Jiu Jitsu? Anyone? I tried it out and loved it... but...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2010 12:34 PM GMT
    The problem is that I already started a membership for the gym which costs me $80 per month and find that to be quite expensive. Starting Jiu Jitsu would be $150 per month (or 1600 for the year) and can go to any class during the week (for as many classes) and for some reason I can justify paying for that but cannot justify $80 for a gym membership. I do have to choose as my overall budget for physical health is quite a stretch. Even $80 is quite expensive for me. If I do have to make a compromise maybe I can find a very cheap gym just to work out and still do the $150 for jiu jitsu classes.

    Do you think $150 per month is about right or is that too much? or affordable enough?

    What would you do if you were on a strict budget?

    I am sorry that this comes down to the fees but working out seems to be less affordable than I thought. I do run and bike outside which I have found to be immensely beneficial to my overall health! I enjoyed jiu jitsu; not for the reasons everyone would instantly think on here... LOL icon_eek.gificon_cool.gif

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    Jun 12, 2010 12:50 PM GMT
    Do whatever makes you happiest. Otherwise you won't stick with it.
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    Jun 12, 2010 12:56 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidDo whatever makes you happiest. Otherwise you won't stick with it.


    That's a very honest and simple solution. Thank you. Probably martial arts will be the winner here.
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    Jun 12, 2010 2:14 PM GMT
    My Tae Kwon Do classes are $130 per month, so it seems like the price is in the range you would expect.
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    Jun 13, 2010 6:31 AM GMT
    Christian73 saidMy Tae Kwon Do classes are $130 per month, so it seems like the price is in the range you would expect.


    Christian, I guess the price is about right then. I appreciate it, thanks.
  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    Jun 13, 2010 7:29 AM GMT
    yeah it depends really, your area and style. I tutor private and also choreograph which is highly enjoyable. good luck, jui jitsu is a wonderful art form , choppy in its execution but gets the job done. try karate (open hand fight
    ing) powerful and cheaper , you learn the basics. good luck bro.
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    Jun 13, 2010 7:34 AM GMT
    Muay Thai here... Since 16 years old icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 13, 2010 11:40 PM GMT
    KARATE1974 saidyeah it depends really, your area and style. I tutor private and also choreograph which is highly enjoyable. good luck, jui jitsu is a wonderful art form , choppy in its execution but gets the job done. try karate (open hand fight
    ing) powerful and cheaper , you learn the basics. good luck bro.


    Thank you, I guess it comes down to personal preference. I sure do feel being worked out from it. What do you mean by saying "[jiu jitsu] gets the job done"?
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    Jun 13, 2010 11:54 PM GMT
    Instead of a gym membership, you can pick up some weights, maybe dumbbells with removable weights and a bench, then put the money towards the classes. If you get a book such as Ultimate Dumbbell Guide by Myatt Murphy you can create a very complete program for yourself.
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    Jun 14, 2010 12:08 AM GMT
    BMWE60 saidMuay Thai here... Since 16 years old icon_biggrin.gif
    Thai food is nommy. Just sayin. icon_wink.gif
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    Jun 14, 2010 1:01 AM GMT

    I teach a financial fitness course for a local nonprofit. One of the most important skills we teach is getting people to not make reflexive decisions about whether to spend or not, but to think about them (at least initially).

    If you can afford the martial arts fee without putting yourself in a really uncomfortable position with regard to things you really need: food, shelter, transportation, clothes, etc, then it comes down to how important it is to you and what you would be willing to give up to have it. A night out once a week? Nice to have but not necessary wardrobe updates? Trading down in transportation ? Skipping an annual vacation? Or some combination of steps?

    You should allocate your money toward things that matter most to you and away from things that matter less. It sounds simple and intuitive, but very few people actually seem to do it!

    Send me a private note if you want any more detail on this.

    Best of luck.

  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    Jun 14, 2010 1:18 AM GMT
    readr said
    KARATE1974 saidyeah it depends really, your area and style. I tutor private and also choreograph which is highly enjoyable. good luck, jui jitsu is a wonderful art form , choppy in its execution but gets the job done. try karate (open hand fight
    ing) powerful and cheaper , you learn the basics. good luck bro.


    Thank you, I guess it comes down to personal preference. I sure do feel being worked out from it. What do you mean by saying "[jiu jitsu] gets the job done"?


    In self defense i feel jui jitsu is more practical, its "choppy" meaning grappling and choppier, bone break, throwing body movements. it is closer to apply in a "street" fight if you ever got into one. karate is great for its form and art. I have been doing it since i was 9. Karate wouldnt help me in a "street" fight but i would employ my ninjitsu, kung fu, jeet kune do or tae kwon do training in confrontation.

    here's the deal, karate schools make no money so they wrap you into contracts like cell phones. take some self defense classes at the local college or get a private tutor (from a MARTIAL ARTS SCHOOL) NOT craigslist, and do some private training to see if you even like it. its great exercise.
    any more questions feel free to ask my fellow greek

    angelo
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Jun 14, 2010 1:42 AM GMT
    Are we talking about a legit BJJ gym, with a decent competitive record, or just a random (japanese/dan zen/etc) jiu-jitsu place?
    If the former then $150 for unlimited is a good price (good BJJ instruction tends to be steep). If the latter then you can find something similar for nothing.

    Personally, if I had to choose, I'd take BJJ over a regular gym membership. Not least of all because I can improvise most of my weight routine at home (assuming I'm not shooting for BB size). BJJ is also a great workout. (Though as always diet's huge, for general fitness.)

    As others have said: do what you love.
    Or, as it's been put: the best gym is the one you go to.

    (If you're considering a long-term contract I do feel the need to tell you that most people don't stick with it. Part of the reason that most BJJ guys are pretty chill is that the steep learning curve combined with the highly active/competitive nature of training weeds out anyone with more ego than determination -- which is most people. It's easy getting your but kicked for the first couple months, but at some point it becomes deeply frustrating as you feel like you should be better than you are [a lot of it is body/hip coordination that hasn't been developed].
    If you stick with it it's awesome though.)