Text Speak a.k.a. Abbreviations

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2010 2:37 AM GMT
    How r u?
    Gud, urself?
    What R U ^ 2?

    How do you feel about people typing to you like that? I use proper grammar on text messages and I find it much more... appealing if someone properly types so I can understand it without deciphering code.


    Better yet. What if someone who is physically attractive and seems like he would be a good match ended up typing LyKe DiS? Turn on, off?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2010 4:12 AM GMT
    I agree. I don't care for text speak. Please use complete words and sentences!
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    Jun 03, 2010 10:24 AM GMT
    I have the old style multi-tap keypad thingy. It takes forever to type correctly, so I use txt speak as a time saver.
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    Jun 03, 2010 12:55 PM GMT
    A lot of people using text speak assume that the recipient understands what they mean. Many abbreviations are self-evident, but I have received messages that I couldn't make head or tail of. People should not assume that everybody is a texter.
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    Jun 03, 2010 1:13 PM GMT
    viveutvivas saidA lot of people using text speak assume that the recipient understands what they mean. Many abbreviations are self-evident, but I have received messages that I couldn't make head or tail of. People should not assume that everybody is a texter.

    Agreed. I'm not against abbreviations per se, especially when texting on a cell phone. I used prescribed abbreviations constantly in the US Army (tng = training, trk = truck, cdr = commander, mtg = meeting, hrs = hours, etc).

    But I can't figure some out, either, especially when they incorporate symbols. They become like a rebus puzzle game, at which I was never very good. Maybe someone needs to create a texting dictionary or phrasebook.
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    Jun 03, 2010 3:49 PM GMT
    I use it frequently 'cos I'm broke all the time so I try to fit as much information into one message as much as possible, I hate wasting two texts when I've only gone over the text message limit by one or two words. And the emoticons are good to inflect emotion into your sentence. Though if I've got free text I always use proper grammar.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 03, 2010 3:57 PM GMT
    some abbreviations are OK, they save space time and money.

    The ones incorporating symbols are retarted and actually take more time to type than the actual word. Maybe people think it's cool or so?

    I think "u", "ppl", "idk" are perfectly acceptable.

    For some reason I have something against "wut" for "what". Not sure why, but it just pisses me off.

    And some people just use txt speak to hide the fact they really can't spell.
  • mtneerman

    Posts: 476

    Jun 03, 2010 4:39 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI have the old style multi-tap keypad thingy. It takes forever to type correctly, so I use txt speak as a time saver.


    i have the same thing, but if something is worth the time to text, then it's worth the time to make sure it's understood. i even punctuate my texts.
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    Jun 03, 2010 4:59 PM GMT
    Agreed I only use the letters "u" and "r" and the numbers "2" and "4" to shorten the texts if I am running out of room - other than that I type it all out. icon_smile.gif
  • lifeat84

    Posts: 54

    Jun 03, 2010 5:28 PM GMT
    viveutvivas saidA lot of people using text speak assume that the recipient understands what they mean. Many abbreviations are self-evident, but I have received messages that I couldn't make head or tail of. People should not assume that everybody is a texter.


    I agree, people sending text messages should be aware of their recipients language abilities. How many people randomly text people they don't know well or brand new associates? In such infrequent instances a standardized form of language should be the operating language until a level of understanding is achieved, then go ahead and bastardize whatever dialect you're using all you wish. I mean seriously ppl, wtf r u thinkin, tryin to txt in Ebonics or Southern or German when your new friend only speaks New England English or Dutch? You wouldn't do that, so why attempt the shorthand? Sure it might be habit, but everyone in this country, as long as they passed grade school, knows how to talk in a mostly intelligent dialect that can be understood by the majority of the rest of the nation, use your brain people, (whatever higher power of creation or evolution you believe in put it there and its there for a reason beyond Celebrity gossip, Sports statistics, and useless trivia)
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    Jun 03, 2010 5:34 PM GMT
    I'm all for economizing when you're sending a text message on a phone. I can pretty much understand anything.

    But please, an email, a chat session, a forum post...it doesn't cost you anything to write out the whole word.
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    Jun 03, 2010 6:21 PM GMT
    Text Speak is for text messages only. Otherwise it's very annoying.
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    Jun 05, 2010 4:26 PM GMT
    if ucn rdths ucnba sec & gta gd jb!
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    Jun 05, 2010 10:06 PM GMT
    mtneerman said
    paulflexes saidI have the old style multi-tap keypad thingy. It takes forever to type correctly, so I use txt speak as a time saver.


    i have the same thing, but if something is worth the time to text, then it's worth the time to make sure it's understood. i even punctuate my texts.
    I always punctuate...hard to read without doing that.
    But, I think of txt speak as a form of shorthand. There's nothing wrong with it if it gets the idea across. Aside from that, the corporation I work for txt's lik ths all the tim cuz were n a hury alot.
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    Jun 05, 2010 10:09 PM GMT
    zotamorf62 saidif ucn rdths ucnba sec & gta gd jb!

    Gawd help me, I read that as easily as normal text... icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 07, 2010 10:13 AM GMT
    I cant stand text messages without proper Grammar. I hate abbreviated text messages.
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    Jun 07, 2010 10:46 AM GMT
    OMG ppl, v r n 2010

    Texting is for fast, short messages. If we're concerned about grammar and punctuation and spelling we could go back to snail mail.

    One of the great things about the English language is it is such a bastard language. We borrow words shamelessly from other languages, we adapt words, we incorporate slang, we coin new words. It is a living language that continues to evolve - not many of us could understand English as Chaucer spoke it. It is part of the reason English has become the dominant global second language and is rapidly becoming a global language. Text speak is only another morph of a living language
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    Jun 07, 2010 11:27 AM GMT
    It's a worldwide phenomenon. You should see the Japanese version of text speak... That's a whole other language for yet a whole other language!
  • Daniepwils

    Posts: 151

    Jun 07, 2010 4:04 PM GMT
    I don't use it specifically so that I don't start using it in my correspondence at work, more importantly with my clients.