Low Sugar Jam - Pluots

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    Aug 24, 2020 8:56 PM GMT
    I was recently able to buy a quantity of Flavor Heart pluots (in season for only a few weeks) , and am attempting to make jam for the first time. Not wanting to add sugar, I am using Pacific Pectin's " low sugar "LM-O" pectin. No actual recipes, but they suggest it is intended for an end product of less than 30% brix, and the ideal pH range is 2.9 to 3.5. Not being a vintner, I don't have instruments to measure either brix or pH. I guess the first batch will be edicated guesses - hopefully to improve for the next time.

    Anyone else use this low sugar pectin?
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    Aug 24, 2020 10:14 PM GMT
    HikerSkier said
    Anyone else use this low sugar pectin?

    No. We have seen it on the shelves, but get the regular for his jam. Neither of us has a problem with an occasional sugar load. He pours a lot of granulated sugar into his own jam he makes. Doesn’t bother us at all, but then we only have it once a week or less.

    Everyone loves it, but we also tell people it’s got sugar in it, in case they have an issue with that. Same reason we let people know when his other creations contain ham, or any meat, or shellfish, or anything likely to be a problem for someone. But rest assured there’s a good chance somebody, despite your best efforts, will manage to fault your offerings, especially if they’re gay or lesbian.

    Some people are so fussy, while I’m like a garbage disposal - you can put almost anything in me. I’m not very sympathetic to those others, finding it more an affectation than a necessity. But OK, I’ll honor it, especially if they’re a guest in our home.

    Some won’t eat certain vegetables, whatever, like pre-schoolers. And so we have to poll our dinner guests beforehand, when planning dinner. May even require serving separate meals at the same table.

    Bringing me back to jam: you may be overdoing this. Jam is just jam. It’s not Mouton Rothschild, you don’t need a vintner. Leave that for when you dine on the Île-de-France.
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    Aug 25, 2020 12:53 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    HikerSkier said
    Anyone else use this low sugar pectin?

    No. We have seen it on the shelves, but get the regular for his jam. Neither of us has a problem with an occasional sugar load. He pours a lot of granulated sugar into his own jam he makes. Doesn’t bother us at all, but then we only have it once a week or less.

    Everyone loves it, but we also tell people it’s got sugar in it, in case they have an issue with that. Same reason we let people know when his other creations contain ham, or any meat, or shellfish, or anything likely to be a problem for someone. But rest assured there’s a good chance somebody, despite your best efforts, will manage to fault your offerings, especially if they’re gay or lesbian.

    Some people are so fussy, while I’m like a garbage disposal - you can put almost anything in me. I’m not very sympathetic to those others, finding it more an affectation than a necessity. But OK, I’ll honor it, especially if they’re a guest in our home.

    Some won’t eat certain vegetables, whatever, like pre-schoolers. And so we have to poll our dinner guests beforehand, when planning dinner. May even require serving separate meals at the same table.

    Bringing me back to jam: you may be overdoing this. Jam is just jam. It’s not Mouton Rothschild, you don’t need a vintner. Leave that for when you dine on the Île-de-France.


    Although I do have a sweet tooth, I know that sugar is not good for you, and best avoided. (Diabetes, fatty liver disease, belly fat, inflmation). So I eat as little as possible. I added no sugar to the pluots (they have enough of their own sugar). Jam turned out OK. 1/3 cup of their "low sugar LM-O" pectin for 15 lbs of pluots turned out right.
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    Aug 25, 2020 3:46 PM GMT
    HikerSkier said
    Although I do have a sweet tooth, I know that sugar is not good for you, and best avoided. (Diabetes, fatty liver disease, belly fat, inflmation). So I eat as little as possible. I added no sugar to the pluots (they have enough of their own sugar). Jam turned out OK. 1/3 cup of their "low sugar LM-O" pectin for 15 lbs of pluots turned out right.

    Rereading this I realize I was being more than a bit judgmental of some people. Not my first time. I conflated this into people who make a big fuss about what are truly silly food issues. I owe you an apology.

    My dear Mother would make a major case out of what kind of luttuce was in her restaurant salad. Was it Romaine or iceberg? She’d interrogate the poor waiter, who wouldn’t know, then insist he go back into the kitchen to find out. I’d be embarrassed to be sitting there with her. She only got that way in her later years (my age now!).

    Just like I cringe with people who send their food back 3 or more times. I’ll mention if there’s a problem with my own, and if it’s a fish instead of the chicken I ordered, but if it’s still edible I won’t make them throw it out. Maybe I’ll get an adjustment on the check. LOL!

    My main dietary taboo is the sweetener aspartame, used in most diet soft drinks, because of my epilepsy. There’s a lot of controversy whether it induces seizures. But when I was having frequent seizures I got suspicious about what Coke I was being served at gay clubs. I was told that “everybody” wants & gets diet. So I insisted no diet, only regular. The seizures largely stopped. Diet Coke has become to me like my Mother’s lettuce, although I’d contend for a sounder reason.

    In your case if you have an aversion to sugar then that’s understandable. We have friends also with genuine dietary restrictions. We do not have a sugar restriction ourselves, but nevertheless we do watch how much sugar we have, and avoid too many sweets for purposes of weight control. Just like we watch our salt intake for circulatory issues.

    We don’t ban them, just moderate them, and other things we’ve gotta watch. Just like I must with some shellfish, such as shrimp, an issue regarding its iodine. Too much and I break out in hives, an hereditary thing. And if an X-ray requires a contrast dye injection containing iodine, I go into anaphylactic shock, the staff alerted to stand ready to administer an antidote, that I always require.

    But I still will get the X-ray, if the doctors need it, despite the serious risk & unpleasantness. And I continue to like shrimp, just eat it in small amounts. I hate the idea of being a dietary queen.

    I’m glad your jam turned out fine. I’ll let my guy know you had good results with the low-sugar pectin. Assuming it has no aspartame! icon_wink.gif
  • carew28

    Posts: 1510

    Aug 25, 2020 7:54 PM GMT
    For those who may be unaware, pluots are a modern fruit that were only created in 1989. The original hybridizer wanted to create a type of plum tree that would grow in colder climates. Plums and apricots are closely related. He crossed a plum tree with an apricot tree (apricot trees can withstand cold weather better than plum trees) and called it a plumcot. Then he crossed the plumcot back with a pure plum, in order to maintain the plum flavor and taste. The result was the pluot. And so pluots are 75% plum and 25% apricot.

    I myself have never tasted a pluot, I've always been traditional and stuck with plums. But I may try them one of these days.
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    Sep 07, 2020 4:26 PM GMT
    carew28 saidFor those who may be unaware, pluots are a modern fruit that were only created in 1989. The original hybridizer wanted to create a type of plum tree that would grow in colder climates. Plums and apricots are closely related. He crossed a plum tree with an apricot tree (apricot trees can withstand cold weather better than plum trees) and called it a plumcot. Then he crossed the plumcot back with a pure plum, in order to maintain the plum flavor and taste. The result was the pluot. And so pluots are 75% plum and 25% apricot.

    I myself have never tasted a pluot, I've always been traditional and stuck with plums. But I may try them one of these days.


    In California (where pluots, plumcots, and apriums were developed), there are now many varieties. However, Of the 20 or so that have been developed, I have only found a few that have excellent flavor and sweetness:

    Flavor Heart (The largest, and sweetest - only available for a few weeks in late August -September)

    Flavor King

    Flavor Queen (very sweet in late August and September - less so, if picked earlier)

    Dapple Dandy.