Bad Grammar!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    TennisJock10 saidDoes this bother anyone else as much as it bothers me?!?! I can't tell you how many times someone messages me saying "sup" or "wassup" or "wats good."

    It makes me want to beat you with a dictionary! It makes my skin crawl. Why is it so hard for people to speak/write correctly? Am I overreacting?

    Does anyone else feel the same?


    I get those messages more often than I like...

    *my reaction when I read them*
    213ezj7.gif

    Then I just ignore it...I may respond depending on my mood lol
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidMy grammar was as bad as could be.
    She spent the last 30 years of her life in and out of the Big House. Grand theft auto, bad checks, mail fraud, scams of various kinds, and various drug charges.

    We used to go up to the prison every other Sunday to see her.


    she was a whale of shark i heard
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3762

    Oct 18, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    redacting said
    tturner2099 said
    eagermuscle said
    Bad grammar, limited vocabulary and poor elocution skills?

    Serial comma.


    Also known as the "Oxford" comma. The ESL text book I am required to use here teaches no comma before the last item in a list. I pull out my hair. I don't circle it as a mistake if the kids write one.

    376608_10150354241510448_600185447_86253
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:41 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidMy grammar was as bad as could be.
    She spent the last 30 years of her life in and out of the Big House. Grand theft auto, bad checks, mail fraud, scams of various kinds, and various drug charges.

    We used to go up to the prison every other Sunday to see her.

    How'd ya like your grammar's pudding?
  • Soldier_Medic

    Posts: 20

    Oct 18, 2012 4:43 AM GMT
    Did you mean poor grammar lol? It bothers me as well.
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:43 AM GMT
    stop_clubbing_baby_seals.jpg
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:44 AM GMT
    NormalGuy93 said
    redacting said
    tturner2099 said
    eagermuscle said
    Bad grammar, limited vocabulary and poor elocution skills?

    Serial comma.


    Also known as the "Oxford" comma. The ESL text book I am required to use here teaches no comma before the last item in a list. I pull out my hair. I don't circle it as a mistake if the kids write one.

    376608_10150354241510448_600185447_86253

    This pleasantly gives double meanings to well meaning reading Americans who read my posts.
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:44 AM GMT
    Trollileo said
    calibro said
    Trollileo said
    TennisJock10 saidI blame all those years of AP lit and my current professors haha. It is definitely a pet peeve of mine.
    It was the 4th grade for me. I've been a grammar slut since I was 9.


    then stylistically you should know it's not conventional to write out numbers (in their arabic forms) unless they're long or part of an address or time.
    This is coming from the person whom I have only seen capitalize his sentences once? Besides, when I was a journalist I never got to use numbers so it's nice to see digits for once.


    that's because those arabic numerals are disgusting
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:44 AM GMT
    calibro saidstop_clubbing_baby_seals.jpg
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    Oct 18, 2012 5:16 AM GMT
    I haven't studied this stuff in a loooong time. But this sounds right on numbers:

    http://www.ehow.com/how_2323422_format-numbers-associated-press-style.html

    "The general rule regarding numbers in Associated Press style is to spell out one to nine and use figures for numbers 10 and above.

    Addresses – Use figures for the address number: 7 Maple Drive. For street names with ordinal numbers, follow the general rule: spell out “first” through “ninth” and use figures for “tenth” and higher: 8 Third Ave., 18 32nd St., etc.

    Ages – Figures are always used when giving the age of a person or animal, but follow the general rule for inanimate objects. The girl was 9 years old. The 3-year-old boy likes to swim. The dog, 6, ate the newspaper. My desk is two years old.
    "

    But also, obviously, never begin a sentence with numerals not spelled out regardless of their length, or just bury the damned thing in the sentence.
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    Oct 18, 2012 5:19 AM GMT
    oh my god calibro you can't just tell an arabic numeral it's disgusting
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    Oct 18, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    I think I have the worst English grammar skills and my English pronunciation is even worse. I have a heavy accent I can't get rid off. A friend of mine say it sounds like Russian or something very annoying. lol
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    Oct 18, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    on wednesdays we wear arabic numerals
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    Oct 18, 2012 6:20 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidMy grammar was as bad as could be.
    She spent the last 30 years of her life in and out of the Big House. Grand theft auto, bad checks, mail fraud, scams of various kinds, and various drug charges.

    We used to go up to the prison every other Sunday to see her.

    "O grammar," crater ladle gull, "wart bag icer gut! A nervous sausage bag ice!"
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    Oct 18, 2012 1:15 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    calibro said
    Trollileo said
    calibro said
    Trollileo said
    TennisJock10 saidI blame all those years of AP lit and my current professors haha. It is definitely a pet peeve of mine.
    It was the 4th grade for me. I've been a grammar slut since I was 9.


    then stylistically you should know it's not conventional to write out numbers (in their arabic forms) unless they're long or part of an address or time.
    This is coming from the person whom I have only seen capitalize his sentences once? Besides, when I was a journalist I never got to use numbers so it's nice to see digits for once.


    that's because those arabic numerals are disgusting
    tumblr_mbr8xw8oTo1rwlfseo1_500.gif


    whatever bitches, you can just walk to the library
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Oct 18, 2012 1:45 PM GMT
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    Oct 18, 2012 2:53 PM GMT
    Not as much as multiple punctuation marks--for example:

    "Does this bother anyone else as much as it bothers me?!?!"
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    Oct 18, 2012 2:56 PM GMT
    DOMINUS saidNot as much as multiple punctuation marks--for example:

    "Does this bother anyone else as much as it bothers me?!?!"


    Not personally.

    I love to play with grammar. Not where the meaning/message is demeaned and corrosively distorted though, as that really irks me.

    Yet, using the structured system of standardised grammar, playing with it, bending rules, creating a novel medium of expression; now, that kinda excites me icon_cool.gif
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    Oct 18, 2012 2:56 PM GMT
    It doesn't bother me when it's a simple greeting, it's only if that person continues to respond with awful sentence structure. These people tend to be the ones looking for a dick pic anyway.
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    Oct 18, 2012 3:11 PM GMT
    There was this one guy in Real Jock that told me to stop writing in the forum because of my poor English and bad grammar. He claim that my poor English is affecting his brains and request that I be banned from Real Jock . Another fellow say that I must be drunk or intoxicated while writing. .

    But most people here understand that I am not an English speaker (I speak 3 other language )thus are not expected to write perfect English . Probably you should just ignore , us not native English speaker . After all , nobody is forcing you to read/do anything you dont want to.

    The reason why Real Jock is so intresting is because there are all kind and variety of people in here. Life get more interesting when we are more open to people of different race, nationalites and etc....

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    Oct 18, 2012 3:19 PM GMT
    I agree with the OP, it's very annoying. I'm not expected perfect grammar and I make my share of mistakes however, the obvious grammatical inconsistencies of your and you're, there, their and they're and the like drive me nuts.

    I always check to see if the person if someone that might not have English as their primary language though. I can't imagine trying to learn it as a second language!
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    Oct 18, 2012 3:22 PM GMT
    i dnt rely mind it cuz lyk it dosnt rely mttar on intrnet


    ;)
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    Oct 18, 2012 3:35 PM GMT
    There are also style rules that apply to special circumstances. The one with which I'm most familiar is in writing speech copy, aka orator style.

    In order to be easy to read without error from a podium or a prompter the letters are all sans-serif caps, and most words are spelled out fully without abbreviations, and numerals are not used. Modified phonetic spelling is sometimes substituted for words the reader might mispronounce. Example (omitting the typical double line spacing):

    GOOD AFTERNOON, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. I WANT TO THANK DOCTOR SMITH FOR HIS KIND INTRODUCTION, AND FOR HAVING INVITED ME TO SPEAK BEFORE YOU TODAY. I REALIZED LAST NIGHT THAT THIS IS MY TENTH VISIT TO YOUR LOVELY CAMPUS HERE AT NORTH ADAMS STREET, SINCE I FIRST VISITED HERE OVER THIRTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. I HAVE BEEN SURROUNDED BY THESE IMPRESSIVE L-S-U BANNERS SO MANY TIMES BEFORE I BEGIN TO THINK OF MYSELF AS AN AH-LUM LIKE ALL OF YOU.

    And speech copy can be modified and marked-up in any number of ways to suit the speaker, since the product isn't intended as a textual record for others, but rather as a personalized visual aid in delivering a verbal presentation.
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    Oct 18, 2012 3:38 PM GMT
    I look at "Wassup" and "sup" as dialect. They're just like the bits of cockney, etc. that someone like Dickens might use.

    What bugs me is bad grammar when it either ignores simple rules ("He did good" "I'm going to lay down" "between you and I") or simply defies logic: "everyone should express their opinion".

    And what's with split infinitives? "to slowly drive down the street." "To slowly?"

    Language is am imprecise tool at best. Use it carelessly and it looses even more meaning. Poor grammar is a sign of poor thinking, and if words can mean anything, they mean nothing. Who can take seriously people who post opinions on a discussion board that are larded with bad grammar and spelling? We're having a war on the Seattle Times boards with the anti-marriage equality crowd, and it always seems like the religiously challenged types have the worst grammar and spelling. Why listen to someone with apparently no education?

    But all this refers to formal writing.

    Typos, however... icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 18, 2012 4:04 PM GMT
    IMAGE HTTP ADDRESS GOES HEREIt's okay that these kinds of things bother people, but saying people should or shouldn't say certain things is called prescriptivism (prescribing what ought to be said and how). As a linguist, I instead take a descriptivist view (describing what is said). Would you tell someone speaking Jamaican Creole English, for example, that they don't speak English just because it sounds different from how you speak when he/she identifies as a speaker of English? Maybe someone has a different socio-economic background as you and couldn't afford to go to school and thus speaks differently. As long as you know the meaning of what he or she is trying to say, you're both speaking English. Languages are ever-evolving and it's something we can't prevent. Our language is different from our parents' and ours will be different than the next generations'. Of course different situations call for different registers of language, but, especially on a forum such as this, it shouldn't really matter in the end (even if I catch myself correcting them in my head).

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