FILL IN THE BLANK: I'm so old that when I was a child _____________________

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    Aug 08, 2012 1:42 AM GMT
    Candy bars were 5 cents.........small tho'.

    "The Edge of Night" came on CBS weekdays at 4PM-----"presented live!"--- and scared the hell of good little boys and girls who had to sit with Grandma and watch it.


    I am gonna start a new topic: What is with all these silly "the-guy-above-you-is...." topics on here, some circulating for years? why why why?
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    Aug 08, 2012 1:42 AM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidTV was still Black & white icon_eek.gif


    The republican party wasn't ruined yet icon_smile.gif
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 24064

    Aug 08, 2012 1:43 AM GMT
    msuNtx said
    CuriousJockAZ saidTV was still Black & white icon_eek.gif


    The republican party wasn't ruined yet icon_smile.gif


    Well, Kennedy was President LOL
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    Aug 08, 2012 1:44 AM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    msuNtx said
    CuriousJockAZ saidTV was still Black & white icon_eek.gif


    The republican party wasn't ruined yet icon_smile.gif


    Well, Kennedy was President LOL


    There was a reason he was in Dallas, TX that day and it wasn't because he was popular.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 24064

    Aug 08, 2012 1:45 AM GMT
    wesbjack said
    "The Edge of Night" came on CBS weekdays at 4PM



    Didn't "Dark Shadows" come on right after that? I remember running home from school every day to see Barnabus Collins.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 24064

    Aug 08, 2012 1:46 AM GMT
    msuNtx said
    There was a reason he was in Dallas, TX that day and it wasn't because he was popular.



    No doubt Karl Rove had his fingers in that too icon_lol.gif
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    Aug 08, 2012 1:46 AM GMT
    A.O.L was $4 per hour!
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    Aug 08, 2012 1:49 AM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    msuNtx said
    There was a reason he was in Dallas, TX that day and it wasn't because he was popular.



    No doubt Karl Rove had his fingers in that too icon_lol.gif


    Wouldn't shock me. He is probably the worst person ever affiliated in politics.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13999

    Aug 08, 2012 1:49 AM GMT
    I used to dig clay out of the creek that ran along side the property, make stuff and let it dry in the sun.

    My brothers would smash them.
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    Aug 08, 2012 1:53 AM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    wesbjack said
    "The Edge of Night" came on CBS weekdays at 4PM



    Didn't "Dark Shadows" come on right after that? I remember running home from school every day to see Barnabus Collins.


    That was 10 yrs later and a different network, young man......
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    Aug 08, 2012 1:55 AM GMT
    Calculators were called slide rules, gas was 39¢ a gallon and no one was using pesticides to get rid of the Beetles!
  • BuggEyedSprit...

    Posts: 936

    Aug 08, 2012 1:56 AM GMT
    The convertibles that made their way across the country were know as Conestogas...

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    Aug 08, 2012 1:59 AM GMT
    eb925guy saidCalculators were called slide rules, gas was 39¢ a gallon and no one was using pesticides to get rid of the Beetles!


    Are you kidding? Back then there were REAL pesticides that would knock down every bug in the orchard. I used to ride on the backboard of the pull-sprayer while great-grandad nuked everything. And it hasn't *twitch* affected me *twitch* at all!
  • upsguy68

    Posts: 270

    Aug 08, 2012 1:59 AM GMT
    All sodas came in GLASS BOTTLESicon_surprised.gif
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    Aug 08, 2012 2:01 AM GMT
    . . . we were not charged for 3-D glasses at the movies!
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    Aug 08, 2012 2:20 AM GMT
    I'm so old that when I was a young man I could.......

    Fill my car's gas tank from empty for less that $3.00 USD, and have my engine oil, water and tire pressure checked for free, by a station attendant in a uniform who also pumped the gas. I never stepped out of my car.

    Fill 5 brown paper bags full of groceries for less than $20, and receive S&H Green Stamps as well.

    Get an ice cream sundae at the drug store soda counter for 20, so big I could barely finish it.

    I remember making a local pay call for a nickel, later a dime, from a wooden phone booth that had a 2-piece phone, with a separate earpiece you held, and a hinged mouthpiece that was attached to the box. Now I have an iPhone 4S 5S. WOW!

    27771942.jpg
  • booboolv

    Posts: 203

    Aug 08, 2012 2:24 AM GMT
    Lead made paint colors more vibrant
    Asbestos was a common part of buildings.
    My family had the first color TV on the block. Made us very popular for a while. It took 4 big men (I wasn't very big, so the men seemed like they were) to move the Color Console Magnavox from the truck to the living room.
    There was a TV channel that played music and turned from one clock to another showing the time all around the world.
    When I started driving gas was $0.66/gallon.
    Seat belts, insurance, motorcycle helmets all were optional.
    Cell phones were something Captain Kirk used.

    Thanks, guys for showing up and sharing with the younger guys just what life was like back when we WERE the remote controls and the antenna boosters.
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Aug 08, 2012 2:41 AM GMT
    Krankheit saidWe had air raid drills in school because somebody thought that hiding under our desks would save our lives if the Russians attacked with nuclear weapons.


    I remember that.....

    I'm so old that when I was a child, everything was "segregated" in Birmingham, Alabama: water fountains, entrances to public buildings, George Wallace was Governor and my elementary school was 100 percent white.
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    Aug 08, 2012 2:42 AM GMT
    booboolv saidWhen I started driving gas was $0.66/gallon.
    Seat belts, insurance, motorcycle helmets all were optional.

    Gas was as low as 19 a gallon for "regular". I was shocked when "high-test" (premium) went above 30.

    When I started driving, cars didn't have seat belts, but I paid extra to have lap belts installed. The 3-point shoulder belts hadn't been introduced yet, a later Volvo invention they didn't patent. Nor did the lap belts have retractors, they were loose like airplane seat belts, and with a similar latch mechanism that you manually adjusted for tightness.
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    Aug 08, 2012 2:57 AM GMT
    Only rich people had 60 inch RCA TVs!

    6nwj9v.jpg
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    Aug 08, 2012 3:00 AM GMT
    we actually played outside!!
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    Aug 08, 2012 3:01 AM GMT
    turtleneckjock said
    Krankheit saidWe had air raid drills in school because somebody thought that hiding under our desks would save our lives if the Russians attacked with nuclear weapons.

    I remember that......

    I remember the coast-to-coast national air raids drills in the 1950s. Everyone had to get off the streets and seek shelter, leave your car at the curb and get indoors when the sirens sounded. Sci-fi films from that era used shots of US cities with scenes of empty streets and abandoned vehicles, that suited their plots of alien invaders and atomically-mutated monsters destroying all life.

    As for hiding under school desks, the idea was to avoid radiation burns, and falling ceiling debris. It was understood that if you were close to the blast you'd be vaporized, no desk would save you. The hope was that you would be far enough away that building damage would be survivable, much like the response to an earthquake, and you'd be shielded from direct radiation entering through windows, which even a desk could block.

    This was what us kids were taught in the early 1950s, and it was indeed scary for many. I remember being herded into basement school rooms during these air raid drills, and hearing mostly girls screaming in terror. And being annoyed at them, since we all knew it was a drill, like our monthly fire drills. They'd be yelling that bombs were gonna kill us, and I'd be like, shut up girl, this is just an exercise. But I do wonder if a whole generation was traumatized by these things.
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Aug 08, 2012 3:06 AM GMT
    Here's another one from my Birmingham days that will make your jaws drop:

    Sure, there were only three television networks back in the 60's (NBC, CBS and ABC). Birmingham had only TWO TV stations! WBRC was the ABC affiliate and WAPI had programming from both NBC and CBS.

    Needless to say, there was some good NBC and CBS programming that was never seen in that city......
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Aug 08, 2012 3:08 AM GMT
    Boris saidOnly rich people had 60 inch RCA TVs!

    6nwj9v.jpg



    Oh yeah? Back in the day, rich people had these...and it was a treat if it was a "color TV."

    RCA-CTC162-ColorTV.JPG
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    Aug 08, 2012 3:22 AM GMT
    turtleneckjock saidOh yeah? Back in the day, rich people had these...and it was a treat if it was a "color TV."

    RCA-CTC162-ColorTV.JPG

    We got our first TV in 1949, a "large-screen" 16" model. But we avoided color when it came along in the mid-50s because it was so bad, and so difficult to adjust, with a shit-load of controls to adjust.

    I never saw a decent color TV in those years, and my Father, who loved baseball, always bitched about watching games with his friends, since the grass was blue instead of green. And CBS didn't broadcast any color, because they had a feud with NBC/RCA over their patent rights to the color standard the FCC had adopted.

    I finally bought my parents a color TV in 1972 (I already had my own), because by then the color control was mostly automatic, nothing they had to fiddle with.