What companies would you invest in?

  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Jun 02, 2010 9:29 PM GMT
    If you could invest in any company, what companies would you invest in?

    seems like some of the best ones are often times privately owned:


    Trader Joes http://www.traderjoes.com/

    In-N-Out Burger http://www.in-n-out.com/


  • Midas426

    Posts: 965

    Jun 02, 2010 9:56 PM GMT
    I know I wish I had put some money in Dollar Tree (DLTR) a few years back when the price was in the mid-30's. Had I done that I could have double my money in two years time. icon_sad.gif

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    Jun 02, 2010 10:14 PM GMT
    My own companies. I'm currently saving to drop a bundle into them for advertisement, then quit my job once the profits triple my current salary. Only problem is it's a 5 year plan because I save very slowly.
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    Jun 03, 2010 1:39 AM GMT

    You are correct. The best one's are privately owned and non-US. icon_exclaim.gif I'm currently split about 87% private and 13% public.

    The wonders such things have to offer.
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Nov 23, 2012 6:16 PM GMT
    50 Unfortunate Truths About Investing


    1. Saying "I'll be greedy when others are fearful" is much easier than actually doing it.

    2. The gulf between a great company and a great investment can be extraordinary.

    3. Markets go through at least one big pullback every year, and one massive one every decade. Get used to it. It's just what they do.

    4. There is virtually no accountability in the financial pundit arena. People who have been wrong about everything for years still draw crowds.

    5. As Erik Falkenstein says: "In expert tennis, 80% of the points are won, while in amateur tennis, 80% are lost. The same is true for wrestling, chess, and investing: Beginners should focus on avoiding mistakes, experts on making great moves."

    6. There are tens of thousands of professional money managers. Statistically, a handful of them have been successful by pure chance. Which ones? I don't know, but I bet a few are famous.

    7. On that note, some investors who we call "legendary" have barely, if at all, beaten an index fund over their careers. On Wall Street, big wealth isn't indicative of big returns.

    8. During recessions, elections, and Federal Reserve policy meetings, people become unshakably certain about things they know nothing about.

    9. The more comfortable an investment feels, the more likely you are to be slaughtered.

    10. Time-saving tip: Instead of trading penny stocks, just light your money on fire. Same for leveraged ETFs.

    11. Not a single person in the world knows what the market will do in the short run. End of story.

    12. The analyst who talks about his mistakes is the guy you want to listen to. Avoid the guy who doesn't -- his are much bigger.

    13. You don't understand a big bank's balance sheet. The people running the place and their accountants don't, either.

    14. There will be seven to 10 recessions over the next 50 years. Don't act surprised when they come.

    15. Thirty years ago, there was one hour of market TV per day. Today there's upwards of 18 hours. What changed isn't the volume of news, but the volume of drivel.

    16. Warren Buffett's best returns were achieved when markets were much less competitive. It's doubtful anyone will ever match his 50-year record.

    17. Most of what is taught about investing in school is theoretical nonsense. There are very few rich professors.

    18. The more someone is on TV, the less likely his or her predictions are to come true. (U.C. Berkeley psychologist Phil Tetlock has data on this).

    19. Related: Trust no one who is on CNBC more than twice a week.

    20. The market doesn't care how much you paid for a stock. Or your house. Or what you think is a "fair" price.

    21. The majority of market news is not only useless, but also harmful to your financial health.

    22. Professional investors have better information and faster computers than you do. You will never beat them short-term trading. Don't even try.

    23. How much experience a money manager has doesn't tell you much. You can underperform the market for an entire career. And many have.

    24. The decline of trading costs is one of the worst things to happen to investors, as it made frequent trading possible. High transaction costs used to cause people to think hard before they acted.

    25. Professional investing is one of the hardest careers to succeed at, but it has low barriers to entry and requires no credentials. That creates legions of "experts" who have no idea what they are doing. People forget this because it doesn't apply to many other fields.

    26. Most IPOs will burn you. People with more information than you have want to sell. Think about that.

    27. When someone mentions charts, moving averages, head-and-shoulders patterns, or resistance levels, walk away.

    28. The phrase "double-dip recession" was mentioned 10.8 million times in 2010 and 2011, according to Google. It never came. There were virtually no mentions of "financial collapse" in 2006 and 2007. It did come.

    29. The real interest rate on 20-year Treasuries is negative, and investors are plowing money into them. Fear can be a much stronger force than arithmetic.

    30. The book Where Are the Customers' Yachts? was written in 1940, and most still haven't figured out that financial advisors don't have their best interest at heart.

    31. The low-cost index fund is one of the most useful financial inventions in history. Boring but beautiful.

    32. The best investors in the world have more of an edge in psychology than in finance.

    33. What markets do day to day is overwhelmingly driven by random chance. Ascribing explanations to short-term moves is like trying to explain lottery numbers.

    34. For most, finding ways to save more money is more important than finding great investments.

    35. If you have credit card debt and are thinking about investing in anything, stop. You will never beat 30% annual interest.

    36. A large portion of share buybacks are just offsetting shares issued to management as compensation. Managers still tout the buybacks as "returning money to shareholders."

    37. The odds that at least one well-known company is insolvent and hiding behind fraudulent accounting are high.

    38. Twenty years from now the S&P 500 (INDEX: ^GSPC ) will look nothing like it does today. Companies die and new ones emerge.

    39. Twelve years ago General Motors (NYSE: GM ) was on top of the world and Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL ) was laughed at. A similar shift will occur over the next decade, but no one knows to what companies.

    40. Most would be better off if they stopped obsessing about Congress, the Federal Reserve, and the president and focused on their own financial mismanagement.

    41. For many, a house is a large liability masquerading as a safe asset.

    42. The president has much less influence over the economy than people think.

    43. However much money you think you'll need for retirement, double it. Now you're closer to reality.

    44. The next recession is never like the last one.

    45. Remember what Buffett says about progress: "First come the innovators, then come the imitators, then come the idiots."

    46. And what Mark Twain says about truth: "A lie can travel halfway around the world while truth is putting on its shoes."

    47. And what Marty Whitman says about information: "Rarely do more than three or four variables really count. Everything else is noise."

    48. The bigger a merger is, the higher the odds it will be a flop. CEOs love empire-building by overpaying for companies.

    49. Investments that offer little upside and big downside outnumber those with the opposite characteristics at least 10-to-1.

    50. The most boring companies -- toothpaste, food, bolts -- can make some of the best long-term investments. The most innovative, some of the worst.

    http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2012/11/14/50-unfortunate-truths-about-investing.aspx
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Dec 13, 2012 9:30 PM GMT
    How to position yourself for the coming recession

    the forecast for recession at 100%
    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/us-chance-of-recession-is-100-2012-12-12?link=MW_story_popular
  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Dec 13, 2012 9:31 PM GMT
    Whole Foods, Trader Joes, Netflix, Carmax, Apple, HHGreg, Walmart.
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    Dec 13, 2012 9:35 PM GMT
    nti
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 13, 2012 9:55 PM GMT
    FACEBOOK

    JKicon_lol.gif
  • madridtop

    Posts: 5

    Dec 13, 2012 10:18 PM GMT
    Citi
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2012 10:22 PM GMT
    Welp I just played the Stock Market Game and did terrible.

    Don't invest in Apple.

    Southwest Airlines was my best investment.
  • madridtop

    Posts: 5

    Dec 13, 2012 10:26 PM GMT
    Apple did not go well this weeks but I think it has to rebounce. The problem is that people are so used to see Apple's super out-of-the-box launches, that they are always expecting to go wow every 6 months.

    The company's data is stunning and the secret weapons they have, should end up giving the stock a boost in the months to come...
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    Dec 13, 2012 10:28 PM GMT
    madridtop saidApple did not go well this weeks but I think it has to rebounce. The problem is that people are so used to see Apple's super out-of-the-box launches, that they are always expecting to go wow every 6 months.

    The company's data is stunning and the secret weapons they have, should end up giving the stock a boost in the months to come...


    Well Apple made me lose my fake money. So I am not ever investing real money.
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    Dec 14, 2012 1:23 AM GMT
    Look at the Fortune 500 companies traded in the New York Stock Exchange. These companies usually perform very well.

    By the way, what does this have to do with "Dating & Relationships"? Oh wait...never mind! icon_confused.gif
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    Dec 14, 2012 10:49 PM GMT
    msuNtx said
    madridtop saidApple did not go well this weeks but I think it has to rebounce. The problem is that people are so used to see Apple's super out-of-the-box launches, that they are always expecting to go wow every 6 months.


    Well Apple made me lose my fake money. So I am not ever investing real money.
    NOT a smart move - You're young and could amass a hefty retirement savings if you started now with real money. Just invest - (in 401k's, IRA's and taxable accounts) and don't speculate - and in a diversified portfolio of investments - just don't put most of your money in a single investment, 'cause like Apple, any single investment might get crushed. With national debt the way it is, there is bound to be severe inflation at some time in the future - investments allow savings to grow beyond inflation. Anyway, someone as hot as you could influence other 21 y.o. RJrs to follow suit - not good for them either.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 14, 2012 11:09 PM GMT
    Try the ETFs "VTI" for domestic stocks and "EEM" for international stocks.
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Dec 26, 2012 7:03 PM GMT
    Morgan Stanley Wealth Management launches LGBT initiative

    http://www.lgbtqnation.com/2012/12/morgan-stanley-wealth-management-launches-lgbt-initiative/
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    Dec 26, 2012 7:27 PM GMT
    i would highly recommend a wealth manager or a company which offers similar services (most banks do dependent on your financial status). They interview you, get a sense of what your investment requirements are and then create a portfolio with high to low risk investment options and manage it for you "buying and selling". Its a great way to invest as the overhead on you personally is alot less as someone else is actively managing it for you. I use PSG (south african group) who gave my mother 23 percent return last year, my dad 27% and i got 21 which isnt bad (its a family thing, sister is joining this year).

    I am thinking of using HSBC next year as im moving to Singapore (no capital gains tax, whoot whoot double whoot). anyone have any experience with them?

    ps: as for companies. Im a firm believer in what Warren Buffett does, long term investing vs speculation. Find a company, check out the management (important) and market (less important than management) and yea, invest long term. Again, companies like PSG helps you with that.
  • jock_1

    Posts: 1492

    Dec 26, 2012 7:39 PM GMT
    stocks you think are going to explode. I have made a 20% return on my investment the last 3 years on a great local company which is in the health market,,,, soon to release on the market a cancer detection kit for colon cancer. it will increase 5x when the FDA approves it or if the company sells the rights to a larger medical company it should increase 3 times...fingers crossed. also heavy invested in a starter company slowing the effects of brain cancer. bought at $2 bucks a share and is expected to hit $25 in a couple years.
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Jan 25, 2013 9:47 PM GMT
    2013 and Beyond: Investing After the Great Recession



    http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/01/23/2013-and-beyond-investing-after-the-great-recessio.aspx
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    Jan 25, 2013 10:00 PM GMT
    Investing in Ford during the auto bailout era. It was the only clear no brainer I've ever seen in the stock market.

    These days no idea.
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    Jan 25, 2013 10:12 PM GMT
    ZAGG, way undervalued at the moment. I have my own 401k's and Roth IRA for safe bets. I sold like 40k of AAPL back when it was 400 and then it goes to 700 =/... but looks like it's heading back to 400 again maybe soon. Cheap!
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    Jan 25, 2013 10:51 PM GMT
    Whole Foods Mkt is doing pretty well.

    and

    It might be too late for Netflix

    or


    Sony is doing pretty well and Motorola solutions since there are rumors that Google is going to team up with them and make xphone*
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    Jan 25, 2013 11:04 PM GMT
    Metta840. Most would be better off if they stopped obsessing about Congress, the Federal Reserve, and the president and focused on their own financial mismanagement.


    Holy shitfuck yes this.
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    Jan 25, 2013 11:05 PM GMT
    ATC84 saidInvesting in Ford during the auto bailout era. It was the only clear no brainer I've ever seen in the stock market.

    These days no idea.


    When the food prices skyrocket, I'll check out fast food.