2010 3:20 AM GMT
    Can't stand Arizona's...heat?

    Good luck to you. icon_wink.gif
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    May 27, 2010 3:24 AM GMT
    Haha Canada is like a muted version of America. Everything you guys do we do to less of an extreme.
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    May 27, 2010 4:23 AM GMT
    oh boy....here we go with them silly canadians icon_lol.gif
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    May 27, 2010 4:25 AM GMT
    TrollMonger saidHaha Canada is like a muted version of America. Everything you guys do we do to less of an extreme.



    ok hommie...wuts going on over here.
    last time i remember u had yo jizz pic on ur profile....and now it's gone?
    bitch that pic was the best one of the bunch....u should put it back up
    for realz....lolz
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    May 27, 2010 7:34 AM GMT
    I lived in the City of TORONTO and went to school in London Ontario.

    Nice it maybe....cold...cold...cold and so...no...no...no!!

    Hawaii is far better!
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    May 27, 2010 10:21 AM GMT
    Living in one of the best Islands in the world, and one of the worlds most livable citys. To give all that up for such a cold county like Canada, they could not pay me enough. But good luck on your endeavor.
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    May 27, 2010 1:42 PM GMT
    I agree... go to a country where you may have to learn the language. You will be bettering yourself in the end.

    You'll have to tag all your sentences with 'eh' if you move to canada...

    I know that if the opportunity and stars aligned, I would move to Chile in a heartbeat!

    Just sayin.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    May 27, 2010 2:14 PM GMT
    You may be chasing a rainbow: visits don't tell what it's like really to live in another city or country. I've spent 3-4 months a year in Canada for the last 40 years, and while I love Canada, the time I've spent there has taken some of the illusions away that we can get when we're not really "connected".

    If I can offer advice: got to Toronto and spend a month or more there. See how you really like it when you face the day-to-day stuff. And even then, some things like taxes, building permits, the mail... won't be completely clear.

    Don't get me wrong: i do love Canada (in fact, I'm moving up for the summer in about 2 hours, as soon as the car is loaded) - but ANY radical move needs perhaps more one-the-ground research.

    Good luck!
  • Nayro

    Posts: 1825

    May 27, 2010 2:18 PM GMT
    back2nyc saidwhy in the world would an American want to go to Canada??? Like what's really the big difference?? I know Canadians may argue here that they are more "european" but then I don't think any Europeans have been to Canada and felt it was "european" from any angle. As far as I know Canada is just an extension of the US - all their trade and economy are mostly dependant on USA... and they should have border free controls like in the EU.

    If u really want to move somewhere then why not try a country totally different - where at least you will have some new experience... and maybe learn about a different culture. So many nice countries... you can try Argentina.. or anywhere in Europe...or maybe Asia.


    It is funny that you should say that.

    I'm a european. And guess where I lived for half a year ;) yepz, In canada!

    I agree that the USA and Canada have a lot of similarties. Though I think Canada does tend to be a bit more European than the USA (at least where ive been in the USA)
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    May 27, 2010 2:50 PM GMT
    I moved to Mexico. I was lucky in that the american company that I was working with sent me here so I didnt have to worry about Visa etc... as it was all done for me. If I wanted to stay in Mexico I doubt it owuld be overly hard because few Mexicans have my qualifications as an american lawyer. Having advanced degrees really helps with this.
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    May 27, 2010 3:54 PM GMT
    Consider moving to Portugal or Spain :p

    Russia is an interesting place to live. What I love about Russia is how cheap food is. I loved being able to live off $10 a week on groceries. However, other goods are definitely not so cheap even for the average American. Russian people are also very real and honest with you.

    Unfortunately Russia is not a place to be gay...
  • KissTheSky

    Posts: 1981

    May 27, 2010 4:05 PM GMT
    I love Toronto. If it were easier to move there, I would -- or maybe Vancouver.
    Canadians are really progressive, so gay people are not treated like second-class citizens. The cities are clean and the people are friendly.
    Plus there were tons of hot men everywhere. icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 27, 2010 4:13 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidConsider moving to Portugal or Spain :p

    Russia is an interesting place to live. What I love about Russia is how cheap food is. I loved being able to live off $10 a week on groceries. However, other goods are definitely not so cheap even for the average American. Russian people are also very real and honest with you.

    Unfortunately Russia is not a place to be gay...



    Moving to Russia? Dude where's your head at?

    It's starting to piss me off that the US and Canadian media (and governments, and people) pretend that Russia is some kind of normal country that can be regarded and treated as any other country. It's not.

    Read and shiver http://larussophobe.wordpress.com/
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    May 27, 2010 4:20 PM GMT
    Tazo995 said
    pocketnico saidConsider moving to Portugal or Spain :p

    Russia is an interesting place to live. What I love about Russia is how cheap food is. I loved being able to live off $10 a week on groceries. However, other goods are definitely not so cheap even for the average American. Russian people are also very real and honest with you.

    Unfortunately Russia is not a place to be gay...



    Moving to Russia? Dude where's your head at?

    It's starting to piss me off that the US and Canadian media (and governments, and people) pretend that Russia is some kind of normal country that can be regarded and treated as any other country. It's not.

    Read and shiver http://larussophobe.wordpress.com/


    Good and bad things happen everywhere. I really don't think Russia is as different as many people assume it is. I mean, at least it's not Afghanistan or North Korea, right?

    I really had no problem living in Russia even as a foreigner. Perhaps I would think differently had I been born and raised there, especially since I was born in 1985 and would've had to spend my childhood during the hectic post-communist years.

    It's one thing how the Russian government works compared to the US and Western Europe, but people really are not that different in most places you visit. They have different languages and cultures, but they tend to have the same goals and worries as everyone else.

    Russia certainly has a long way to go to change things, and it's not going to happen over night. It's going to take the next couple of generations for Russia to dramatically change. As long as there are people who are alive and can remember the existence of the USSR, that mentality is going to continue to exist. So really, you kinda need the current generations to fade away before any "real" change will happen. Although I've often heard that some people fear the post-Soviet generations more than anyone born during Soviet times lol.

    Besides, what is "normal" anyway? icon_rolleyes.gif
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    May 27, 2010 4:25 PM GMT
    Umm... why are people giving the OP moving advice in the terms of telling him where to move to instead and basing it off things like he has to learn a new language (as if all people in Canada speak only English is another point). The dude has decided to go to Canada; there's nothing wrong with that and that's his decision. So let's help answer his specific questions instead of redirecting the conversation to where we'd me to.

    I think skilled worker's program is the strongest chance you'd get. What is it that you do for a living here?
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    May 27, 2010 4:30 PM GMT
    I have to give Canada credit that they just don't take any foreign immigrant like the US often does icon_rolleyes.gif It's actually really hard to immigrate to Canada, even if you're American. But yes, it definitely would be best to do the things that will increase your chances of getting permitted, unless you happen to luck out on a Canadian husband in the near future!
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    May 27, 2010 4:48 PM GMT
    Vancouver is lovely, spent the past 9 months there for school. A bit... slow moving but nice.

    I live in Toronto, it's definitely an interesting city, if a bit... dull looking?

    Montreal is where my heart is I think. It's a great city, the people are nice if you speak french, the gay culture there is widespread, and you get the chance to learn another language.
  • JayDT

    Posts: 390

    May 27, 2010 4:54 PM GMT
    I don't know about moving to Canada, but I do know about moving to and living in other countries. It is possible to apply for and get a work visa for just about any country. It's not too difficult but it does require work and diligence on your part. Contact the consulate or embassy for that country that is closest to you and begin researching the forms that you need to complete in order to get citizenship. It won't be fast, but once you get citizenship or at least a work visa you can start looking for work and move.
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    May 27, 2010 4:59 PM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Tazo995 said
    pocketnico saidConsider moving to Portugal or Spain :p

    Russia is an interesting place to live. What I love about Russia is how cheap food is. I loved being able to live off $10 a week on groceries. However, other goods are definitely not so cheap even for the average American. Russian people are also very real and honest with you.

    Unfortunately Russia is not a place to be gay...



    Moving to Russia? Dude where's your head at?

    It's starting to piss me off that the US and Canadian media (and governments, and people) pretend that Russia is some kind of normal country that can be regarded and treated as any other country. It's not.

    Read and shiver http://larussophobe.wordpress.com/


    Good and bad things happen everywhere. I really don't think Russia is as different as many people assume it is. I mean, at least it's not Afghanistan or North Korea, right?

    I really had no problem living in Russia even as a foreigner. Perhaps I would think differently had I been born and raised there, especially since I was born in 1985 and would've had to spend my childhood during the hectic post-communist years.

    It's one thing how the Russian government works compared to the US and Western Europe, but people really are not that different in most places you visit. They have different languages and cultures, but they tend to have the same goals and worries as everyone else.

    Russia certainly has a long way to go to change things, and it's not going to happen over night. It's going to take the next couple of generations for Russia to dramatically change. As long as there are people who are alive and can remember the existence of the USSR, that mentality is going to continue to exist. So really, you kinda need the current generations to die off before any "real" change will happen.

    Besides, what is "normal" anyway? icon_rolleyes.gif


    Fair enough that "normal" is a very arbitrary term.

    However, I'm not sure when exactly you were in Russia, but that change you're talking about is certainly not going to happen as long as the Russian government is doing what it's doing. With an ex KGB agent as the defacto leader you can be sure the methods don't change.

    As a foreigner I'm sure you were shielded off from the worst of the Russian regime, the worst you had to do was probably pay a couple bucks to the militsia every now and then.

    I lived in Georgia for a few years, I've been through the war, saw some very unpleasant things, and been held at gunpoint by a bunch of malnourished drunk russian conscripts (they're only like 5'7" tall but fuck i crapped my pants).

    In the Ukraine, Estonia, Armenia and Azerbaijan I ran into some more Russians, and none of the dealings were very pleasant (the worst was having a knife pulled on me on a Tallinn trolley bus). So I just don't like them very much in general.

    About 4 months after the war a friend of mine visited me in Tbilisi, meeting up with his girlfriend who was a Russian from Moscow. She thought Georgia was a nation fo 50 million people and a huge army icon_eek.gif ... it actually has 4 million people. And she was an intelligent, educated, person. The Russian government is good at lies, damn lies, and evil lies. And the West is sugar coating the whole thing on a regular basis.

    After all, we don't wanna give the Russians another reason to cut off the gas supply to Europe again next winter.

    I vote let's nuke 'em icon_razz.gif
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    May 27, 2010 5:04 PM GMT
    The poster of this thread isn't going anywhere near the former USSR, so you can settle down and breathe now. Although Canada has quite a few Ukrainian and Russian people ;)

    Good luck on getting to Canada! I hope it works out. Change can be a good thing especially when you start over in a new place.
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    May 27, 2010 5:17 PM GMT
    Given the choice of Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver I'd take Vancouver first, then Montreal and Toronto dead last.
    It really is a rather boring city and the surroundings are much duller than the other two especially as compared to Vancouver. There's more to do in Vancouver year round, the weather is milder, seldom snows and it is a world away from being even close to Toronto which is somewhat an uptight place, Vancouver is very very laid back. There's no comparison.
    To make a similar US comparison of Toronto to Vancouver you would have to use NYC compared to San Fran. Two different worlds.
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    May 27, 2010 5:52 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidThe poster of this thread isn't going anywhere near the former USSR, so you can settle down and breathe now. Although Canada has quite a few Ukrainian and Russian people ;)

    Good luck on getting to Canada! I hope it works out. Change can be a good thing especially when you start over in a new place.


    Haha yea that's right, I actually know a couple of them. Over here it's all good, cause we made it out of the hellholes and got to Vancouver, baby!
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    May 27, 2010 8:38 PM GMT
    I'm Mexican, and the next month June 27, I’m going to move to Toronto in a SWAP program that gives me the opportunity to be working there for a year.

    I'm really scared somehow because of the language differences, even when I’ve got a high score in my TOEIC (English) test. I know that I have lot to improve whit my English(that’s why I usually don’t post here), and it's going to be my first time living ALONE, FAR from HOME, and i don't have any relatives or anyone there, so it's going to be a huge challenge for me, even when i know that i have the support of the embassy of Canada, and the SWAP program service, and I’m going there whit other 4 strangers that I’m going to meet a day after we go to Canada in Mexico City.

    I will have to learn to speak and write fluid English, know the place (never been there), and begging a whole new life there.

    If your are from the STATES (a great advantage because culturally, in language and more both countries are really similar), and you REALLY know WHY you wanna move there, and you’ve READ about the place, well i thing you should make it, and feel confident about yourself, it's going to be a big step, but come on you're going to learn a lot about it.

    The only advice that I can give you it’s to READ a lot, especially in the official website of the country, study hard, and be organized o.O
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    May 27, 2010 8:41 PM GMT
    I spent the last three years of my life in Vancouver trying to attain citizenship or even a work permit... I failed for a number of reasons but got to know the system through and through.

    I was there completing my Masters and it is extremely difficult to immigrate, contrary to what most Americans think. The easiest way to move, in my opinion is via a student visa and then once you're there, explore work permits and permanent residency card options. It is much easier to qualify for the latter two options if you're already living there. If you have any specific questions, shoot me an email.