Who do you trust? Where do you get your news?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 24, 2008 1:03 PM GMT
    sxypalestinian saidBBC, Euronews, Link tv Mosaic News, and Al-Jazeera News.



    Ditto.

    Been watching Al Jazeera News for several months now and have never been exposed to a more balanced and unbiased news source. Even, good ole reliable BBC seems to have become a tool for American interests of late.
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    Nov 24, 2008 6:06 PM GMT
    I like the Economist, and the WSJ. I read the NY Times, often cringing at it's complete lack of integrity, not to mention all the problems with its local coverage. For TV, I do like the PBS newshour, don't care much for any cable news channels -- I mean the bar is set so low, sensationalism rules the day, so it's irrelevant whether CNN is worse than FBN; they both suck!

    Many have praised the BBC, which I also watch, but without much enthusiasm. On the plus side they have a reporter EVERYWHERE, so if there's an earthquake in some remote area, they are usually first on the scene. However, they are goverment run, which puts doubt in my mind about their credibility and independance.(There was a scandal over their Iraq war coverage not long ago.) Also, they have a fairly liberal slant in general -- that Katy Kay sounds like she never met a goverment program she didn't like and when she mentions George Bush she sounds pissy.

    At one one point in the distant past, wasn't journalism supposed to be free of opinion?
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    Nov 24, 2008 7:07 PM GMT
    sxypalestinian saidBBC, Euronews, Link tv Mosaic News, and Al-Jazeera News.

    I don't trust American news that control by the biggest Zionist lobby AIPAC.


    Great so you watch terrorist news. Good for you. Let's try to take down the Israeli monster while we're living in another country that completely wiped out a group of people (natives) up to yes...60 years ago.

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    Nov 24, 2008 7:09 PM GMT
    Since I watch everything on TV with more of a jaundiced eye, lately the New York Times is the source I trust the most.
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    Nov 24, 2008 7:13 PM GMT
    I ALWAYS question news stories I hear and read in the news! I don't trust the press, for the most part, and question their practices and spin for delivering stories. Whether the news is some complex piece (like the current financial crisis) or a simple local do-good story, I still feel the press makes anything they report on for their benefit more so than telling us objectively what is truly going on.
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    Nov 24, 2008 7:14 PM GMT
    dancerjack saiddoubt everything


    and trust no one! icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 24, 2008 7:17 PM GMT
    I like The Economist, and Slate. I also tend to read a large number of op/ed columns from a range of political perspectives. Honestly, I think the area in which most journalists' political bias asserts itself is less in how they cover a particular topic, but rather in what topic they choose to cover.
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    Nov 24, 2008 7:24 PM GMT
    What I watch on my iphone daily ....during the week.
    Democracy Now! with Amy Goodman (http://www.democracynow.org/about) - Democracy Now! is funded entirely through contributions from listeners, viewers, and foundations. Which helps it to be more independent. I do recognize that it very left leaning at times, but it's the only news source that will actually interview leaders/politicians from around the world that are considered far too "controversial" for mainstream media.
    and
    Mosaic - (http://www.linktv.org/mosaic) The Peabody Award-winning Mosaic features selections from daily TV news programs produced by national broadcasters throughout the Middle East, translated when necessary into English. I highly suggest Mosaic for those wanting to REALLY know what is going on. What is great about this program is that it shows the same or similar stories told by various news programs in the Middle East, including Israel. So you see the bias from each news source but at least you get it from the "horses mouth" so to speak. I find this telecast very resourceful when dealing with the daily domestic issues of various Middle Eastern countries.

    Weekends:
    BBC news and Planet Green (http://planetgreen.discovery.com/) to get a sense of some of the cutting edge Green technology that is being discussed and realized at the present moment.
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    Nov 24, 2008 8:02 PM GMT
    I trust BBC the most, and get a good deal of news from their website (God bless widgets). That said, the entirety of American University is glued to CNN, so I absorb most of my news through open doorways and Andersen Cooper.

    I think podcasts are an excellent source of news. You can download as many as you want (for free) and really evaluate the news on your own time, whenever you want, however you want. I subscribe to the big news networks (NBC, ABC, etc.) and also smaller, independent sources.

    One of the most exciting things about the future of podcasting is Barack Obama's commitment to an open dialogue with the American people. He's already posting weekly videos on YouTube, iTunes, etc. You know he's got people scouring video comments -- I think we're finally going to be able to actually talk to our President! What an exciting time, right?
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    Nov 26, 2008 6:09 AM GMT
    Fox keeps it real!

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    Nov 26, 2008 6:12 AM GMT
    Shep is so fuckn awesome HAHAHA!!!

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    Nov 26, 2008 6:15 AM GMT
    Jane you naughty girl icon_wink.gif

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    Nov 26, 2008 6:18 AM GMT
    BWAHAHAHA!!!

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    Nov 28, 2008 5:15 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]slapaho18 said[/cite]I don't care what people think. I love Fox. They has my fave journalists/ personalities and best of all Red Eye.





    I hope you are kidding. This is just junk. Because if you consider this News. You are surely lost.
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    Nov 30, 2008 4:49 PM GMT
    krush said[quote][cite]slapaho18 said[/cite]I don't care what people think. I love Fox. They has my fave journalists/ personalities and best of all Red Eye.





    I hope you are kidding. This is just junk. Because if you consider this News. You are surely lost.


    Uhhh clearly that RedEye clip is not news. However it makes me laugh just like this clip from RedEye HAHAHA! Btw starting a sentence with Because... Tisk tisk tisk...

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    Dec 01, 2008 8:37 AM GMT
    evilgemini said

    At one one point in the distant past, wasn't journalism supposed to be free of opinion?


    Maybe it was supposed to be (though I think that a lot of journalists would never have claimed that), but I don't think it ever was. Some journalists today may claim to be reporting with no bias, but they're not. It's not possible to do that so I wouldn't look for it or expect it. I'm not even sure it's desirable.

    We're going to trust the news sources that generally tend to confirm what we believe. For me, that's The Daily Show and, in spite of its problems, The New York Times. I watch The News Hour, I like watching Washington Week in Review, NOW and Bill Moyers Journal. I watch CNN a lot, not because I especially trust it but because it reaches a lot of people who are in the middle politically and I want to know what they're hearing.

    I admit that I can't follow international affairs as closely as I probably should. It's too complicated, it's too much for me to take it all in and try to understand it. Trying to understand and follow what's going on in the United States is difficult enough.
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    Dec 01, 2008 9:16 AM GMT
    slapaho18 said

    Btw starting a sentence with Because... Tisk tisk tisk...



    From The American Heritage Dictionary:

    A favorite rule of schoolteachers (but curiously absent from the tradition of usage commentary) is that a sentence must not begin with because. Sometimes, however, because is perfectly appropriate as the opening word of a sentence, as in the beginning of one of Emily Dickinson's best-known poems: "Because I could not stop for Death—/He kindly stopped for me." In fact, sentences beginning with because are quite common in written English.
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    Dec 01, 2008 9:20 AM GMT
    I get my news while getting lost in sexy Anderson Cooper's eyes.
    or laugh while reading Perez HIlton
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    Dec 01, 2008 10:03 AM GMT
    theatrengym said
    slapaho18 said

    Btw starting a sentence with Because... Tisk tisk tisk...



    From The American Heritage Dictionary:

    A favorite rule of schoolteachers (but curiously absent from the tradition of usage commentary) is that a sentence must not begin with because. Sometimes, however, because is perfectly appropriate as the opening word of a sentence, as in the beginning of one of Emily Dickinson's best-known poems: "Because I could not stop for Death—/He kindly stopped for me." In fact, sentences beginning with because are quite common in written English.


    Crack is quite common in the ghetto but that don't make it righticon_twisted.gif
  • NickoftheNort...

    Posts: 1416

    Dec 01, 2008 10:32 AM GMT
    I get my news primarily from the Norwegian Aftenposten ("Evening Post"), the International Herald Tribune, and the Miami Herald. I also tune in to Glenn Greenwald and Andrew Sullivan for interpretation of news not otherwise mentioned or discussed.

    My ideal form of news is to read good, primarily fact-based books (while aware of relevant narrative and constructive theories) and then compare the possibly factual elements of news reports with the information in the books.

    As for trusting, I gague it in terms of how little I trust a particular news source and by interpreting the slant used in reporting a particular item. I do myself a favor in asking who benefits from the news report.

    ***
    One way of interpreting the Zogby poll is that viewers who watch Fox News are more likely to trust its presentation of the news than viewers who watch CNN or MSNBC are to trust their respective news sources; we end up with a group of viewers who trust their particular channel of choice versus viewers who are skeptical to their channels of choice.

    The news may be good fodder for Fox News and its adherents, but it is close to irrelevant for those who don't trust it or the other choices in the poll.

    Coarsely, I'd compare it to a hypothetical international poll finding that the Raul Castro regime is more trusted by Cubans living in Cuba than the Bush / Obama regime is trusted by USAmericans living in the USA. It's cute, potentially interesting for students looking for thesis work, but irrelevant for the rest of us.
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    Dec 01, 2008 11:52 AM GMT
    slapaho18 said

    Crack is quite common in the ghetto but that don't make it righticon_twisted.gif


    H. W. Fowler and Wilson Follett lived in the ghetto and smoked crack? Along with Emily Dickinson? I didn't know that. I learned something today. icon_biggrin.gif

    Nonetheless, on this question I'm going to trust them and contemporary commentators such as Bryan Garner and C. Edward Good, who have chosen to follow in the footsteps of Fowler and Follett by living in the ghetto and smoking crack. I do think you've got William Safire on your side.

    Now if you'd pointed out that "Because if you consider this News" was a sentence fragment, I'd have agreed. But (uh-oh!) I'd still think that krush's choice to put a period after News was effective as a sort of visual rhetorical device.

    Even the odd choice to capitalize News seemed to be making a point.