Hot Spice Killer..... PLEASE!

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    Apr 21, 2020 4:17 AM GMT
    Last summer, me and a friend bought what we thought were "sweet" peppers at the local farmers market, only to realize what looked like red jalapenos were way hot, and he's a haitian quebecor. Saved them in the freezer anyway, I added just one pepper to a chili I made recently, and found myself in slight cough and waterworks in minutes. Still sweet meaty and delicous served over rice, but my question applies to cooking in general:

    Which/what herbs or spices do you know of by experience, can kill anything way too hot for your palate?

    I don't mean bread or milk either (he's lactose intolerate).
  • JDuderrr

    Posts: 503

    Apr 21, 2020 9:50 AM GMT
    Had a similar problem when homemade baked beans turned out way to salty. After searching the internet for what kills/removes salt, turns out the answer is to make another batch without any salt whatsoever and then mix the 2 batches together to dilute. I then froze the excess for use another time. Seems like this would be the best solution to your heat problem as well.
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    Apr 21, 2020 10:08 AM GMT
    Try Mylanta. It’s a bottled liquid antacid, available off the shelf in most US stores, helps with my stomach problems. Might work with hot chilis & spices, I dunno.
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    Apr 21, 2020 11:36 AM GMT
    EDIT: Missed that you already said you served it "over rice"... my bad.

    Tomatoes and Citrus fruits can quell the capsaicin effect in the mouth. I'm not convinced that adding it to the food quiets the spice, and depending on the dish, additional tomato or lemon/citrus may ruin the flavor or texture.

    Try serving a small juice glass with V8 or Tomato Juice... a good Bloody Mary, heavier on the tomato than the vodka also helps. Used for sipping when the spice gets overwhelming. Or do orange slices as a garnish on the plate.
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    Apr 21, 2020 1:06 PM GMT
    JonSpringon said
    Try serving a small juice glass with V8 or Tomato Juice... a good Bloody Mary, heavier on the tomato than the vodka also helps. Used for sipping when the spice gets overwhelming. Or do orange slices as a garnish on the plate.

    Tomato juice, and also V8 (which I love, it’s mostly tomato juice and what I use in Bloody Marys) are both acidic. I’m not sure, but perhaps stay away from acidy things. Also acidic is anything citric, like oranges.

    On a personal note, I often now avoid pasta with a tomato paste, like a marinara. I love it, have all my life, but the price afterwards can be too much. Instead I’ll have some pasta dishes with a creamy white Alfredo sauce. More calories, but I’ll sleep better.

    Sometimes you just gotta listen to your body. What your mouth likes may not agree with the rest of you. And that changes with time. You can try fixes, band-aids, like the Mylanta I mentioned above, but ultimately you’re fighting yourself.

    BTW, I have seen a gastroenterologist. Turns out I’ve got stomach lesions/ulcers, and all kinds of digestive disorders. Manageable, nothing I can’t handle, but yeah, my body had been sending me some important messages to which I needed to listen.

    Becoming enable to eat hot and acidic foods that I formerly enjoyed was one of them. OK, diet adjustment. No big deal, life goes on. I’ve gotten to like Alfredo, or just butter alone on my pasta. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Apr 21, 2020 1:47 PM GMT
    Here are some natural options. See the article for the full details.

    https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/4-effective-remedies-to-cool-your-mouth-after-eating-spicy-food-1340250

    1. Dairy (not an option for you)
    2. Sugar or honey
    3. Starch
    4. Tomatoes and lemons
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    Apr 21, 2020 3:52 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    JonSpringon said
    Try serving a small juice glass with V8 or Tomato Juice... a good Bloody Mary, heavier on the tomato than the vodka also helps. Used for sipping when the spice gets overwhelming. Or do orange slices as a garnish on the plate.

    Tomato juice, and also V8 (which I love, it’s mostly tomato juice and what I use in Bloody Marys) are both acidic. I’m not sure, but perhaps stay away from acidy things. Also acidic is anything citric, like oranges.


    Perhaps you should try it, or at least research it, before you dismiss it with your opinions...

    https://foodal.com/knowledge/herbs-spices/turn-down-the-heat/

    Capsaicin is a basic oil... and not 'basic' as in 'trivial'... as in high pH level and very alkaline. The acidity (low pH level) in the foods I mentioned is actually a perfect balance for neutralizing the capsaicin oils. Plus, I've served V8, or Bloody Mary, and/or Oranges as a garnish on Hot Wing nights back in my dinner party hosting days. Other folks i know have used lemons and pineapple as a garnish with spicy foods. I've also balanced out the spice in their Chili by adding tomato paste, but it will alter the flavor too.

    I know whereof I speak. I would have thought that you and you guy, with your overt love of gastronomy, would have known this.
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    Apr 21, 2020 5:27 PM GMT
    JonSpringon said
    Perhaps you should try it, or at least research it, before you dismiss it with your opinions...

    I know whereof I speak. I would have thought that you and you guy, with your overt love of gastronomy, would have known this

    Not entirely my own “opinions” - what my doctors have told me. Several of whom have looked right inside me, during endoscopies (and colonoscopies, too, for that matter, but let’s not go there right now, OK?). So a little more than just my personal opinions. What I know from specialists, and my own physical experience.

    I also have mild lactose intolerance. Runs on the male side of my family. Afflicted my Father very severely, and my youngest son. Me only if I seriously pig out on milk or ice cream - so I don’t! Problem solved.

    For my boy, he had to be able to eat ice cream with his friends, like any kid, so I found that Lactaid pills took care of it. I made sure he always had some pills in his pocket, and knew to take them.

    A small accommodation, but he got to have ice cream at parties, at school, anywhere he wanted like an “ordinary” kid.

    And sure we use citrus, and tomatoes. Is he not Italian/Sicilian? A few weeks ago I squeezed a dozen lemons for him, in a lemon squeezer I bought for him, so he could use them in recipes.

    But I know my eating limits. Just as I know my drinking limits. His own Mother, who was Italian, had to give up the tomato sauce she loved, and made herself, in her 80s.

    For the same stomach problems I have. And thereafter had only butter or Alfredo with her pasta, just like I do now. Your body determines the menu, it shouldn’t be “opinions”, and isn’t in my case.

    And I don’t know about any “love of gastronomy” I have. Cooking's my husband’s passion, as it was my late partner’s, and so I’ve tried to learn about that, be enthusiastic about it. You try to please your guy, involve yourself with his interests, share them.

    But before those 2 I was content to just eat food cold out of a can, Army soldier style. I could again, and actually sometimes do.

    A few nights ago I ate cold tuna fish from a can, by myself. No mayonnaise with it, no nuttin'. Using chopsticks, BTW. One of my several eccentricities. Gastronomy, huh? Only when he’s involved.

    But let us not argue. I suspect you may misunderstand me, and perhaps me you.
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    Apr 21, 2020 5:57 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    JonSpringon said
    Perhaps you should try it, or at least research it, before you dismiss it with your opinions...

    I know whereof I speak. I would have thought that you and you guy, with your overt love of gastronomy, would have known this


    But let us not argue. I suspect you may misunderstand me, and perhaps me you.


    I think I understand you fine. I think you misunderstood Wendigo9's question. He asked "Which/what herbs or spices do you know of by experience, can kill anything way too hot for your palate?"

    You discussing your preference of alfredo vs. marinara, your gastroenterologist, your stomach lesions, or you eating tuna straight from the can with chopsticks, and dismissing my legitimate answer to his question because your stomach can't abide it all do nothing to answer his question. It just inserts and awful lot of you into a conversation.

    Which is what you do. Which is why I understand you fine.

    You presented your answer... Mylanta. I didn't dismiss it as a stomach issue curative rather than a spice-in-the-mouth flavor curative he was asking for. I let you have your say.

    Please don't waste Wendigo9's forum space debating with me further.

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    Apr 21, 2020 7:16 PM GMT
    JonSpringon said
    I let you have your say.

    Please don't waste Wendigo9's forum space debating with me further.

    You LET me have my say? Well thank you very much for that generous allowance, SIR. But Wendigo9, whom I admire, can likely manage his forum space on his own, without your help. Or your “letting” me have my say.

    Yet you’ve done me a favor, after I tried to come to some friendly agreement. Now I know with what I’m dealing.

    So no, wasting my time logically debating with someone like you, or just discussing different aspects of digestion of hot foods in this case, is the last thing I’ll do with you.

    But back on Wendigo9’s topic: other than the Mylanta I mentioned above, I can’t think I’d try anything natural other than milk & bread/crackers, or some kinda bland starch, which he has rejected.

    My husband says his Father would eat parsley to settle his stomach, but I’m dubious that would do much in this more extreme case. One could always try, I suppose.

    I still would go with the Mylanta. Keep a bottle on hand.
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    Apr 21, 2020 8:41 PM GMT
    Now talking more medically, in which I have no professional credentials, ***DISCLAIMER*** but just speaking personally, I do take a PPI (proton pump inhibiter).

    Its main purpose is to prevent acid reflux (GERD), due to excessive stomach acid production. Talk to your doctor if that will help you dealing with hot foods.

    A common medication is omeprazole, that you can get off the shelf. The typical dose is 20 mg. It can take over a day to produce any benefit (as it says on the packaging), so don’t expect instant relief.

    In my case, however, I get better within 30 minutes. Guess I’m just lucky! And I’ve been diagnosed with GERD (Gastro-esophogial reflux disease - WOW what a mouthful!). Well, I don’t care, as long as I can take something for it.

    So do ask your doctor if you're having digestive problems. Don’t listen to me, or anybody else online. But there can be a lot of easy options you can do yourself. See what your doc says! And you should be seeing him/her regularly anyway.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11643

    Apr 22, 2020 1:41 AM GMT
    Well I don't know but I've been told...

    vodka.

    Saw this on a tv show once that had people test several different thing to kill the heat.

    Maybe a sip is worth a try. Frankly, I can't stand vodka.
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    Apr 22, 2020 3:44 AM GMT
    Art_Deco and JonSpringon, break it up! This is a Food & Recipes forum, leave all negativity to the trump trolls in the "political" bs they cause.

    My intent here is neutral and comparitive, asking what kills hot spices for you? So far the suggestion of lemon did work, I used lemon pepper seasoning when I warmed up leftovers for dinner this evening, and it gave a nice zing while cutting the flame down a bit.

    I understand the concerns of higher acidics, seeing I've had reactions to mexican food before. But becuse what I added was a dry powder, it balanced out nicely to my palate, and didn't "expell" badly if you know what I mean.

    I may be just another ordinary verified member/user on here, but it would be nice to come online and not read unwanted fights in other forums.
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    Apr 22, 2020 2:10 PM GMT
    I have oft heard that something sweet kills hot spices. I don't know, have never tried it as I do like hot spicy stuff... The kinds that make your nose run and make you break out into an immediate sweat.