A question for second language speakers...

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    Aug 28, 2012 7:39 AM GMT
    Cole0505 saidwhen I speak german my voice drops in Pitch and it's already quite deep as it is icon_neutral.gif

    If I am speaking swiss-german I am incredibly informal
    If I am speaking High-german I am incredibly polite a lot of the time
    I am also quite blunt when I speak either German.


    I have a similar drop in pitch when I speak Afrikaans. And also when I try out german a bit. It's the way the language is constructed, the word formation and feel.

    Hehe. My Afrikaans is more polite when Im having a serious conversation but changes to informal when I wamna crack a joke or something. But I love how I can express myself so much better using Afrikaans to just saying it in english.

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    Aug 28, 2012 7:48 AM GMT
    I don`t change much when I speak Mandarin, English and French, I make ridiculous jokes in all three languages and make ppl laugh with me or laugh at me.

    I do use very different culture reference in all three languages and I am slightly more smart ass in 2 of them so I guess it`s really how well do you know your languages.

    BTW. I heard 70% of communication is body language so that might help to bring the variations down, unless of course you panic when you don`t speak the language fluently.
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    Aug 28, 2012 7:55 AM GMT
    My speech impediments come out when I speak English, and I curse like a sailor. I am usually much more polite and formal when I speak Cantonese. Usually it is because I am speaking to friends' parents though.
  • drypin

    Posts: 1798

    Aug 28, 2012 8:49 AM GMT
    It IS an interesting phenomenon. We looked at language identities at university. The fact is that it has taken 13 years for me to stop being "soft-spoken" in German, as if a maturing process was running simultaneously alongside my own growth. In Spanish I'm rather butch, though I haven't used it in so long that I'm not sure that would still be the case. We were in France last week, and I notice that my French is just like in English - I tend to bring over the same intonations and pausing patterns. Italian is a language that's so much fun to speak, it's hard NOT to be louder and more flamboyant with hand and facial gestures. They do it, so it doesn't seem inappropriate!
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    Aug 28, 2012 9:16 AM GMT
    Well I am Mexican guy in Germany, basically i speak, Spanish, German and English everyday, but I have noticed it is not the personality which changes, but more how deep the knowledge i have of the languages, and how we can express or ideas. I have been adapting german words while i am speaking either english or spanish, and the other way around too (specially if i am speaking with people who is able to speak the 3 languages too) cause those words have a stronger meaning in a specific language.
    But i would say I am exactly the same person in each language, just that i cannot express my self in english and german like i do in spanisch, obvious reasons.

  • Buddha

    Posts: 1822

    Aug 28, 2012 10:23 AM GMT
    Well as you can tell from my looks, my first language isn't English. It's Swedish (trolololo, c wat i did thar). Not sure if my personality changes so much, since I've been speaking English for such a long time it comes to a me a bit more naturally, so I mostly change "personality" depending on the person I'm talking to.
  • danielvn

    Posts: 222

    Aug 28, 2012 10:52 AM GMT
    I make more lame jokes when I speak Vietnamese. Tend to talk more too. also with a higher pitch. I switch to a quite deeper voice when I speak English. Back then I didnt feel very comfortable cursing in English but now I can curse in both English and Vietnamese lol
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    Aug 28, 2012 12:56 PM GMT
    Thats actually a really good question, I've been thinking about it as well and I've noticed I'm more straight when I'm speaking Russian icon_rolleyes.gif which is my first language.
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    Aug 30, 2012 12:05 PM GMT
    i tend to be more sluttish in the English context and less in the Chinese context.
  • alphatop

    Posts: 1955

    Aug 30, 2012 6:29 PM GMT
    My mother tongue is Serbo-Croatian, and my second language is English. I can also speak Spanish and mandarin Chinese, as well as Russian and Gypsy language. It feels like multiple personality disorder, because each language brings yet another part of my character. I love to switch from one language to another. And it's not just about the language, it's about culture and customs as well.icon_cool.gif
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    Aug 30, 2012 6:32 PM GMT
    haha when i speak german its like i can say anything and it doesnt really matter....oops! one thing that is difficult is to put emotion into the language
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    Aug 30, 2012 6:33 PM GMT
    No.
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    Aug 30, 2012 6:35 PM GMT
    notwendig72 saidhaha when i speak german its like i can say anything and it doesnt really matter....oops! one thing that is difficult is to put emotion into the language


    ohhh you should make a nude video speaking German so we can see how you express yourself
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    Aug 30, 2012 6:37 PM GMT
    When I speak english which is my second language pitch is higher and spanish I sound more masculine
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    Aug 30, 2012 6:38 PM GMT
    my native language is hillbilly.
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    Aug 30, 2012 6:40 PM GMT
    I've been speaking Irish (Gaelic) and Welsh before English, and certainly with Irish and to a lesser extent Welsh, I use a lot less words to convey the same thing than I would in English. Also Irish and Welsh aren't really tonal languages, but because they are very verbal, not literal like English, they tend to carry a lot more emotion which leads to a louder volume than English.
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    Aug 30, 2012 6:43 PM GMT
    Ej101 saidWhen I speak english which is my second language pitch is higher and spanish I sound more masculine


    Spanish is definitely higher pitch than English, I lived in Galway which gets a ton of Spanish tourists and experienced this firsthand.
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    Sep 12, 2012 7:28 PM GMT
    Multi lingual here, and yeah i do feel the same, especially when i speak Dutch i tend to be a lot more serious and use more formal language but when i am speaking spanish or papiamentu i tend to be more relaxed about the formality
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    Jun 29, 2013 3:03 PM GMT
    NO,,, i feel like I'm always the same. But I have noticed others change in demeanor
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    Jun 29, 2013 3:12 PM GMT
    In my native language, Hindi, I am more relaxed and calm while speaking.Tone wise it's also softer than other languages I speak.

    Speaking English as second language can be tiring and I think I speak it a bit louder than my native language.

    Spanish on the other hand is spoken in high pitch, so I go a bit above my English tone to speak Spanish. I still can't make jokes naturally in Spanish. icon_cry.gif

    Just started learning Dutch, my throat is getting used to their g sound.
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    Jun 29, 2013 3:14 PM GMT
    I've been using English as a second language for over 20 years now... yes, I do change a bit. Brazilian Portuguese makes use of diminutive suffixes that convey a very idiomatic sense of cuteness. On the other hand English has phrasal verbs that make the language sound more "sharp" and less rigid to me. In English you can either say "The storm is closing in" or "The tempest is approaching", whereas in Portuguese you only have the latter's Latinate form "A tempestade está se aproximando" / The tempest is approaching.
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    Jun 29, 2013 3:15 PM GMT
    English, French, Japanese, Sign and Spanish are my languages.
    I speak in a higher pitch in Spanish and Japanese.

    Normal voice in French and English.
    Sign, I overreact every single movement.
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    Jun 29, 2013 3:29 PM GMT
    Yes it happens because to me all the time. When I speak English, my intonation is very different to the other languages I speak esp. Punjabi because I speak Punjabi at a much faster rate.
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1344

    Jun 29, 2013 3:32 PM GMT
    Excellent topic! being fluently bilingual in both English and Spanish, I am finding it more and more difficult to be understood by anyone who only speaks one language! why? because there are phrases or ways of expressing a feeling, that to me feels more passionate and real in either of the two languages. That is why I much prefer a partner or friends that are equally fluent in both English and Spanish!! being multilingual is the way of the future! anyone who refuses to learn more then one language are at a huge disadvantage!
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    Jun 29, 2013 4:16 PM GMT
    My parents first language is French, but i grew up speaking French and Australian and then learn Spanish during high school and college ... I have been told many times that i speak Spanish with more of a French than with an Australian accent , and i think it comes from the fact that French and Spanish are very similar in wordings .