Truer words have never been spoken - NBC hate

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    Aug 03, 2012 8:37 PM GMT
    NBC had great coverage of gymnastics 3 olympics ago, because you saw the top teams' performances, and didn't solely focus on 1 or 2 "stars" of the US team. I was VERY disappointed this time around. It felt like I was watching a national championship yet again.
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    Aug 03, 2012 8:38 PM GMT
    Kryptonic saidNBC had great coverage of gymnastics 3 olympics ago, because you saw the top teams' performances, and didn't solely focus on 1 or 2 "stars" of the US team. I was VERY disappointed this time around. It felt like I was watching a national championship yet again.


    Thank you! That's definitely what it feels like to watch ANY international gymnastics event on NBC. Not just the Olympics.
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    Aug 03, 2012 8:42 PM GMT
    Coach_Mike saidNico, what effect do you think Gabby Douglas and the black guy on the men's team will have on getting African American kids in gymnastics programs? I talked to the director of summer camps at the rec department this afternoon and she said no black children were registered for the gymnastics camp. Is gymnastics training financially out of the reach of the disadvantaged kids, minority or not. I'm looking at a whole new area of channeling the disciplinary problems' energies but I don't want to make suggestions that would be a financial burden on the families.


    Is it possible to talk to the local gymnastics clubs and discuss scholarship-like programs? That can be their way to give back to the community. Your students would have to earn the "scholarship", which in itself, might impact positive behavior.

    Also, how did Orozco do it? He was too young to get a job but somehow he was able to get the gymnastics training despite his family not having money.

    EDIT: Found this on Wiki on Orozco
    "He began gymnastics at the age of eight, when his father found a flyer for free gymnastics lessons at a gym in Manhattan. The gym allowed him to be part of a program for children who were socioeconomically disadvantaged"
    This type of program is what I mentioned above.
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    Aug 04, 2012 6:14 AM GMT
    Coach_Mike saidI was upset that NBC didn't broadcast gymnastics in the first hour of primetime when the little girls I teach would have been awake to watch it. Gabby Douglas' gold medal would have done magic for getting little girls and especially those of color interested in the sport. It probably still will but it would have made a greater impact if they could have watched it before their bedtime.


    It's extremely expensive, especially when you get to a competitive level. I met this mom who said she was paying more than $200/ month for gymnastics and that's just for the gym fees, not everything else that comes with it. icon_eek.gif
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1919

    Aug 04, 2012 6:25 AM GMT
    I want the American athletes/teams to do well and win, but I also want to see the other athletes and teams perform and do well, too. I think their focus almost exclusively on Americans shows the unfortunate truth that many Americans are xenophobic and closed-minded towards the rest of the world. I wish it wasn't like that, but we all know people like that.
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    Aug 04, 2012 9:44 PM GMT
    I was extremely upset that they didn't show more of my man *Marcel Nguyen from the German's Gymnastics team routines !! BOOO NBC, oh well, I can always check out other sites for his routines~ !
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    Aug 04, 2012 10:07 PM GMT
    NBC's coverage in general is embarrassing, in that too much time is spent on american competitors ( personal historys, that info is fine, but lell the storys via the internet, or on a later special broadcast ), and too much time is wasted with anecdotal commentary in general. we want to see the competitions, not hear people talk about them. also, they could be a lot more creative about where and when they put up onscreen info, and cut away for commercials. all in all, they leave the impression, which i am sure is accurate, of, that the network has booked the commerical advertisments, and the network is unsure of how to fill the time in between commercial breaks....
  • Muscles25

    Posts: 395

    Aug 04, 2012 11:02 PM GMT
    ECnAZ said
    Unfortunately, gymnastics isn't a major sport in the US, plain and simple. There are dozens of other sports that can complain that they get no coverage at all. The fact that gymnastics gets any coverage in non-Olympic years is the bigger surprise, to me, anyway.

    the other reality is that gymnastics just doesn't have that superstar that's going to draw people to the sport. Mary Lou might be considered the biggest personality the sport in the US has ever seen. A sport like gymnastics NEEDS someone like that to draw attention to itself. And with the current scoring system, as you and I have discussed, it's almost impossible to create a superstar. I believe figure skating achieved a peak in popularity when Michele Kwan started achieving all of her perfect scores, especially for her artistry. She was setting new benchmarks for the sport and that created tremendous interest for years.


    If those unbelievably HOT male gymnasts can't get attention then the world is doomed.

    I heard the NBC commentators discussing why male gymnastics doesn't get the attention and respect and one of the guys said it was because "they wear tights" and "most men aren't comfortable with that." He might as well have just called them "fags." What is this, 1952?

    As for the girls (not women's, they're girls) gymnastics I find it creepy in the extreme. As one sage once said when they wear "sequins and make-up" it ain't a sport. Amen to that. Also, it seems like a pedophile buffet. They are too young.

    Frankly, I don't think anyone should be allowed to participate in the Olympics until they are an adult -- 18 years of age -- if you're not legal, you don't get to compete.
  • Muscles25

    Posts: 395

    Aug 04, 2012 11:05 PM GMT
    waccamatt saidI want the American athletes/teams to do well and win, but I also want to see the other athletes and teams perform and do well, too. I think their focus almost exclusively on Americans shows the unfortunate truth that many Americans are xenophobic and closed-minded towards the rest of the world. I wish it wasn't like that, but we all know people like that.


    Actually, I completely disagree. Have you tried watching the Olympics coverage on other country's TV networks? It's the same or worse. It has nothing to do with "American's." Why is the gut reaction -- of some -- to do the "blame America first" thing? It's kind of sad and pathetic.

    Each country that telecasts the Olympics focuses on their athletes. Why should we be any diffferent?

    If you want to see more, go to the live feeds. But for the vast majority of Americans who watch only during the 4 hours each night ... they want to see Americans. Period.
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    Aug 05, 2012 12:36 AM GMT
    Muscles25 said. Frankly, I don't think anyone should be allowed to participate in the Olympics until they are an adult -- 18 years of age -- if you're not legal, you don't get to compete.


    A new rule was already in place for this Olympics that male gymnasts have to be 18 or older to compete at any major international competition. The minimum age requirement used to be 16, but it was raised recently. Considering there haven't been many male gymnasts younger than 18 who've been that successful, the rule change doesn't affect them much. Most guys peak in their 20s anyway after they've finished puberty.

    The argument is completely chaotic with regard to the women because history has shown most women peak in the sport well before 18. 15-17 seem to be ideal years for most of them. But FIG has been trying for years to encourage women to stay in the sport longer. There have been talks of increasing the age requirement to 18, but that would receive incredible backlash from the gymnastics community if they did. I don't see it realistically happening, but I know it's something Bruno Grandi has had in mind for some time. He's really in the minority opinion when it comes to that.

    Besides, you know China and North Korea have to show up with 10-year-olds to pass off as 16 icon_wink.gif
  • kikrguy

    Posts: 1

    Oct 15, 2012 1:44 AM GMT
    I agree with you concerning NBC, their coverage, Elfie Schlagel and Tim Daggett. Their oversimplifications concerning the differences in scoring never fails to amaze me. While landings are important, to listen to them they are all that matter. With the new scoring system, its confusing enough without making it seem one-dimensional.

    I was a gymnast when I was younger, and I've been following the sport since I was involved (I was one of the ones inspired my Nadia Comaneci) and the only coverage I've thought were good were the year when NBC had the three channels (Red, White & Blue) and they showed every routine by every athlete. They lost tons of money, so they didn't do it again, but it was great seeing all the routines.