What Water Do You Drink? Mostly Bottled?

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    Jul 28, 2020 12:57 PM GMT
    I guess asking what water you drink could fall under the Food heading. Saw this comic in the newspaper today.

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    What’s your drinking water source? We use a Pur filter on our kitchen tap, our daily drinking & cooking source. And we always keep a supply of Dasani bottled water on hand in case of city water disruption due to a hurricane.

    You also keep some paper and plastic ware for the kitchen, in case there’s no water for washing. And for toilet flushing you fill a tub as the storm approaches, and scoop out the water with a kitchen pot.
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    Jul 28, 2020 1:53 PM GMT
    My household water supply is rain water from the roof, stored in a 15,000 gallon cistern, filtered down to 1 micron, and disinfected with UV light. For drinking water, I run it through reverse osmosis to remove mercury and other pollutants and then pass it through a mineral cartridge.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 22737

    Jul 28, 2020 2:00 PM GMT
    I buy bottled spring water from time to time but I mostly use tap water. We haven’t had any serious issues with our municipal water supply here in Buffalo.
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    Jul 28, 2020 2:51 PM GMT
    paradox said
    My household water supply is rain water from the roof, stored in a 15,000 gallon cistern, filtered down to 1 micron, and disinfected with UV light. For drinking water, I run it through reverse osmosis to remove mercury and other pollutants and then pass it through a mineral cartridge.

    When I lived in North Dakota many of the older farm houses had cisterns, but none in active modern use. Most in the basement, to minimize freezing. Some got their water from the ground water, others from manual or windmill pumps drawing on wells.

    But none had the purification that you do. Is your home rural?

    One very large, 3-story home in ND, built in the 1880s, used a large water storage tank in the attic. It held around 5000 gallons, and the timbers to support it, that ran inside the walls into the basement, were enormous. It was fed by a well that pumped into the tank, powered by an outside windmill. There’s always a good wind in flat North Dakota.

    Gravity fed a pipe system in the house, creating running water at the taps. Cold water, as I recall, but the curator of this museum told me the very idea of running water inside a house was very advanced for that time & location.

    At what level is your cistern located, I presume below ground? So it requires electric pumps to supply the water? Perhaps with an accumulator to keep the water pressure constant?
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    Aug 06, 2020 11:04 AM GMT
    Lucky We can get good quality water, from the tap.
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    Aug 06, 2020 12:00 PM GMT
    Twomen_inlove said
    Lucky We can get good quality water, from the tap.

    The water that leaves our local plant is also good quality. It’s the decades-old pipes it travels through that are the issue. Including inside this condominium building built in the 1970s.

    We recently replaced one of the bathroom faucets, about 15 years old. I was shocked at the mineral deposits inside it, and the lines to it. We’ll keep a filter on the kitchen sink faucet (though it’s also new), used for our drinking & cooking water. It also filters out a lot of the chemical additives & contaminants that water sourced in a populated area can have.

    My guy also claims it makes his coffee taste better. The coffee maker has its own replaceable charcoal filter, so with double filtering there can’t be much left but mostly pure water, with little chlorine.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 5263

    Aug 06, 2020 8:45 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Twomen_inlove said
    Lucky We can get good quality water, from the tap.

    The water that leaves our local plant is also good quality. It’s the decades-old pipes it travels through that are the issue. Including inside this condominium building built in the 1970s.

    We recently replaced one of the bathroom faucets, about 15 years old. I was shocked at the mineral deposits inside it, and the lines to it. We’ll keep a filter on the kitchen sink faucet (though it’s also new), used for our drinking & cooking water. It also filters out a lot of the chemical additives & contaminants that water sourced in a populated area can have.

    My guy also claims it makes his coffee taste better. The coffee maker has its own replaceable charcoal filter, so with double filtering there can’t be much left but mostly pure water, with little chlorine.


    I just drink tap water. I never have understood if the presence of minerals in the water is a bad thing. I once lived in a small town that got its water from a fresh water spring. There was a second spring that fed off the same source that Coke kept trying to buy to bottle. The owner of the spring claimed the water had so many minerals it was classified as food. lol Are minerals not healthy?
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    Aug 06, 2020 9:06 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said<
    I just drink tap water. I never have understood if the presence of minerals in the water is a bad thing. I once lived in a small town that got its water from a fresh water spring. There was a second spring that fed off the same source that Coke kept trying to buy to bottle. The owner of the spring claimed the water had so many minerals it was classified as food. lol Are minerals not healthy?

    My Father’s mother had always drunk well water on her farm. When she had to go into the hospital in her late 80s , c. 1963, she refused to drink the city water. Her farm well water had to be brought to her in containers.

    I can’t judge my grandmother’s insistence. She passed away in 1964 of natural causes. Her wake was in her home, still done in those days.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 5263

    Aug 06, 2020 9:59 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Destinharbor said<
    I just drink tap water. I never have understood if the presence of minerals in the water is a bad thing. I once lived in a small town that got its water from a fresh water spring. There was a second spring that fed off the same source that Coke kept trying to buy to bottle. The owner of the spring claimed the water had so many minerals it was classified as food. lol Are minerals not healthy?

    My Father’s mother had always drunk well water on her farm. When she had to go into the hospital in her late 80s , c. 1963, she refused to drink the city water. Her farm well water had to be brought to her in containers.

    I can’t judge my grandmother’s insistence. She passed away in 1964 of natural causes. Her wake was in her home, still done in those days.

    BTW, that Dasani bottled water? I'm sure they have many plants now but you do know that is a Coke product that originated in New Jersey. New Jersey tap water. Not even filtered. They elbowed out all the spring fed bottled waters by low cost and massive shelf space and placement.
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    Aug 06, 2020 10:09 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    BTW, that Dasani bottled water? I'm sure they have many plants now but you do know that is a Coke product that originated in New Jersey. New Jersey tap water. Not even filtered. They elbowed out all the spring fed bottled waters by low cost and massive shelf space and placement.

    I know Coke owns it. As far as being unfiltered Jersey water, are you sure about that? (BTW, I was born and raised in Jehsey, as were my ancestors over 300 years ago. But the water prolly wasn’t polluted like now back then. This interests me. Maybe it accounts for my cancer?)
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 5263

    Aug 06, 2020 10:33 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Destinharbor said
    BTW, that Dasani bottled water? I'm sure they have many plants now but you do know that is a Coke product that originated in New Jersey. New Jersey tap water. Not even filtered. They elbowed out all the spring fed bottled waters by low cost and massive shelf space and placement.

    I know Coke owns it. As far as being unfiltered Jersey water, are you sure about that? (BTW, I was born and raised in Jehsey, as were my ancestors over 300 years ago. But the water prolly wasn’t polluted like now back then. This interests me. Maybe it accounts for my cancer?)

    The original was NJ. It also has added salt and minerals added sometimes.
  • DMVnewbie

    Posts: 42

    Aug 10, 2020 12:15 AM GMT
    I drink right from the tap. When I do go bottled, I go out of my way to not buy Dasani as I find the taste very off-putting.
  • JDuderrr

    Posts: 507

    Aug 12, 2020 5:46 PM GMT
    After moving to coastal Carolina in 2013, I noticed that some blackish snotty stuff would come out of the taps periodically. Not the optimal drinking experience. So I use a Brita brand filtering water pitcher and change out the filter right on schedule. Refrigerator also has a water filter. Costs about $50 to replace it but that's peanuts compared to drinking black snot. Rule is, if it's goin' in my mouth it's goin' through one of those two filters.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 4082

    Aug 13, 2020 7:32 PM GMT
    I only buy Dasani. The bottles are sturdy; dont collapse in your hand, and made from plants. Ill refill it once from home if its convenient, which is what bottled water is supposed to be.

    The water is reverse osmosis so it really doesn't matter what the source is. I believe it states from municipal supply.

    But mostly I refill and store RO water from the grocery in reusable 3 gallon containers. I'm afraid to drill the stone counter for an under sink system like I've planned into other homes.
    Pain in the ass hauling water though.
    May take a chance at some point if Im sure of staying.

    The only time I went without filter was in a little mountain town with a pure alpine source. Its insanity to add toxic industrisl waste.. aka flouride to pure water. RO is the only way to efficiently remove it.
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    Aug 13, 2020 9:46 PM GMT
    All this discussion about sources of bottled water makes me more convinced that our decision to drink highly filtered city tap water is better. Using best-rated Pur filters.

    We do have some Dasani bottles on hand, but only in case the city water is interrupted after a hurricane. And bottles introduce plastic recycling issues, that filtered tap water does not.
  • venue35

    Posts: 5561

    Aug 14, 2020 7:17 AM GMT
    i use a an american filter sold here called the matrikx pb1 it is pretty amazing.
    i don't drink tap water anymore i hate the chlorine smell. i also just got a binchotan charcoal filter which i use on the go it filters smaller quantities of water but you need to wait over two hours for it to work.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 14, 2020 8:44 PM GMT
    JDuderrr said
    After moving to coastal Carolina in 2013, I noticed that some blackish snotty stuff would come out of the taps periodically. Not the optimal drinking experience. So I use a Brita brand filtering water pitcher and change out the filter right on schedule. Refrigerator also has a water filter. Costs about $50 to replace it but that's peanuts compared to drinking black snot. Rule is, if it's goin' in my mouth it's goin' through one of those two filters.

    Our refrigerator has a cartridge filter, too. Otherwise your ice maker’s cubes are made from unfiltered water, that goes into your drink as the ice melts.

    We had a large cartridge filter arrangement under the kitchen sink, that fed a separate water tap. Problem was the filters were hard to find, a plumbing store item. And there was no way of knowing when the filter needed replacement, other than marking it as a future calendar item, because the water volume actually used wasn’t tracked.

    Our PUR faucet filter has 3 LEDs, for OK (green), Replace Soon (yellow), and Replace Now (red), based on actual use. I’m not sure if it measures water amount used, or back pressure at the filter. The latter would reflect purity of the filtered city water and could be variable.
  • ObscureAndFuz...

    Posts: 1521

    Aug 15, 2020 3:58 PM GMT
    Tap water. It's quite good in my area.
  • HikerCamper

    Posts: 143

    Aug 19, 2020 2:18 PM GMT
    Tap.