It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain

  • metta

    Posts: 54472

    May 16, 2019 10:10 PM GMT
    It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain


    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2019/05/16/723693839/its-not-just-salt-sugar-fat-study-finds-ultra-processed-foods-drive-weight-gain
  • vanquishedang...

    Posts: 812

    May 17, 2019 8:38 AM GMT
    I have had a theory that they put something in the food to make you more hungry, crave more, or take something out that fills you up, like protein or fiber. When I began this new diet I am on I ate a lot, but now that I am paying attention to my intake of nutrients, I am actually consuming less.

    I am also eating less processed foods however inadvertently. My new diet is free form, but here are my goals/ limits daily

    Calories: 2600
    Protein 100< grams
    Carbs >250 grams.
    fat >67 grams.

    You need fat in your diet but I make sure they are healthy fats like olive oil. I was often deficient in protein and I suspect this is why I was always hungry. Limiting my carbs is hard and I often go a bit over, but I now make better decisions. My BMI was 24.7, I am now at about 20
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    May 17, 2019 1:15 PM GMT
    Actually my husband & I eat more “real” foods, as the article calls them, than processed food. But I think this is largely a function of our age. We make lots of things from scratch, as we were raised, not very much packaged stuff. And few snacks. I haven’t seen a bag of potato or corn chips around here in many months.

    Plus I check the labels. If it’s got too much fat, little protein, and jammed with salt & additives, I reject it. Why I started making my own beef jerky, as I related in the Food & Recipes forum. I like jerky, but the store brands are packed with additives. My own is not, meant to be eaten in a fairly short time, not have to spend months in warehouses and on store shelves.

    Nevertheless we each have a weight issue. Primarily due to our age & disabilities that limit our activity. Plus in my case the meds I must take really slow down my metabolism. Simple solution is to limit portion size, but that’s tough. I estimate I eat well under 2000 calories a day, often around 1400, and I still don’t lose enough weight. icon_sad.gif

    Yet we eat well, great meals at restaurants we know, everything fresh and unprocessed. I often just have an appetizer alone, or if I get an entree our regular servers know at least half is going home, I never finish a whole meal, they have the take-home box ready. And at home it makes 1 or even 2 more meals for me, making the cost really reasonable.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 22667

    May 23, 2019 9:40 PM GMT
    Well I am aware of one additive that has greatly contributed to the obesity epidemic in the US, that culprit is high fructose corn syrup. I try to avoid foods with that toxic additive as much as possible.
  • jocked_and_lo...

    Posts: 4873

    May 26, 2019 6:40 PM GMT
    I would not rely on consuming cooking oils as a way to get healthy sources of fat. Technically speaking, they are processed also. Even if it is "cold processed" it's not ideal.

    Yes, I do put a little oil in a nonstick pan to cook my food but that's only to facilitate the nonstick cooking process. And sometimes I'll just use a pat of butter instead.

    Superior sources of fat are found in fatty fish like salmon, tree nuts like almonds, walnuts, etc. (peanut butter is not a true nut by the way). Also, avocados are very good sources of healthy fats.

    We get too many sources of omega 6 fatty acids from our typical western diet. The goal is to increase our intake of omega 3's which are typically deficient in the average American diet. Fatty fish like salmon is the better source. Plant based sources are not as good but the next best thing. I buy flax seed meal from Costco and put that in shakes or mix it in with other nut butters, etc.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 22667

    Jun 04, 2019 7:04 PM GMT
    American_Heritage saidI would not rely on consuming cooking oils as a way to get healthy sources of fat. Technically speaking, they are processed also. Even if it is "cold processed" it's not ideal.

    Yes, I do put a little oil in a nonstick pan to cook my food but that's only to facilitate the nonstick cooking process. And sometimes I'll just use a pat of butter instead.

    Superior sources of fat are found in fatty fish like salmon, tree nuts like almonds, walnuts, etc. (peanut butter is not a true nut by the way). Also, avocados are very good sources of healthy fats.

    We get too many sources of omega 6 fatty acids from our typical western diet. The goal is to increase our intake of omega 3's which are typically deficient in the average American diet. Fatty fish like salmon is the better source. Plant based sources are not as good but the next best thing. I buy flax seed meal from Costco and put that in shakes or mix it in with other nut butters, etc.
    I use olive oil for frying fish, chicken, or grass fed beef in a pan. I have also used avocado oil but that is quite expensive. I prefer to buy olive oil from California because I want to support our own farmers. I will never use that toxic Crisco to fry anything in because that shit is almost as bad as high fructose corn syrup.