What to look for in a personal trainer?

  • ThePsychonaut

    Posts: 27

    Jun 21, 2010 12:30 PM GMT
    So I've decided if I want to progress any further I need some professional help, but as I've never had a trainer before I thought I'd ask for some advice from you guys.

    What should I be looking for in a trainer?
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    Jun 21, 2010 2:08 PM GMT
    Hot body and very cute.

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    Jun 21, 2010 2:44 PM GMT
    shotgun saidHot body and very cute.



    ...don't forget the killer smile!
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Jun 21, 2010 3:03 PM GMT
    It's all about how his basket looks as you're looking up at him while he spots you doing your bench press. If that doesn't motivate you, nothing will icon_eek.gif
  • NashRugger

    Posts: 1089

    Jun 21, 2010 3:07 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidIt's all about how his basket looks as you're looking up at him while he spots you doing your bench press. If that doesn't motivate you, nothing will icon_eek.gif

    lol
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    Jun 21, 2010 3:18 PM GMT
    ThePsychonaut saidWhat should I be looking for in a trainer?


    As much as I like the previous answers... icon_lol.gif

    I think you want to find one who seems to genuinely understand your goals. You may want to "interview" (i.e., have short conversations with) several potential trainers before you select one. Even after you select one, consider it a trial for the first few sessions, and be willing to switch if you feel that the dynamic between you isn't what you really want.

  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 21, 2010 4:00 PM GMT
    ask about their certifications and qualifications. if all they have to offer is a basic certification i say pass. look for people who have actual degrees in fitness-related areas, such as sports nutrition, particularly a masters and not just a bachelors. this is particularly important if they start recommending supplements to you (are they recommending based off experience or because they actually know the science of creatine?). keep in mind trainers make a commission off getting you to buy products in the gym so pay attention to if they're trying to get you to buy things you don't need just to fatten their paychecks. most gyms also give you one free training session so don't be afraid to request a session to test out the guy/girl. the training session will let you see how they listen to you: give them a set of demands and see how they respond. the problem (ok, one of many problems) with my trainer was that she didn't listen to me. i'd tell her not to over work me (we trained in the mornings) because i worked as a cyclist and needed to do six hours of cycling right after; she instead killed me on a leg routine one day that left me sore for two weeks. also pay attention to how they correct your form. i intentionally will start out with bad form just to see if they are spotting it. if they don't say anything, then they're not worth your money.

    finally, the best advice i can give you is don't be afraid to quit with them at any time. just because they rocked for a few sessions doesn't mean you need to stick with them if things go south for whatever reason. if something is too much for your body and they disagree put down the weights and say "no, please don't tell me how much my body can handle. i think i'd know better than you. We're done for today."

    despite the value of a good trainer, a trainer doesn't replace you as the ultimate watchdog for your body. you still have to be on your toes and respond to things your trainer isn't catching or contradicting.
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    Jun 21, 2010 5:34 PM GMT
    What FitExecutive and Calibro said is right on the money. I hired a personal trainer at my gym. We did great for the first 2 sessions and then things went south so I found one that I liked at another gym, same thing. Then I interviewed several of them at both gyms and ones that had their own studios. I selected one that had his own studio, had a degree in exercise science and a degree in nutrition and he is the one that I stuck with for a while. Unfortunately he was in a very bad accident and will not be able to train for quite a while. Sometimes it might take a while to find the right one, but stick with it because when you do, it will be a great experience and you will reach the goals that you want to achieve.
  • darkeyedresol...

    Posts: 171

    Jun 21, 2010 5:44 PM GMT
    I don't think having a certification rather than a degree makes you a less than trainer. Many upscale gyms will require trainers to have more than one certification, which would seemingly make them more knowledgeable.You might want to look more into experience and their clients, what kind of people they usually work with. You might want to see if you can call any of those former clients and see how they feel.

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    Jun 21, 2010 5:46 PM GMT
    I read an article in a (straight) men's health mag that warned against choosing a trainer based upon their appearance - having a great body doesn't necessarily mean they'll be interested in helping you to achieve the same.

    I'd have a "taster" session and test their coaching/client service skills, i.e. the amount of attention they pay to you and what you're doing.

    Seen way too many fit/hot/built personal trainers in my gym whose eyes are everywhere except on the person they're supposed to be training ...
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    Jun 21, 2010 6:17 PM GMT
    ThePsychonaut saidSo I've decided if I want to progress any further I need some professional help, but as I've never had a trainer before I thought I'd ask for some advice from you guys.

    What should I be looking for in a trainer?


    You should find someone who has the proper credentials (thats number 1)

    Having/making a good rapport with a trainer is essential if you are looking to train with him(or her) long term (thats number 2)

    You need someone who will hold you accountable, be motivating, inspirational, and empathetic, without being overly pushy, bossy, or over the top (unless that's what you want....and that's number 3).

    Cuteness, and attractiveness come later.
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    Jun 21, 2010 7:45 PM GMT
    You should look for someone with a knowledge of human anatomy and the bodies nutritional needs first and foremost.
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    Jun 21, 2010 8:40 PM GMT
    I would seek first and foremost rapport. I know alot of trainers who have all these pieces of paper but are really rude and not enthusiastic. Personality will inspire you more than their knowledge.
  • sportsjockla

    Posts: 498

    Jun 21, 2010 9:35 PM GMT
    Talk to his clients. If his clients don't have results, then you won't either.
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    Jun 21, 2010 9:36 PM GMT
    It is absolutely essential that he has a fat tight ass!
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    Jun 21, 2010 9:42 PM GMT
    sportsjockla saidTalk to his clients. If his clients don't have results, then you won't either.


    Agreed but remember people also think they can be miracle workers when clients refuse to make lifestyle changes...
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    Jun 21, 2010 9:56 PM GMT
    /agree with references.
    Find one that doesn't care about your personal life and only talks to you about training! The best mistake is training with someone you could see as a friend. Gabbing is counterproductive.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 21, 2010 10:04 PM GMT
    darkeyedresolve saidI don't think having a certification rather than a degree makes you a less than trainer. Many upscale gyms will require trainers to have more than one certification, which would seemingly make them more knowledgeable.You might want to look more into experience and their clients, what kind of people they usually work with. You might want to see if you can call any of those former clients and see how they feel.



    every trainer should have a certification, but you'd be surprised how easy it is to get one of those. someone who spent six years and opposed to six months earning a degree rather than just a certification typically knows more. it's not to say that all trainers without advanced degrees suck and that trainers with them don't, but more often than not the more certifications and degrees a trainer holds indicates a high skill set and knowledge of the body.
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    Jun 21, 2010 10:07 PM GMT
    Is he certified, does your gym support him and above all doesicon_rolleyes.gif he walk the talk. If he's not in great shape, look for someone else.
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    Jun 21, 2010 10:20 PM GMT
    My Trainer is a great guy. He's supportive, he encourages, he punishes and most of all he listens to what I want. We had a discussion about what I want to achieve and he listened to every word and has tailored a program to suit me and my goals.

    He is also a professional athlete and competes internationally.

    The gym is of the reputable variety which adds to the overall experience.




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    Jun 21, 2010 10:31 PM GMT
    I agree with most of the comments above, with the exception of one.

    I think the guy or woman should be obviously very fit. I am not talking about sexual attraction here. But if the trainer can't get his or her life together enough to serve as a role model by being fit, and also by proving that their knowledge of training works, even for themselves, I'd say I would distrust that trainer.
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    Jun 21, 2010 10:55 PM GMT
    I guess it all depends on what fits you...Kinda like finding a shrink or a doctor you like
  • ThePsychonaut

    Posts: 27

    Jun 22, 2010 12:00 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the replies guys its a lot to consider, I'll do as FitExecutive suggested and do a little interviewing now that I have a clearer idea of what to look for.

    -Qualified (preferably with a degree over a certificate)
    -Pays attention to my goals
    -Listens to what I have to say about my body
    -Don't be afraid to end it if it doesn't work out

    So with that in mind I'll start looking, thanks again for the help I shall keep you all appraised of my journey.
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    Jun 22, 2010 12:30 PM GMT
    He should be gay, ripped, and wear tight/ revealing clothing
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    Jun 22, 2010 12:37 PM GMT
    Talk to his other clients. See if they've made gains with his training. It doesn't matter if he's certified and ripped if his clients don't progress.