OK just wondering if this food is good or bad for me!

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    May 28, 2007 6:02 PM GMT
    Ok I'm a guy that LOVES sushi(its the only kind of fish I eat! yes think dirty on that one thats what you're suppose to do lol) No I used to it like crazy, 3 times a week...but I've been good and cut it down to like two times a month. I was just wondering is sushi actually good or bad for you? Someone at the place I go said it was good for you since its fish and stuff like that, but everyone else says its bad...

    ok this may be a weird topic but I'm just wondering? If anyone else has a food they are unsure about please talk about it here...but answer this question first! lol
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    May 28, 2007 6:41 PM GMT
    Why do you think it's bad for you? It's full of protein and is virtually fat free.
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    May 28, 2007 7:05 PM GMT
    I don't know, just some of my friends say it is. And its the one food I eat until I can't eat no more! I know thats bad and I have to work on that part. Its my favorite food and I'm paying so :P lol
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    May 28, 2007 8:09 PM GMT
    I think it depends on the fish. Tuna does concentrate mercury in its flesh, but some species of tuna are worse than others in that regard. In terms of canned tuna, the chunk light Tongol tuna has a fraction the mercury as solid white albacore tuna. Unfortunately, I don't know what types of tuna are used in sushi.

    My understanding is that the salmon used in sushi is farm-raised, not wild. IMO, that makes it somewhat less desirable.

    There's also the slight chance of being infected with a live parasite if one were to eat raw fish that were not well inspected. In all my years of eating sushi, I have yet to get a single parasite.

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    May 28, 2007 11:49 PM GMT
    I have eatedn sushi 5 days a week before. As long as you are buyign it from a reputable store you should be fine. I would say tuna should be eaten in moderation it can concentrate murcury and the salmon is likely farm raised unless it specifies otherwise but in generally sushi is an extremely healthy food
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    May 29, 2007 1:16 AM GMT
    I eat sushi for lunch at least 3 days a week. The only thing that has every worried me is the high-salt content of the soy sauce (so I use the low-salt variety).

    Small portions, high protein, low-calorie, good flavor...seems almost perfect to me.


    Is there something else to be worried about?
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    May 29, 2007 2:14 AM GMT
    isnt the rice used in sushi rolls, white rice. Shouldn't that be an issue?
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    May 29, 2007 4:39 AM GMT
    Well yes, white rice may not be as good for you a brown, but how much rice are you actually eating when you eat sushi? A little white rice now and then is not the end of the world. As obscenewish said: small portions.
    Mercury can be an issue, but fairly low and low enough that they encourage pregnant women to eat fish for the DHA despite the mercury risk, so not a very high risk.
    Compared with a lot of the other food options there are out there -- particularly when you are on the good and need to grab something pre-made -- the sushi is a healthy way to go.
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    May 30, 2007 2:03 AM GMT
    How big of a roll do you like to swallow? LOL I'm sorry, I had to
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    May 30, 2007 12:01 PM GMT
    It seems to me like the packing and shipping of sushi-grade fish is advanced to the degree that one can get good sushi just about anywhere. The raw tuna and salmon I get in Iowa City is just as good as the raw tuna and salmon I've had in South Beach, NYC, or London.
  • Dolphin1

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    Jun 04, 2007 3:35 PM GMT
    It depends on what type of roll you are eating. Is it your simple spicy tuna roll or some tempora roll that has been deep fried and covered in rich sauces? I think that "sushi" is a very general term that can go from the very "healthy, low fat, high protein" range to the very "high fat, high calorie" range very quickly. The differences are obvious and it is about making the right choices. BTW, I also LOVE sushi and eat it at least once a week. :)
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    Jun 04, 2007 5:24 PM GMT
    I'm not sure why this still amazes me, but with all of the media blather that gets generated on food safety, nobody comes close to getting it right.

    The issue to be concerned about is bacterial contamination. This goes double for anything eaten raw, and is of extreme concern for any meat products eaten raw. Personally, I think that eating any meat product raw is just foolish.

    A couple of generations ago, bacterial food poisoning was the third-leading cause of death in the U.S., and it still ranks high in much of the world. Now we have a rigorous system of inspection and distribution of food that minimizes contamination, but it can never eliminate it entirely. The consumer still has to exercise a little responsibility and care.

    You cannot tell whether food is contaminated or not merely from its appearance, taste, or odor.

    BTW, raw fish should definitely be considered off-limits to anyone with a weakened immune system.

    For fish, the next most important concerns are toxins that accumulate in the tissues, but originate from other organisms that the fish eat. This is more common in reef fish and shellfish, but is always present to some extent. These toxins come from protozoa and algae, and they may not be entirely inactivated by cooking. For tropical fish, the most well-known of these toxins is ciguatera.

    The next concern is scombroid poisoning. This comes from histamines that are produced in fish tissues after they die. The rate at which these molecules accumulate is slowed by refrigeration, but they will always accumulate to some extent, until the fish is cooked. The symptoms are basically an allergic reaction. Fish of the tuna family are particularly likely to cause scombroid reactions if not handled carefully at all times.
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    Jun 04, 2007 5:33 PM GMT
    The basic point here is that sushi proper, not rolls (maki-zushi) are fine for you. Rice, fish, wasabi. Salmon, btw, is not considered a "proper" sushi fish in Japan, as it is anadromous; it travels from salt water to fresh water and vice-versa. The fresh water intrusion makes it a prime specie for parasites. Rolls, on the other hand, are potentially spiked with fattening things from cream cheese to mayonnaise as binders or even deep fried things (crunchy rolls...) There is a fat problem, if you are not careful! Be aware as well of anything involving teriyaki sauce: loads of sugar and corn syrup!!!
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    Jun 05, 2007 6:16 AM GMT
    Probably just being pedantic, but I worked in hospitality for many years and sushi is generally regarded as the roll-type food with rice and nori.

    Sashimi is the name for the slivers of raw fish accompanied by soy and wasabi.
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    Jun 05, 2007 8:14 PM GMT
    Correct, Sashimi is raw fish, but a slice of raw fish atop a piece of rice is Sushi proper
  • GeorgeNJ

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    Jun 08, 2007 1:49 AM GMT
    I want to back up what Mindgarden wrote above -- which is fairly thorough and well-written. The main concern I have is that living parasites can be hiding away in that raw fish, and that makes me nervous. Allegedly, dipping sashimi (or sushi) in soy sauce with wasabi blended in is supposed to kill any such organisms, but I don't know if that is just somebody's wishful thinking.

    The fish itself, of course, is great for us: the fats in certain kinds of fish are extremely healthy, and the protein is excellent. But between the possibility of parasites, etc.,and mercury and other pollutants, I prefer not to take my chances too often.

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    Jun 08, 2007 4:59 AM GMT
    I agree with the statement that eating any raw meat is risky. But that's not the same thing as "bad for you." As long as you do not get sushi with a lot of bacteria or parasites, then it won't be bad for you. But the more you eat, the higher the risk.

    The metals and other toxins that accumulate in some fish are definitely bad for you. Farm-raised fish reduces this exposure. But it's generally agreed that moderate consumption is safe. Eating lots every day may be exposing you to too much.
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    Jun 08, 2007 7:43 AM GMT
    Sushi in a roll = maki (translate = 'roll). This is usually made with fish and some condiment or with vegetables (daikon maki rocks the casbah!).

    Fish on a little thingee of rice = nigiri (translate = pressed). This is usually a single piece of fish on a pressed rice wedge. There are some that are not fish at all, like tamago, or egg.

    Just fish alone = sashimi. This is just pieces of fish, simple.

    Like many fishes, sushi is a good supply of omega oils, protein and other tasty stuff. We can't get enough of protein since it does assist in producing muscle mass, but because of the dangers of lead in tuna and the risk of infection, it's better to stick to reputable establishments and experimentation.