9. An AIDS free generation is “within reach”

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 08, 2014 11:04 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    sftgfop said
    tj85016 saidbe careful, it mutates too fast, there will be no cure (just like there's no cure for herpes, measles, small pox, flu, etc)

    a virus is difficult, if not impossible, to get rid of

    bacteria are relatively easy to kill, virus and fungi are not

    ...I'm sorry, but you do realize that small pox has been eradicated? (ignoring the two countries that keep reservoirs of the disease for study?)

    And that the second disease that is most likely to be eradicated is also a virus...polio?

    HIV is a retro virus. Not the same thing as those others. Do look it up.

    Back to square one for you...


    ... and clearly you didn't bother to read. "virus is difficult if not impossible to get rid of". Yet the only disease to be eradicated is a virus, and the second most likely is also a virus!

    I realize that while you were in high-school you probably had never heard of a virus...but believe it or not progress has been made.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 12:06 AM GMT
    Its not much to weigh in on considering that we eradicated Small Pox close to 35 years ago!

    Science progresses by 'standing on the shoulders' of our predecessors. In that regard science and technology grow at an exponential rate. Its part of the reason why Malthus and his theory of population demographics was flawed in the 1800's.


    The first virus to be identified was only visualized correctly in the 1950's. Every year the rate of discovery and progress is close to doubling. So personally, I do believe that there will be a cure for every disease, rather it is my generation, or the next; knowledge is less likely to be a limiting variable.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 4:09 AM GMT
    sftgfop said
    tj85016 saidbe careful, it mutates too fast, there will be no cure (just like there's no cure for herpes, measles, small pox, flu, etc)

    a virus is difficult, if not impossible, to get rid of

    bacteria are relatively easy to kill, virus and fungi are not


    ...I'm sorry, but you do realize that small pox has been eradicated? (ignoring the two countries that keep reservoirs of the disease for study?)

    And that the second disease that is most likely to be eradicated is also a virus...polio?


    it was eradicated yes, but there is still no "cure" for small pox; the vaccine lessens the severity and cidofovir helps some - most people just died from the disease
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4998

    Dec 09, 2014 4:26 AM GMT
    There are a number of viral diseases for which there are effective vaccines, including smallpox and polio, but there are others for which science is still struggling to find an effective vaccine. The same is true for bacterial diseases.

    We can hope that an effective vaccine will be found for HIV, but it would be unwise to count on it. There is enough trouble keeping up with mutating influenza viri; that could also be a problem with HIV.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 4:33 AM GMT
    rna%20virus%20mutation%20rates.jpg




    zh_graph_1c.png
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 12:58 PM GMT
    I'm sorry; do you want to talk about disease eradication, or rate of mutation? A little confused about why you posted the graphs.

    Obviously mutation is a difficult thing, and one of the reasons why I think PrEP should be used sparingly (34/7/365 pill....not such a good idea in my head). But that's why you focus on the specifics of the disease. There will always be a highly conserved region that is essential for its function that it can't mutate, or readily change. Like how it enters the cell, or the basics of its capsid protein construction.

    We have vaccines for the flu, they are even close to releasing a vaccine for this Ebola strain! So I don't fully understand the point of the graph?

    ----------------

    But I certainly think there will be cures of those diseases too.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 1:36 PM GMT
    I think vaccines, especially for viruses, are usually the best way to eradicate a disease. (cost/effective)

    That being said, a lot of work is going on to better understand the chemical pathways in viruses and what causes certain viruses to go into a dormancy stage (HIV/Herpes/Chickenpox), and how to activate them.

    It was why there was that attempt earlier of the newborn infant who was born HIV+, and was given a PrEP dose to see if they could eliminate the disease. They didn't succeed, as reservoirs had already been created, but it is fascinating. If you can force a disease to 'activate and show itself' it makes a much easier disease to fight and 'cure'.

    Of course there is also the example of the first 'gene therapy' drug being released in Europe this year. So we will see if it is as effective as its trials showed. That's a pretty amazing idea as it opens up doors of not just fighting pathogens, but fixing internal problems inside of us (like Parkinsons, or certain cancers).
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4998

    Dec 09, 2014 7:16 PM GMT
    sftgfop saidI'm sorry; do you want to talk about disease eradication, or rate of mutation? A little confused about why you posted the graphs.

    Obviously mutation is a difficult thing, and one of the reasons why I think PrEP should be used sparingly (34/7/365 pill....not such a good idea in my head). But that's why you focus on the specifics of the disease. There will always be a highly conserved region that is essential for its function that it can't mutate, or readily change. Like how it enters the cell, or the basics of its capsid protein construction.

    We have vaccines for the flu, they are even close to releasing a vaccine for this Ebola strain! So I don't fully understand the point of the graph?

    ----------------

    But I certainly think there will be cures of those diseases too.


    The difficulty of finding effective vaccines is influenced by the mutation rate. Of course not everyone would be interested in the graphs, and that's OK, but there are guys here who are interested in such things which is an adequate reason to post them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 7:20 PM GMT
    sftgfop said
    Art_Deco said
    HIV is a retro virus. Not the same thing as those others. Do look it up.

    Back to square one for you...

    ... and clearly you didn't bother to read. "virus is difficult if not impossible to get rid of". Yet the only disease to be eradicated is a virus, and the second most likely is also a virus!

    I realize that while you were in high-school you probably had never heard of a virus...but believe it or not progress has been made.

    Was that a retro virus, like HIV?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 7:26 PM GMT
    No, actually the first virus identified, and described was Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    It is one of the most stable viruses in the world! Literally you can find this virus in the cigarette/cigar ash.

    Which is impressive, think about it being: harvested, processed, subjected to tons of chemicals, and then burned...and it is still viable to infect new tobacco plants.

    Luckily most viruses aren't this durable.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 7:37 PM GMT
    --> Fre0

    Mutation rates are important for understanding drug resistance, and yes they do impact vaccines, but I'm not sure that these graphs correctly reflect that information.

    Creating a useful vaccine is pretty much walking a line between using a highly conserved region of the pathogen/and making sure that enough markers are present to induce immunity.

    The problem I have with those graphs are they are doing broad mutation information; not necessarily information pertinent to host recognition.

    Like creating the flu vaccine is relatively easy. The challenge is predicting the right strain pattern, and making sure that immunity will be induced. Its why for example this years flu vaccine isn't as good. Its pretty much a 'flu weather prediction'. There are lots of HIV strains out there, so trying to create a vaccine that is effect against all of them...is the challenge! (vs. the Flu where everyone is pretty much infected by the same strains)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 7:51 PM GMT
    Here is where the graphs came from, so you can read it for yourselves...they do a decent job of simplifying the info.

    http://operonlabs.com/


    HIV is actually fairly similar to Ebola in that they are both newly emerging viruses. In that regard it is very difficult to tell our impacts on mutation rates...and how much this rapid mutation is movement into a new host (us, humans). Historically...we are fairly confident that 100 years ago we did not have Ebola or HIV.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 09, 2014 7:53 PM GMT
    **I should also warn people that I study diseases for a living...so I can talk way too much about it! Makes for some very fun/awkward dinner conversations though...