Tofu?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 11, 2010 2:33 AM GMT
    mnboy saidTofu isn't made to taste like meat. It is made for people who don't like meat so why would it taste like it... but it is nutritional.


    I doubt this statement is true! This would be your American/Western view of a meat alternative; which probably isn't shared at all by the Japanese, Koreans, or Chinese.
  • metta

    Posts: 55569

    Nov 11, 2010 2:49 AM GMT

    The taste depends on what you use to flavor it with.

    There are various textures of tofu available. Freezing it can also change it.
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    Nov 11, 2010 2:53 AM GMT
    Do you like bacon? Why don't you just make yourself a BLT...Bacon, lettuce and tofu sandwichicon_wink.gif
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:11 AM GMT
    Hoooooooooly crap, thanks for the responses everyone, I now have a "firm" (tofu joke!) idea of what I should expect.

    For some reason everytime I thought of tofu I imagined it would be like eating warm Flan icon_eek.gif
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:12 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidI like tofu AND meat.


    This what I kind of want to do, use tofu AND meat, maybe use the tofu to stretch a meal and not have to use as much meat? I think I have an idea of how to do that now thanks to everyones input icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:42 AM GMT
    I love to mix tofu in my salads and pasta! I was raised as a vegetarian baby way up till my teens! up until that point I started adding meats in my diet so that I could pump up on more muscles quicker! then in my forties I went back to a semi-vegetarian diet. At the present time I stopped eating red meat, pork, shrimp and lobster because a year ago my cholesterol level got very high.

    Today I substitute high protein meats with a variety of vegetarian substitutes that are usually much higher in protein then meat or tofu, like legumes (black beans, red kidney beans, lentils, chick peas, and a whole dozen more varieties) Tilapia, Cod, or Salmon fish (my favorites) nuts (almonds, walnuts, pecans) Spinach, broccoli, and the least goes on!


    Leandro ♥
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:48 AM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    bhp91126 saidI hate Tofu. Tastes disgusting and the softer consistencies make me gag.

    DoomsDayAlpaca saidWhat are some of your favorite tofu meals?

    However, Chocoholic guy strikes again:

    This is really good!

    Chocolate Mousse

    Ingredients
    3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips, melted
    1 (12.3-ounce) package reduced-fat extra-firm tofu
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    3 large egg whites
    1/2 cup sugar
    1/4 cup water
    Fat-free whipped topping, thawed (optional)
    Grated chocolate (optional)

    Preparation
    Place chocolate and tofu in a food processor or blender, and process 2 minutes or until smooth.

    Place salt and egg whites in a medium bowl, and beat with a mixer at high speed until stiff peaks form. Combine sugar and water in a small saucepan; bring to a boil. Cook, without stirring, until candy thermometer registers 238°. Pour the hot sugar syrup in a thin stream over egg whites, beating at high speed. Gently stir one-fourth of meringue into the tofu mixture; gently fold in remaining meringue. Spoon 1/2 cup mousse into each of 8 (6-ounce) custard cups. Cover and chill for at least 4 hours. Garnish with whipped topping and grated chocolate, if desired.

    Nutritional Information
    Calories:147 (34% from fat)
    Fat:5.6g (sat 3.3g,mono 1.8g,poly 0.5g)
    Protein:5.2g
    Carbohydrate:22.5g
    Fiber:0.2g
    Cholesterol:0.0mg
    Iron:0.9mg
    Sodium:134mg
    Calcium:26mg


    Fail. Tofu has virtually no taste at all. You must just not like the texture.



    Wow Mock, fail? Was that necessary? Perhaps he'd been eating pre-flavoured ones like others went on to mention later.

    -Doug
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:50 AM GMT
    Yea, Mock is fail!

    Anyway, this is one of favorite dishes made with tofu and pork.

    Mabo Tofu

    1 block cotton tofu, about 1 lb
    ½ lb ground pork

    Seasonings:

    1 Tbsp vegetable oil
    2 clove garlic, finely chopped
    1 Tbsp finely chopped fresh ginger
    ½ negi or 4 or 5 green onions
    white part only, finely chopped
    1 Tbsp tobanjan

    Sauce:

    1 cup water
    2 tbsp sake
    3 tbsp miso
    ½ tsp sugar
    1 Tbsp katakuriko/corn starch
    mixed with 1 Tablespoon water
    For Serving:

    1 teaspoon sansho powder
    ½ Tablespoon Japanese sesame oil
    green onions, green part only, cut into rings
    4 cups steamed rice
    Wrap tofu in a towel, add some weight (plate with a can of tomatoes or whatever), and let the tofu drain for about 30 minutes. Cut tofu into ½-inch cubes. Set aside. Some recipes call for boiling the tofu, or for stir-frying the cubes with sesame oil, but I opted for the easy way.

    In a two cup measuring cup, combine water, sake, miso, and sugar. Stir until the sugar and miso dissolves. Set aside.

    Heat oil in a wok on low heat, add garlic, ginger, and onion. Stir fry for a few minutes. Add the tobanjan, give it a stir, the add the ground pork. Break up the chunks of meat until the color changes. Pour the sauce mixture into the wok and bring it up to a simmer. Add tofu cubes, and simmer for about 10 minutes. Mix the corstarch with the water and stir it into the wok. Stir gently, so as not to break the tofu cubes, until the sauce is thickened and glossy.

    Serve in bowls on top of Japanese rice. Sprinkle a little shansho powder and sesame oil on each bowl. Garnish with the onions.
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:26 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 said
    mocktwinkie said
    It just happens to be harder on the iodine levels in the body which is important for the thyroid. The idea that it will ruin the thyroid is completely ridiculous. Supplementing with a supplement containing iodine will prevent any possible issue of this -- everyone should be supplementing anyway.


    Isoflavones are inhibitors of the thyroid peroxidase which makes T3 and T4. Genistein and daidzein are the principal isoflavones in soy products. They really has nothing to do with iodine levels, but you can overcome the goitrogenic properties of soy with iodine supplementation. I do not recommend anybody with hypothyroidism using any soy supplements (with much higher isoflavone concentrations), but soy foods are probably OK when eaten in moderation.

    My salt is iodinated, BTW. Everything in moderation.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16571087Thus, collectively the findings provide little evidence that in euthyroid, iodine-replete individuals, soy foods, or isoflavones adversely affect thyroid function. In contrast, some evidence suggests that soy foods, by inhibiting absorption, may increase the dose of thyroid hormone required by hypothyroid patients. However, hypothyroid adults need not avoid soy foods. In addition, there remains a theoretical concern based on in vitro and animal data that in individuals with compromised thyroid function and/or whose iodine intake is marginal soy foods may increase risk of developing clinical hypothyroidism. Therefore, it is important for soy food consumers to make sure their intake of iodine is adequate.


    http://www.epa.gov/edrlupvx/inventory/FDA-17.htmlSoybean and its products have been reported to be goitrogenic to humans. Soy products in infant food formulas and wide consumption of soy products demands an examination of the antithyroid activity. Extracts of soybean contain components identified as genistein and daidzein that inhibit thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the key enzyme in thyroid hormone synthesis. These compounds are potent inhibitors of TPO-catalyzed tyrosine iodination and thyroid hormone synthesis (coupling). Incubation of either isoflavone with TPO in the presence of H2O2 irreversibly inactivated the enzyme, but prior addition of iodide ion abolished enzyme inactivation. In the presence iodide ion, the isoflavones were alternate substrates for TPO-catalyzed iodination yielding mono-, di- and tri-iodoisoflavones. Thus, in both the presence and absence of iodide ion, inhibition of thyroid hormone synthesis by the soy isoflavones is predicted although the effects of suicide substrates are predicted to be of longer duration.




    BTW, I don't usually talk shop to patients, but try to put it in everyday language. "Screwing up your thyroid" was my way of putting the above in 4 words to avoid arcane terminology in this forum.


    I was trying to put it in simple terms that most people would understand but thanks for your elaboration.
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:27 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    mocktwinkie said
    bhp91126 saidI hate Tofu. Tastes disgusting and the softer consistencies make me gag.

    DoomsDayAlpaca saidWhat are some of your favorite tofu meals?

    However, Chocoholic guy strikes again:

    This is really good!

    Chocolate Mousse

    Ingredients
    3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips, melted
    1 (12.3-ounce) package reduced-fat extra-firm tofu
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    3 large egg whites
    1/2 cup sugar
    1/4 cup water
    Fat-free whipped topping, thawed (optional)
    Grated chocolate (optional)

    Preparation
    Place chocolate and tofu in a food processor or blender, and process 2 minutes or until smooth.

    Place salt and egg whites in a medium bowl, and beat with a mixer at high speed until stiff peaks form. Combine sugar and water in a small saucepan; bring to a boil. Cook, without stirring, until candy thermometer registers 238°. Pour the hot sugar syrup in a thin stream over egg whites, beating at high speed. Gently stir one-fourth of meringue into the tofu mixture; gently fold in remaining meringue. Spoon 1/2 cup mousse into each of 8 (6-ounce) custard cups. Cover and chill for at least 4 hours. Garnish with whipped topping and grated chocolate, if desired.

    Nutritional Information
    Calories:147 (34% from fat)
    Fat:5.6g (sat 3.3g,mono 1.8g,poly 0.5g)
    Protein:5.2g
    Carbohydrate:22.5g
    Fiber:0.2g
    Cholesterol:0.0mg
    Iron:0.9mg
    Sodium:134mg
    Calcium:26mg


    Fail. Tofu has virtually no taste at all. You must just not like the texture.



    Wow Mock, fail? Was that necessary? Perhaps he'd been eating pre-flavoured ones like others went on to mention later.

    -Doug


    You are right. Was a pointless comment. Apologies
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:30 PM GMT
    tofu... evil stuff,

    and i'm vegetarian.
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:34 PM GMT
    Tofu, if cooked properly, is DELICIOUS! Cooked improperly, however, makes it very gag worthy.

    Here are some recipes from eatingwell.com that I use quite often. Also, letting the tofu marinate overnight after it has cooked adds even more flavor.

    Szechuan Tofu & Green Bean Stir-Fry
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/szechuan_tofu_stir_fry.html
    MV7063.JPG

    Spinach & Sun-Dried Tomato Stuffed Pizza
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/spinach_tomato_stuffed_pizza.html
    MV7205.JPG

    Tofu Parmigiana
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tofu_parmigiana.html
    MV6444.JPG

    Sichuan-Style Tofu with Mushrooms
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sichuan_style_tofu_with_mushrooms.html
    MV4663.JPG
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    Nov 11, 2010 4:36 PM GMT
    cmhoh1985 saidTofu, if cooked properly, is DELICIOUS! Cooked improperly, however, makes it very gag worthy.

    Here are some recipes from eatingwell.com that I use quite often. Also, letting the tofu marinate overnight after it has cooked adds even more flavor.

    Szechuan Tofu & Green Bean Stir-Fry
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/szechuan_tofu_stir_fry.html
    MV7063.JPG

    Spinach & Sun-Dried Tomato Stuffed Pizza
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/spinach_tomato_stuffed_pizza.html
    MV7205.JPG

    Tofu Parmigiana
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tofu_parmigiana.html
    MV6444.JPG

    Sichuan-Style Tofu with Mushrooms
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sichuan_style_tofu_with_mushrooms.html
    MV4663.JPG


    Great!
  • tongun18

    Posts: 594

    Nov 11, 2010 4:43 PM GMT
    Import said

    ohhh weeee ooooo KILLER TOFU!!!



    hahaha, killer tofu. the beets rule!

    tofu however does not. perhaps adding bacon to it will help. as i've said before, bacon makes everything better!
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    Nov 11, 2010 5:06 PM GMT
    I'm currently on a holiday in Taipei, Taiwan and have sample a million ways of eating tofu, bean curd and its other form. It's pretty amazing and not at all the simple, squishy loaf we're accustomed to in America.

    To get it to taste like bacon it has to be seasoned, smoked and texturized.

    I had a meatless sloppy joe and swore it was ground beef. I think you're just gonn have to experiment as you go along.

    Tofu is good. There's a reason why all of Asia loves it.
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    Nov 11, 2010 5:11 PM GMT
    Studinprogress saidWish the campus diner served seitan icon_confused.gif Typical college food: 90% of all food items must be either deep fried or smothered in fat.


    Man, eating well in college is so hard if you're not flush with cash.
    I litterally shudder a little thinking of those days. (The fact that the cafeteria closed at 7:00!!!icon_mad.gif, when we were up till god knows what hours studying. Either you had rich parents who gave you money or you got good at sneaking food out of the cafeteria icon_twisted.gif That's not even worrying about what food was actually available. [Hint: get as many of the instant oatmeal packets as you can!])
  • LJay

    Posts: 11644

    Nov 11, 2010 5:17 PM GMT
    The choloclate mousse above looks good. Hmm.....

    A vegetarian restaurant here, since closed, used to serve a chocolate tofu pie that would put cheescake to shame. The stuff was soooo good! Does anyone have such a recipe?
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    Nov 11, 2010 5:23 PM GMT
    The key to tofu is that it takes on the flavor of what you put it in.

    The other key to tofu is that its tofu, not something else.

    Take a bit to familiarize yourself with the different kinds of tofu. There's "silken" tofu which is much finer and good for if you want to blend it up for smoothies and things. Then there's "normal" tofu which is what you usually use for cooking. Each variety also comes in varying "firmness" depending on if you want it to stay together or crumble. They also make pre-spiced ones, but I don't use them.

    Good in most things you'd use diced chicken for. Stir fry, stuff over noodles, etc. It tends to not do as well in soups.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Nov 11, 2010 6:04 PM GMT
    Tofu's a terrific blank slate: it tastes like whatever you make it taste like. I don't mind the texture so much, but if that's a problem for you then either:

    1) puree it and cook it like scrambled eggs
    2) thinly slice or cube it, then sear it
    3) deep-fry it

    If none of those work for you, though, then try tempeh - it's made from cultured whole soybeans, which means it has a complex, nutty flavor and a heftier texture. Seitan is also fantastic stuff; one of my favorite veg restaurants in the world (the Chicago Diner) uses it in many of their adapted recipes, including reubens, "beef" fajitas, and "chicken" pot pies.
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    Nov 12, 2010 10:05 AM GMT
    So I picked some Tofu up today guys and I was TOTALLY surprised.

    My local superfresh had it for only $2.99 per package, each package was 14 oz which is like 4.5 servings it says, I was already impressed. On top of that they also had the brand of Tofu they carry has a cool 'plus' style that is fortified with vitamins often found in meats, even more impressed. I was sold I saw it was the SAME price as the non enriched kind. I picked up 4 containers icon_biggrin.gif 3 Extra firm and1 Firm.
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    Nov 13, 2010 6:15 AM GMT
    So i chopped up some tofu, put it in some tupperware, froze it, and I'm wondering if I take it out to thaw and only take what I need can I refreeze it...

    I should have thought that through better.
  • metta

    Posts: 55569

    Nov 13, 2010 6:23 AM GMT
    DoomsDayAlpaca saidSo i chopped up some tofu, put it in some tupperware, froze it, and I'm wondering if I take it out to thaw and only take what I need can I refreeze it...

    I should have thought that through better.


    hmmm....freezing it may change the consistency of it. Let us know how it goes for you.
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    Nov 13, 2010 6:28 AM GMT
    DoomsDayAlpaca saidSo i chopped up some tofu, put it in some tupperware, froze it, and I'm wondering if I take it out to thaw and only take what I need can I refreeze it...

    I should have thought that through better.


    Not the best idea... lol
    I would stick to the recipes that have it chopped up or pureed in few of nastiness from the weird texture that occurs.
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    Nov 13, 2010 7:19 AM GMT
    Well I just froze it because when it comes to food prep...I have a habit of streamlining things for later use. I know it gets a different feel to the tofu...I'm just wondering about it going bad.
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    Nov 13, 2010 7:21 AM GMT
    DoomsDayAlpaca saidWell I just froze it because when it comes to food prep...I have a habit of streamlining things for later use. I know it gets a different feel to the tofu...I'm just wondering about it going bad.


    It'll keep for a while, frozen... probably until your mid 50's. Lol, Ive never had tofu go bad on me and I use to be a strict vegetarian of 8 years. Now I cheat now and then with chicken or turkey. icon_redface.gif