ANYBODY HEAR OF "MONAVIE"?

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 28, 2010 4:13 PM GMT
    I have a client who has been after me to sample a supplement called "MonaVie" for some time. Looks to have an energy supplement as well as some nutritional stuff. Thoughts?
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    May 28, 2010 5:30 PM GMT
    I was a MonaVie distributor for a while. All it is is another one of those Acai juices that you see everywhere in network marketing. No matter what they say, one thing I learned is that even though most of the companies do bottle their own, all Acai juices produced in North America are all made by the same company and are the same product. You would be better off buying it at the Vitamin Shoppe or health food store as it is a lot less expensive.

    I deleted the rest of my post as I realized I was actually promoting my own products and that is not why I am here.

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    May 28, 2010 6:32 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidI have a client who has been after me to sample a supplement called "MonaVie" for some time. Looks to have an energy supplement as well as some nutritional stuff. Thoughts?


    Over-priced, over-hyped, network marketed, magic fruit juice. Acai is a berry. Berries have antioxidants. BFD. I bought a container of freeze-dried acai, and the only thing it does is make protein shakes taste like crap. My advice: eat fresh real food... berries, colored veggies, greens.
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    May 28, 2010 6:43 PM GMT
    paradox said
    HndsmKansan saidI have a client who has been after me to sample a supplement called "MonaVie" for some time. Looks to have an energy supplement as well as some nutritional stuff. Thoughts?


    Over-priced, over-hyped, network marketed, magic fruit juice. Acai is a berry. Berries have antioxidants. BFD. I bought a container of freeze-dried acai, and the only thing it does is make protein shakes taste like crap. My advice: eat fresh real food... berries, colored veggies, greens.


    That is why I stopped being a distributor for them. If you eat right, you do not need it. Why pay $140/month for a product that you could buy in the health food store for $16 and lasts for 2 months?
  • inuman

    Posts: 733

    May 28, 2010 6:51 PM GMT
    Exerpt taken from the following web page.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A%C3%A7a%C3%AD_Palm


    "As a dietary supplement

    Recently, the açaí berry has been marketed as a dietary supplement. Companies sell açaí berry products in the form of tablets, juice, smoothies, yogurt, instant drink powders, and whole fruit.

    Marketers of these products make unfounded claims that açaí and its antioxidant qualities provide a variety of health benefits, none of which has scientific confirmation to date. Quackwatch noted that "açaí juice has only middling levels of antioxidants—less than that of Concord grape, blueberry, and black cherry juices, but more than cranberry, orange, and apple juices."

    Furthermore, the extent to which polyphenols as dietary antioxidants may promote health is doubtful. No credible evidence indicates any antioxidant role for polyphenols in vivo,[6][7] but rather in minute concentrations, they may affect cell-to-cell signaling, receptor sensitivity, inflammatory enzyme activity or gene regulation.[7][8] Specifically, there is no scientific evidence that açaí consumption affects body weight or could promote weight loss.[9]

    According to the Washington, D.C. based Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) thousands of consumers have had trouble stopping recurrent charges on their credit cards when they cancel free trials of açai-based products.[10][11] Even some web sites purporting to warn about açai-related scams are themselves perpetrating scams.[9] Apparently false claims include reversal of diabetes and other chronic illnesses, as well as expanding size of the penis and increasing men's sexual virility and sexual attractiveness to women.[12]

    As of March 2009, there are no scientifically controlled studies backing up any of these claims. According to ABC News correspondent Susan Donaldson, these products have not been evaluated (in the United States) by the FDA, and their efficacy is questionable.[13] In late 2008, lawyers for The Oprah Winfrey Show began investigating alleged statements from supplement manufacturers who suggested that frequent Oprah guest Dr. Mehmet Oz had recommended their product or açai in general for weight loss."



    I've seen way to many people buy into this around this area of Ontario and its sad because no one bothers to do any research at all. I've always eaten blueberries and those are better for you then this stuff. icon_smile.gif
  • JayDT

    Posts: 390

    May 28, 2010 10:26 PM GMT
    I tried it. The juice tasted ok. I don't think it was worth the price and honestly I didn't see any changes to my health of anything like that. "Oh but you have to drink it for a long time when you're 90 you'll thank mona vie..." Yeah how bout I just drink more water and take a vitamin instead.
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    May 28, 2010 10:30 PM GMT
    I learned in a a nutrition class that all fruit juices, especially clear ones, are nutritionally crap. You're better off making a smoothy from the raw fruit including as much of the peel/rind as you can stomach, since those contain up to 3000 times more antioxidants than the flesh. The phytonutrients also oxidize within 15 minutes, so consume promptly.

    The juice itself, after all of the processing, transportation, storage, and opening, contains less than .01% of the phytonutrients than the raw food. What's worse is you get a blood sugar spike from the juice, even if it doesn't contain any added sweeteners, and this fundamentally alters your metabolism in ways that obstruct weight loss and proper energy maintenance.
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    May 28, 2010 10:32 PM GMT
    Oh yeah, and all plants should be eaten in conjunction with other plants (fruits and vegetables) to maximize the nutritional benefits of their phytonutrients.