How Much Protein? Been Saying You Guys Are Protein Addicts...Read.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 04, 2010 4:41 PM GMT
    How much protein?

    Only one of the products tested by Consumer Reports, Six Star Muscle Professional Strength Whey Protein, specifies a maximum daily intake. Others use vague language that could encourage a high level of consumption. Consuming excess protein can also pose health problems, including diarrhea. Although protein is needed for bone development, excessive protein over the long term might also cause calcium to be excreted from the bones, increasing the risk of osteoporosis. And for diabetics or others with kidney problems, it can lead to further complications.

    The Consumer Reports investigation notes that consumers can roughly calculate how many grams of protein they need by multiplying their body weight by .4. For athletes, the general rule of thumb is about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day. The report provides several examples of better, cheaper ways to bulk up. Case in point: a sandwich with three ounces of chicken and an eight ounce glass of whole milk provides about 40 grams of protein, which is more than half the 72 grams needed by a 180-pound person and most of the 48 grams required by someone weighing 120 pounds.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jun 04, 2010 10:21 PM GMT
    Link please.
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    Jun 04, 2010 10:29 PM GMT
    Buffhunk64 saidHow much protein?

    Only one of the products tested by Consumer Reports, Six Star Muscle Professional Strength Whey Protein, specifies a maximum daily intake. Others use vague language that could encourage a high level of consumption. Consuming excess protein can also pose health problems, including diarrhea.

    Diarrhea although potentially embarrassing and inconvenient is hardly a health concern

    Although protein is needed for bone development, excessive protein over the long term might also cause calcium to be excreted from the bones, increasing the risk of osteoporosis.

    That was a lie, proposed by PETA to try and get people to stop drinking milk

    And for diabetics or others with kidney problems, it can lead to further complications.

    The Consumer Reports investigation notes that consumers can roughly calculate how many grams of protein they need by multiplying their body weight by .4. For athletes, the general rule of thumb is about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day. The report provides several examples of better, cheaper ways to bulk up. Case in point: a sandwich with three ounces of chicken and an eight ounce glass of whole milk provides about 40 grams of protein, which is more than half the 72 grams needed by a 180-pound person and most of the 48 grams required by someone weighing 120 pounds.
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    Jun 04, 2010 10:38 PM GMT
    u said 1 gram per pound of body weight for athletes.

    duh...that's what we've said all along...
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    Jun 04, 2010 10:42 PM GMT
    Oh and.... Supplement companies are out in defense of their products


    Optimum Nutrition
    http://www.optimumnutrition.com/news.php?article=874

    Cytosport
    http://www.cytosport.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/nsf_statement_consumer_reports_protein_drinks1.pdf

    EAS
    http://eas.com/safety?utm_source=hp
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    Jun 04, 2010 10:44 PM GMT
    tommysguns2000 saidu said 1 gram per pound of body weight for athletes.

    duh...that's what we've said all along...



    i thought the whole 1 gram/pound thing for athletes has been around for a while now.
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Jun 05, 2010 1:22 AM GMT
    Dietary Protein Intake Differences Based on Activity Levels
    "Many Americans -- athletes and nonathletes -- are meeting or exceeding their protein needs. Body builders' training programs typically include a maintenance phase, a muscle-mass building phase, and a tapering or cutting phase. Protein needs during these times vary. During the maintenance phase, recommended protein intake is 1.2 grams per kilogram body weight for maintenance of muscle mass. During the muscle-building phase, a protein intake of 1.4-1.8 grams per kilogram body weight is recommended. During the tapering or cutting phase, body builders significantly decrease their calorie intake. During this special phase of calorie and carbohydrate restriction, protein needs increase to 1.8-2.0 grams of protein per kilogram body weight to compensate for the use of protein for energy during this hypocaloric phase."

    So g=grams protein, kg=kilograms body weight
    Maintenance:
    1.2g/kg
    Building:
    1.4g/kg to 1.8g/kg
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Jun 05, 2010 5:02 AM GMT
    heckyeah09 said
    tommysguns2000 saidu said 1 gram per pound of body weight for athletes.

    duh...that's what we've said all along...



    i thought the whole 1 gram/pound thing for athletes has been around for a while now.




    It has....this is old news dudes....Bud
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Jun 05, 2010 6:24 AM GMT
    mybud said
    heckyeah09 said
    tommysguns2000 saidu said 1 gram per pound of body weight for athletes.

    duh...that's what we've said all along...



    i thought the whole 1 gram/pound thing for athletes has been around for a while now.




    It has....this is old news dudes....Bud


    I don't know if you look at the page I linked above it says that for maintenance it should be about .54 grams per pound body weight and for building about .64 to .82 grams per pound body weight.
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    Jun 20, 2010 7:17 AM GMT
    KFC Grilled Double-Down: 61 grams of protein, 460 calories, 210 calories from fat. Perfect for muscle building...and tasty, too!
    http://www.kfc.com/nutrition/pdf/kfc_nutrition.pdf
    PS: A little high on the sodium, though, weighing in at 1430 milligrams.
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    Jun 20, 2010 9:24 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidKFC Grilled Double-Down: 61 grams of protein, 460 calories, 210 calories from fat. Perfect for muscle building...and tasty, too!
    http://www.kfc.com/nutrition/pdf/kfc_nutrition.pdf
    PS: A little high on the sodium, though, weighing in at 1430 milligrams.


    Mhmmmm.... coronary heart attack


    I'll take two... don't forget the rich creamery butter! icon_twisted.gif
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    Jun 20, 2010 9:39 AM GMT
    Buffhunk64 said. Although protein is needed for bone development, excessive protein over the long term might also cause calcium to be excreted from the bones, increasing the risk of osteoporosis. .



    This was once thought to always happen with high protein diets. There are precautions one can take to prevent calcium loss. When protein (animal more than plant protein) is metabolized, acid is produced. The body compensates for the acidosis by leeching calcium from the bones. Calcium is lost in the urine. The loss of calcium from the bone results in osteopenia and eventually osteoporosis. The bone loss can be prevented by increasing the oral intake of calcium.icon_smile.gif
    Some nutritionists also recommend fruit juices (which are alkalotic) to treat the acidosis.

    There are studies that have shown that elderly women with osteoporotic fractures that are given supplemental protein along with vitamin D and calcium develop more bone mass than women that did not supplement with protein

    If your calcium intake is adequate, and you are not acidic. There should be no issues with calcium loss. It is probable that your bones may be stronger as a result of the protein.

    I would assume that massive amounts of protein could result in acidosis that could overwhelm the compensatory mechanisms and calcium loss would result.

    http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/87/5/1567S
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    Jun 25, 2010 6:57 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidKFC Grilled Double-Down: 61 grams of protein, 460 calories, 210 calories from fat. Perfect for muscle building...and tasty, too!
    http://www.kfc.com/nutrition/pdf/kfc_nutrition.pdf
    PS: A little high on the sodium, though, weighing in at 1430 milligrams.


    So delicious. Dr. Atkins would shed a buttery tear were he still with us.