MY Prometheus Review!

  • Just_Tim

    Posts: 1723

    Jun 13, 2012 6:04 PM GMT
    I watched it last night and loved it... Really... I want to see it again, maybe twice... A little disappointed that it set up for a sequel, but I guess that's something to look forward to 20 years from now...
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    Jun 13, 2012 6:10 PM GMT
    abelian0 saidYou know, I am so incredibly tired of science fiction that is informed by a religious ethos. This movie, The Worthing Saga (or anything written by Orson Scott Card really), The Matrix, Battlestar Galactica and many others are prime examples of this. They take fantastic technology, and then imbue it with properties of good and evil, good of course representing a twisted status quo 'natural' order. 'Evil' is then the technology/person/organization trying to subvert that order.

    Please.

    What the hell is so wrong with wanting to live longer? Can someone explain this to me? Isn't that kind of the exercise we engage in with modern medicine, and isn't that kind of a really great thing? I mean if you like the so-called natural order of things, why even bother creating technology in the first place?

    I think the real purpose of this second-rate garbage is to restore dualism and create non-overlapping magisteria for science and religion. Religion's only real selling point at this juncture is the promise of an afterlife (by the way - irony that they're the ones selling the idea that circumventing death technologically is inherently bad). If science really starts chipping away at that one, there goes tithing.

    It amounts to an elevation of mysticism, human suffering, death and ignorance in my estimation, and is the antithesis of what good science fiction should inspire us towards.


    mhmh interesting...what do you think of the Dead Space games in terms of storyline?
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    Jun 13, 2012 6:27 PM GMT
    abelian0 saidYou know, I am so incredibly tired of science fiction that is informed by a religious ethos. This movie, The Worthing Saga (or anything written by Orson Scott Card really), The Matrix, Battlestar Galactica and many others are prime examples of this. They take fantastic technology, and then imbue it with properties of good and evil, good of course representing a twisted status quo 'natural' order. 'Evil' is then the technology/person/organization trying to subvert that order.

    Please.

    What the hell is so wrong with wanting to live longer? Can someone explain this to me? Isn't that kind of the exercise we engage in with modern medicine, and isn't that kind of a really great thing? I mean if you like the so-called natural order of things, why even bother creating technology in the first place?

    I think the real purpose of this second-rate garbage is to restore dualism and create non-overlapping magisteria for science and religion. Religion's only real selling point at this juncture is the promise of an afterlife (by the way - irony that they're the ones selling the idea that circumventing death technologically is inherently bad). If science really starts chipping away at that one, there goes tithing.

    It amounts to an elevation of mysticism, human suffering, death and ignorance in my estimation, and is the antithesis of what good science fiction should inspire us towards.


    i think you're onto something. i really despise the thinly-veiled theological scifi story archs of BSG and Matrix, inter alia. this might be because i was raised without formal religious practice, and so i find the whole discourse kinda foreign and abstract.

    but scifi has provided a boundless paradigm from which to examine and critique other areas of life, including politics, economics, science, nature and environmental sustainability, and society in general. why should it not also provide a platform to question our faith? in fact it should... but that doesn't make the Matrix or BSG any more tolerable when there's no fight sequences, cliff hangers, and too much tortured dialogue.
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    Jun 13, 2012 6:35 PM GMT
    kingmo said
    abelian0 saidYou know, I am so incredibly tired of science fiction that is informed by a religious ethos. This movie, The Worthing Saga (or anything written by Orson Scott Card really), The Matrix, Battlestar Galactica and many others are prime examples of this. They take fantastic technology, and then imbue it with properties of good and evil, good of course representing a twisted status quo 'natural' order. 'Evil' is then the technology/person/organization trying to subvert that order.

    Please.

    What the hell is so wrong with wanting to live longer? Can someone explain this to me? Isn't that kind of the exercise we engage in with modern medicine, and isn't that kind of a really great thing? I mean if you like the so-called natural order of things, why even bother creating technology in the first place?

    I think the real purpose of this second-rate garbage is to restore dualism and create non-overlapping magisteria for science and religion. Religion's only real selling point at this juncture is the promise of an afterlife (by the way - irony that they're the ones selling the idea that circumventing death technologically is inherently bad). If science really starts chipping away at that one, there goes tithing.

    It amounts to an elevation of mysticism, human suffering, death and ignorance in my estimation, and is the antithesis of what good science fiction should inspire us towards.


    i think you're onto something. i really despise the thinly-veiled theological scifi story archs of BSG and Matrix, inter alia. this might be because i was raised without formal religious practice, and so i find the whole discourse kinda foreign and abstract.

    but scifi has provided a boundless paradigm from which to examine and critique other areas of life, including politics, economics, science, nature and environmental sustainability, and society in general. why should it not also provide a platform to question our faith? in fact it should... but that doesn't make the Matrix or BSG any more tolerable when there's no fight sequences, cliff hangers, and too much tortured dialogue.


    I agree with kingmo there is nothing wrong with questioning. That is EXACTLY what sci-fi is about, questioning things about life! However, the validity of what they are trying to provide an answer will only have merit about how logically and ethically they approach the issue. If they try to solve it with a maelstrom of action sequences (like The Matrix), then the movie ultimately failed.
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    Jun 13, 2012 6:52 PM GMT
    Ive got to say... I"m incredibly impressed by the responses to this thread.
    There are some unusually complex and insightful comments and analysis on here-pertaining to the movie PROMETHEUS- especially in regards to the religious
    over (or under) tones woven in to so many of these types of science fiction
    projects. The original review was quite good and some of the comments made after have been very thought provoking.

    Whoever believes the stereotype that hot sexy built men are usually stupid hasnt checked out the Real Jock website....

    BTW, I thought the movie was fairly sucessful overall--for me,it was just nice to
    see an old fashioned big budget science fiction space travel "B" movie again..
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    Jun 13, 2012 7:00 PM GMT
    gunpumper said Ive got to say... I"m incredibly impressed by the responses to this thread.
    There are some unusually complex and insightful comments and analysis on here-pertaining to the movie PROMETHEUS- especially in regards to the religious
    over (or under) tones woven in to so many of these types of science fiction
    projects. The original review was quite good and some of the comments made after have been very thought provoking.

    Whoever believes the stereotype that hot sexy built men are usually stupid hasnt checked out the Real Jock website....

    BTW, I thought the movie was fairly sucessful overall--for me,it was just nice to
    see an old fashioned big budget science fiction space travel "B" movie again..


    Thanks for the great comment! I really appreciate it!

    I have another review for 2001, but that is a hard review to do because there is so much things to put in to it. I am still editing my review on that.

    The longest movie I have done a review on has been "El Laberinton del Fauno" or simply short "Pan's Labyrinth". It is one of my favorite movies of all time and I love he del Torro includes Spanish history and art into the making of the film. My review was like 5 pages for that haha.
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    Jun 13, 2012 8:01 PM GMT
    FilmGuy18_notporn said
    abelian0 saidYou know, I am so incredibly tired of science fiction that is informed by a religious ethos. This movie, The Worthing Saga (or anything written by Orson Scott Card really), The Matrix, Battlestar Galactica and many others are prime examples of this. They take fantastic technology, and then imbue it with properties of good and evil, good of course representing a twisted status quo 'natural' order. 'Evil' is then the technology/person/organization trying to subvert that order.

    Please.

    What the hell is so wrong with wanting to live longer? Can someone explain this to me? Isn't that kind of the exercise we engage in with modern medicine, and isn't that kind of a really great thing? I mean if you like the so-called natural order of things, why even bother creating technology in the first place?

    I think the real purpose of this second-rate garbage is to restore dualism and create non-overlapping magisteria for science and religion. Religion's only real selling point at this juncture is the promise of an afterlife (by the way - irony that they're the ones selling the idea that circumventing death technologically is inherently bad). If science really starts chipping away at that one, there goes tithing.

    It amounts to an elevation of mysticism, human suffering, death and ignorance in my estimation, and is the antithesis of what good science fiction should inspire us towards.


    mhmh interesting...what do you think of the Dead Space games in terms of storyline?


    I'm not all that big a fan of Dead Space, though that's more aesthetic than anything. The whole 'Church of Unitology' does synthesize some of the creepier elements of religion though - the obsessive focus on dissolution of self, unblinking faith in the face of horror, the tendency for those who believe in apocalyptic visions to help foster those results and seek confirmation of belief above all else. I find the argument in favor of dissolution of self the most disturbing, to be honest. Then again I'm a libertarian, so what can you do?

    One video game that I really did enjoy was KOTOR II. The entire plot was about establishing the Force as a battle of two sentient entities (light side and dark side), whose battle for supremacy has caused untold suffering. So Kreia, the badass, pretty much sets out on a mission to declare autarky on the Force, and make it serve the inhabitants of the galaxy.

    My own perspective on religion is that were any of them remotely correct, it would be perfectly moral to hate God/the Gods and hope for their destruction. If you have nonfinite power and perfect knowledge, and create this mess, you're a sadist. I rarely see that theme put out into mass media of any sort, and instead usually have to put up with Mormonism being ported into a space opera.
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    Jun 13, 2012 8:06 PM GMT
    I saw it yesterday. I didn't really like it. I mean I understood where they were going with it its just that it was very confusing and just went everywhere and just ended *SPOILER ALERT* in death.
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    Jun 13, 2012 8:19 PM GMT
    (quote)I have another review for 2001, but that is a hard review to do because there is so much things to put in to it. I am still editing my review on that.

    The longest movie I have done a review on has been "El Laberinton del Fauno" or simply short "Pan's Labyrinth". It is one of my favorite movies of all time and I love he del Torro includes Spanish history and art into the making of the film. My review was like 5 pages for that haha.[/quote]

    "2001" is still being dissected and examined 40+ years after it made its debut.
    That is one TOUGH review to do--- I have never really been able to tell whether the movie is far too deep for me to completely understand (I get most of it) or if its meant to be too ambiguous to fully understand...

    Pans Labyrinth-- by del Toro--- is one of the best movies ever!!. To me its this
    generations "Wizard of Oz"...I think he had his hand in "The Orphanage" , too.
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    Jun 13, 2012 8:20 PM GMT
    I agree it is legitimate for science fiction to address religion - in fact my favorite short story is one by Arthur C. Clarke called "The Star".

    My beef is that when religion is ported into sci fi, it usually crystalizes how absurd that set of beliefs are. So you get these morally whackadoodle results, like the sinister implication that extension of life is terrible, the paranoid aversion to artificial intelligence, and the vague sense that technology is holding us back from some pastoral, Rousseau-like ideal.

    Oh my God, when Weyland made mention of David having no soul I almost blew chunks in the theater.

    I wouldn't have a problem if sci fi budgets and mindspace were infinite, but they aren't. And so Ridley Scott's paean to insipid credulity is taking away from a sober presentation of the moral catastrophe that is religious belief when amplified by extraordinary technologies.
  • Machina

    Posts: 419

    Jun 13, 2012 9:11 PM GMT
    abelian0 saidI rarely see that theme put out into mass media of any sort, and instead usually have to put up with Mormonism being ported into a space opera.


    I know exactly what you mean. Having grown-up under the oppressive auspices of mormonism, I nearly fell out of my chair the first time I heard them mention "The Quorum of the 12", "Kobol", etc.. I felt profoundly cheated.

    The writers had a wonderful premise. They created a universe in which mankind created sentient life which rebelled against them and went into hiding. 40 Years later their creation is seeking revenge because the creators happen to be violently flawed. Why couldn't that have been enough? Why did the writers have to devolve into overtly religious themes?

    I don't mind them questioning artificial life as Asimov did in his works, but they could have gone so much deeper and explored truly unique themes. Instead they chose to cheapen and dogmatize their work.
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Jun 13, 2012 9:30 PM GMT
    wow, you were deep. Humm, I am indifferent about this movie. I did not hate it but I can not say I love it. There were so many questions for me. My first question is what the main character's husband turning into. He looked as if he was turning into the aliens that supposedly created us. At the end of the movie she leaves to find them. How will she know how to get to them. The movie was supposed to take place in the future but it shows how the aliens were supposedly created. what was everyone else thoughts about the movie?